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Psychological impact of the 2015 MERS outbreak on hospital workers and quarantined hemodialysis patients.
Compr Psychiatry. 2018 11; 87:123-127.CP

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

This study aimed to assess the immediate stress and psychological impact experienced by quarantined patients undergoing hemodialysis and university hospital workers who treated patients Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) during its outbreak.

DESIGN

The group of subjects consisted of 1800 hospital practitioners and 73 quarantined patients undergoing hemodialysis. The Impact of Events Scale-Revised (IES-R) was administered to the practitioners twice, once during the hospital shutdown and again one month after the shutdown. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were administered to patients undergoing hemodialysis.

RESULTS

During the initial stages of the MERS outbreak, healthcare workers who performed MERS-related tasks scored significantly higher on the total IES-R and its subscales. In the second assessment of the high-risk group, the sleep and numbness subscale scores from the IES-R differed depending on the implementation of home quarantine, and the intrusion subscale scores differed depending on the performance of MERS-related tasks.

CONCLUSION

Medical staff that performed MERS-related tasks showed the highest risk for post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms even after time had elapsed. The risk increased even after home quarantine. Prompt and continuous psychiatric intervention is needed in high mortality infectious disease outbreaks.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Konyang University Hospital, College of Medicine, Konyang University, Daejeon, Republic of Korea; Konyang University, Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Daejeon 35365, Republic of Korea.Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.Department of Psychiatry, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.Department of Biomedical Science and Engineering and School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: tae-kim@gist.ac.kr.Department of Psychiatry, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: parkdawit@naver.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30343247

Citation

Lee, Sang Min, et al. "Psychological Impact of the 2015 MERS Outbreak On Hospital Workers and Quarantined Hemodialysis Patients." Comprehensive Psychiatry, vol. 87, 2018, pp. 123-127.
Lee SM, Kang WS, Cho AR, et al. Psychological impact of the 2015 MERS outbreak on hospital workers and quarantined hemodialysis patients. Compr Psychiatry. 2018;87:123-127.
Lee, S. M., Kang, W. S., Cho, A. R., Kim, T., & Park, J. K. (2018). Psychological impact of the 2015 MERS outbreak on hospital workers and quarantined hemodialysis patients. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 87, 123-127. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.comppsych.2018.10.003
Lee SM, et al. Psychological Impact of the 2015 MERS Outbreak On Hospital Workers and Quarantined Hemodialysis Patients. Compr Psychiatry. 2018;87:123-127. PubMed PMID: 30343247.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychological impact of the 2015 MERS outbreak on hospital workers and quarantined hemodialysis patients. AU - Lee,Sang Min, AU - Kang,Won Sub, AU - Cho,Ah-Rang, AU - Kim,Tae, AU - Park,Jin Kyung, Y1 - 2018/10/13/ PY - 2018/01/04/received PY - 2018/09/11/revised PY - 2018/10/11/accepted PY - 2018/10/22/pubmed PY - 2019/6/27/medline PY - 2018/10/22/entrez KW - Healthcare workers KW - Mental health KW - Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection KW - Quarantine SP - 123 EP - 127 JF - Comprehensive psychiatry JO - Compr Psychiatry VL - 87 N2 - OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess the immediate stress and psychological impact experienced by quarantined patients undergoing hemodialysis and university hospital workers who treated patients Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) during its outbreak. DESIGN: The group of subjects consisted of 1800 hospital practitioners and 73 quarantined patients undergoing hemodialysis. The Impact of Events Scale-Revised (IES-R) was administered to the practitioners twice, once during the hospital shutdown and again one month after the shutdown. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were administered to patients undergoing hemodialysis. RESULTS: During the initial stages of the MERS outbreak, healthcare workers who performed MERS-related tasks scored significantly higher on the total IES-R and its subscales. In the second assessment of the high-risk group, the sleep and numbness subscale scores from the IES-R differed depending on the implementation of home quarantine, and the intrusion subscale scores differed depending on the performance of MERS-related tasks. CONCLUSION: Medical staff that performed MERS-related tasks showed the highest risk for post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms even after time had elapsed. The risk increased even after home quarantine. Prompt and continuous psychiatric intervention is needed in high mortality infectious disease outbreaks. SN - 1532-8384 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30343247/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0010-440X(18)30166-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -