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Nurses' attitudes, beliefs and practices on sexuality for cardiovascular care: A cross-sectional study.
J Clin Nurs. 2019 Mar; 28(5-6):980-986.JC

Abstract

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

To describe nurses' attitudes, beliefs, and practices regarding sexuality care for patients with cardiovascular disease.

BACKGROUND

Limited sexual activity is common among patients with cardiovascular disease, yet assessment of sexuality and counselling is frequently not undertaken by nurses.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional study.

METHODS

This study recruited 268 cardiac nurses from seven tertiary hospitals in five cities of Henan province. The Sexual Attitudes and Beliefs Survey, along with investigator-developed questions regarding practices and perceived barriers, was administered to the nurses. The STROBE checklist was used to ensure quality reporting during this observational study (see Supporting Information Data S1).

RESULTS

The average age of nurses who participated was 31.81 years (SD = 7.41). The average score of Sexual Attitudes and Beliefs Survey was 47.72 (SD = 7.40), indicating moderate attitudinal barriers for nurses to discuss sexual activities with patients. Most nurses (91%) perceived that sexuality was too private to discuss with patients. Only 20% of nurses expressed that they would provide time to discuss sexual concerns with patients. Eighty per cent of nurses revealed that they felt uncomfortable discussing sexuality; moreover, they believed that hospitalised patients were too sick to be engaged in these types of conversations. Additionally, almost 85% of nurses conveyed that they have never conducted discussions regarding sexuality care in patients with cardiovascular disease. The most frequently reported perceived barriers preventing nurses from discussing sexual concerns included fear of offending patients (77.2%), uncertainty of how to communicate with patients (69.4%), feelings of embarrassment (67.5%), lack of safe and private environments (61.9%) and lack of knowledge (54.9%).

CONCLUSION

Nurses in this cross-sectional sample rarely discussed sexual concerns with their patients. There were several key barriers identified by nurses regarding providing sexuality care, including personal attitudes and beliefs, limited skills and knowledge, culture and organizational-related barriers.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE

Targeted training for nurses and creating a culturally safe environment is recommended to improve management of sexuality in patients with CVD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Nursing, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China. Nursing Department, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China.Nursing Department, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China.Department of Acute and Chronic Care, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland.Department of Acute and Chronic Care, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland.Nursing Department, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China.School of Nursing, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China. Nursing Department, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Observational Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30338867

Citation

Wang, Panpan, et al. "Nurses' Attitudes, Beliefs and Practices On Sexuality for Cardiovascular Care: a Cross-sectional Study." Journal of Clinical Nursing, vol. 28, no. 5-6, 2019, pp. 980-986.
Wang P, Ai J, Davidson PM, et al. Nurses' attitudes, beliefs and practices on sexuality for cardiovascular care: A cross-sectional study. J Clin Nurs. 2019;28(5-6):980-986.
Wang, P., Ai, J., Davidson, P. M., Slater, T., Du, R., & Chen, C. (2019). Nurses' attitudes, beliefs and practices on sexuality for cardiovascular care: A cross-sectional study. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 28(5-6), 980-986. https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.14692
Wang P, et al. Nurses' Attitudes, Beliefs and Practices On Sexuality for Cardiovascular Care: a Cross-sectional Study. J Clin Nurs. 2019;28(5-6):980-986. PubMed PMID: 30338867.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nurses' attitudes, beliefs and practices on sexuality for cardiovascular care: A cross-sectional study. AU - Wang,Panpan, AU - Ai,Jiansai, AU - Davidson,Patricia M, AU - Slater,Tammy, AU - Du,Ruofei, AU - Chen,Changying, Y1 - 2018/11/20/ PY - 2018/06/26/received PY - 2018/08/21/revised PY - 2018/09/30/accepted PY - 2018/10/20/pubmed PY - 2019/3/21/medline PY - 2018/10/20/entrez KW - attitudes KW - cardiovascular disease KW - health knowledge KW - nurses KW - practice KW - sexuality SP - 980 EP - 986 JF - Journal of clinical nursing JO - J Clin Nurs VL - 28 IS - 5-6 N2 - AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe nurses' attitudes, beliefs, and practices regarding sexuality care for patients with cardiovascular disease. BACKGROUND: Limited sexual activity is common among patients with cardiovascular disease, yet assessment of sexuality and counselling is frequently not undertaken by nurses. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: This study recruited 268 cardiac nurses from seven tertiary hospitals in five cities of Henan province. The Sexual Attitudes and Beliefs Survey, along with investigator-developed questions regarding practices and perceived barriers, was administered to the nurses. The STROBE checklist was used to ensure quality reporting during this observational study (see Supporting Information Data S1). RESULTS: The average age of nurses who participated was 31.81 years (SD = 7.41). The average score of Sexual Attitudes and Beliefs Survey was 47.72 (SD = 7.40), indicating moderate attitudinal barriers for nurses to discuss sexual activities with patients. Most nurses (91%) perceived that sexuality was too private to discuss with patients. Only 20% of nurses expressed that they would provide time to discuss sexual concerns with patients. Eighty per cent of nurses revealed that they felt uncomfortable discussing sexuality; moreover, they believed that hospitalised patients were too sick to be engaged in these types of conversations. Additionally, almost 85% of nurses conveyed that they have never conducted discussions regarding sexuality care in patients with cardiovascular disease. The most frequently reported perceived barriers preventing nurses from discussing sexual concerns included fear of offending patients (77.2%), uncertainty of how to communicate with patients (69.4%), feelings of embarrassment (67.5%), lack of safe and private environments (61.9%) and lack of knowledge (54.9%). CONCLUSION: Nurses in this cross-sectional sample rarely discussed sexual concerns with their patients. There were several key barriers identified by nurses regarding providing sexuality care, including personal attitudes and beliefs, limited skills and knowledge, culture and organizational-related barriers. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Targeted training for nurses and creating a culturally safe environment is recommended to improve management of sexuality in patients with CVD. SN - 1365-2702 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30338867/Nurses'_attitudes_beliefs_and_practices_on_sexuality_for_cardiovascular_care:_A_cross_sectional_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.14692 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -