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The chemodiversity of paddy soil dissolved organic matter correlates with microbial community at continental scales.
Microbiome. 2018 10 19; 6(1):187.M

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Paddy soil dissolved organic matter (DOM) represents a major hotspot for soil biogeochemistry, yet we know little about its chemodiversity let alone the microbial community that shapes it. Here, we leveraged ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry, amplicon, and metagenomic sequencing to characterize the molecular distribution of DOM and the taxonomic and functional microbial diversity in paddy soils across China. We hypothesized that variances in microbial community significantly associate with changes in soil DOM molecular composition.

RESULTS

We report that both microbial and DOM profiles revealed geographic patterns that were associated with variation in mean monthly precipitation, mean annual temperature, and pH. DOM molecular diversity was significantly correlated with microbial taxonomic diversity. An increase in DOM molecules categorized as peptides, carbohydrates, and unsaturated aliphatics, and a decrease in those belonging to polyphenolics and polycyclic aromatics, significantly correlated with proportional changes in some of the microbial taxa, such as Syntrophobacterales, Thermoleophilia, Geobacter, Spirochaeta, Gaiella, and Defluviicoccus. DOM composition was also associated with the relative abundances of the microbial metabolic pathways, such as anaerobic carbon fixation, glycolysis, lignolysis, fermentation, and methanogenesis.

CONCLUSIONS

Our study demonstrates the continental-scale distribution of DOM is significantly correlated with the taxonomic profile and metabolic potential of the rice paddy microbiome. Abiotic factors that have a distinct effect on community structure can also influence the chemodiversity of DOM and vice versa. Deciphering these associations and the underlying mechanisms can precipitate understanding of the complex ecology of paddy soils, as well as help assess the effects of human activities on biogeochemistry and greenhouse gas emissions in paddy soils.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Environment and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, 866 Yuhangtang Ave, Hangzhou, 310058, China.National Plateau Wetlands Research Center, Southwest Forestry University, 300 Bailongsi, Kunming, 650224, China.The Microbiome Center, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL, 60439, USA. Department of Surgery, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60637, USA.National Center of Plant Gene Research (Beijing), Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, West Beichen Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing, 100101, China.College of Environment and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, 866 Yuhangtang Ave, Hangzhou, 310058, China.College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, 18 Chaowang Ave, Hangzhou, 310014, China.College of Environment and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, 866 Yuhangtang Ave, Hangzhou, 310058, China.College of Environment and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, 866 Yuhangtang Ave, Hangzhou, 310058, China. Hangzhou Gusheng Agricultural Technology Company Limited, Chongxian Innovation Industrial Park, Chongxian Ave, Hangzhou, 311108, China.College of Environment and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, 866 Yuhangtang Ave, Hangzhou, 310058, China. Hangzhou Gusheng Agricultural Technology Company Limited, Chongxian Innovation Industrial Park, Chongxian Ave, Hangzhou, 311108, China.College of Environment and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, 866 Yuhangtang Ave, Hangzhou, 310058, China.The Microbiome Center, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL, 60439, USA. Department of Surgery, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60637, USA.The Microbiome Center, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL, 60439, USA. Department of Surgery, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60637, USA.Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1799 Jimei Ave, Xiamen, 361021, China.National Center of Plant Gene Research (Beijing), Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, West Beichen Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing, 100101, China.The Microbiome Center, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL, 60439, USA. gilbertjack@uchicgao.edu. Department of Surgery, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60637, USA. gilbertjack@uchicgao.edu.College of Environment and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, 866 Yuhangtang Ave, Hangzhou, 310058, China. zhangzhijian@zju.edu.cn. Hangzhou Gusheng Agricultural Technology Company Limited, Chongxian Innovation Industrial Park, Chongxian Ave, Hangzhou, 311108, China. zhangzhijian@zju.edu.cn. China Academy of West Region Development, Zhejiang University, 866 Yuhangtang Ave, Hangzhou, 310058, China. zhangzhijian@zju.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30340631

Citation

Li, Hong-Yi, et al. "The Chemodiversity of Paddy Soil Dissolved Organic Matter Correlates With Microbial Community at Continental Scales." Microbiome, vol. 6, no. 1, 2018, p. 187.
Li HY, Wang H, Wang HT, et al. The chemodiversity of paddy soil dissolved organic matter correlates with microbial community at continental scales. Microbiome. 2018;6(1):187.
Li, H. Y., Wang, H., Wang, H. T., Xin, P. Y., Xu, X. H., Ma, Y., Liu, W. P., Teng, C. Y., Jiang, C. L., Lou, L. P., Arnold, W., Cralle, L., Zhu, Y. G., Chu, J. F., Gilbert, J. A., & Zhang, Z. J. (2018). The chemodiversity of paddy soil dissolved organic matter correlates with microbial community at continental scales. Microbiome, 6(1), 187. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40168-018-0561-x
Li HY, et al. The Chemodiversity of Paddy Soil Dissolved Organic Matter Correlates With Microbial Community at Continental Scales. Microbiome. 2018 10 19;6(1):187. PubMed PMID: 30340631.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The chemodiversity of paddy soil dissolved organic matter correlates with microbial community at continental scales. AU - Li,Hong-Yi, AU - Wang,Hang, AU - Wang,Hai-Tiao, AU - Xin,Pei-Yong, AU - Xu,Xin-Hua, AU - Ma,Yun, AU - Liu,Wei-Ping, AU - Teng,Chang-Yun, AU - Jiang,Cheng-Liang, AU - Lou,Li-Ping, AU - Arnold,Wyatt, AU - Cralle,Lauren, AU - Zhu,Yong-Guan, AU - Chu,Jin-Fang, AU - Gilbert,Jack A, AU - Zhang,Zhi-Jian, Y1 - 2018/10/19/ PY - 2018/03/28/received PY - 2018/09/20/accepted PY - 2018/10/21/entrez PY - 2018/10/21/pubmed PY - 2019/3/6/medline KW - Chemodiversity KW - Dissolved organic matter KW - FT-ICR-MS KW - Microbial diversity KW - Paddy soil SP - 187 EP - 187 JF - Microbiome JO - Microbiome VL - 6 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Paddy soil dissolved organic matter (DOM) represents a major hotspot for soil biogeochemistry, yet we know little about its chemodiversity let alone the microbial community that shapes it. Here, we leveraged ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry, amplicon, and metagenomic sequencing to characterize the molecular distribution of DOM and the taxonomic and functional microbial diversity in paddy soils across China. We hypothesized that variances in microbial community significantly associate with changes in soil DOM molecular composition. RESULTS: We report that both microbial and DOM profiles revealed geographic patterns that were associated with variation in mean monthly precipitation, mean annual temperature, and pH. DOM molecular diversity was significantly correlated with microbial taxonomic diversity. An increase in DOM molecules categorized as peptides, carbohydrates, and unsaturated aliphatics, and a decrease in those belonging to polyphenolics and polycyclic aromatics, significantly correlated with proportional changes in some of the microbial taxa, such as Syntrophobacterales, Thermoleophilia, Geobacter, Spirochaeta, Gaiella, and Defluviicoccus. DOM composition was also associated with the relative abundances of the microbial metabolic pathways, such as anaerobic carbon fixation, glycolysis, lignolysis, fermentation, and methanogenesis. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates the continental-scale distribution of DOM is significantly correlated with the taxonomic profile and metabolic potential of the rice paddy microbiome. Abiotic factors that have a distinct effect on community structure can also influence the chemodiversity of DOM and vice versa. Deciphering these associations and the underlying mechanisms can precipitate understanding of the complex ecology of paddy soils, as well as help assess the effects of human activities on biogeochemistry and greenhouse gas emissions in paddy soils. SN - 2049-2618 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30340631/The_chemodiversity_of_paddy_soil_dissolved_organic_matter_correlates_with_microbial_community_at_continental_scales L2 - https://microbiomejournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40168-018-0561-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -