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Update in the Management of Macular Edema Following Retinal Vein Occlusions.
Curr Ophthalmol Rep. 2016 Mar; 4(1):38-47.CO

Abstract

Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is a common retinal vascular disease classified according to the anatomical location of the occlusion in central (CRVO) or branch (BRVO) retinal vein occlusion. RVO is an important cause of visual loss worldwide and frequently results in visual impairment and ocular complications. Major causes of vision loss in BRVO and CRVO include macular edema (ME), capillary non-perfusion, and neovascularization, causing glaucoma, vitreous hemorrhage and/or tractional retinal detachment.[1-4] Macular edema is the leading cause of decreased central visual acuity in RVO.[5] Recently, there was a paradigm shift in the treatment of ME due to RVO with the advent of new pharmacotherapy treatment strategies and combination therapies. This paper reviews the current thinking and discusses the evidence behind the emerging treatment options for ME following RVO, including laser photocoagulation, intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), intravitreal corticosteroid-based pharmacotherapies, and surgical management.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Banco de Olhos de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil. marithorell@gmail.com.Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, USA. RGoldhardt@med.miami.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30345164

Citation

Thorell, Mariana R., and Raquel Goldhardt. "Update in the Management of Macular Edema Following Retinal Vein Occlusions." Current Ophthalmology Reports, vol. 4, no. 1, 2016, pp. 38-47.
Thorell MR, Goldhardt R. Update in the Management of Macular Edema Following Retinal Vein Occlusions. Curr Ophthalmol Rep. 2016;4(1):38-47.
Thorell, M. R., & Goldhardt, R. (2016). Update in the Management of Macular Edema Following Retinal Vein Occlusions. Current Ophthalmology Reports, 4(1), 38-47. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40135-016-0091-2
Thorell MR, Goldhardt R. Update in the Management of Macular Edema Following Retinal Vein Occlusions. Curr Ophthalmol Rep. 2016;4(1):38-47. PubMed PMID: 30345164.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Update in the Management of Macular Edema Following Retinal Vein Occlusions. AU - Thorell,Mariana R, AU - Goldhardt,Raquel, Y1 - 2016/03/10/ PY - 2018/10/23/entrez PY - 2016/3/1/pubmed PY - 2016/3/1/medline KW - Intravitreal Injections KW - Macular Edema KW - Retinal Vein Occlusion KW - Steroids KW - Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors SP - 38 EP - 47 JF - Current ophthalmology reports JO - Curr Ophthalmol Rep VL - 4 IS - 1 N2 - Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is a common retinal vascular disease classified according to the anatomical location of the occlusion in central (CRVO) or branch (BRVO) retinal vein occlusion. RVO is an important cause of visual loss worldwide and frequently results in visual impairment and ocular complications. Major causes of vision loss in BRVO and CRVO include macular edema (ME), capillary non-perfusion, and neovascularization, causing glaucoma, vitreous hemorrhage and/or tractional retinal detachment.[1-4] Macular edema is the leading cause of decreased central visual acuity in RVO.[5] Recently, there was a paradigm shift in the treatment of ME due to RVO with the advent of new pharmacotherapy treatment strategies and combination therapies. This paper reviews the current thinking and discusses the evidence behind the emerging treatment options for ME following RVO, including laser photocoagulation, intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), intravitreal corticosteroid-based pharmacotherapies, and surgical management. SN - 2167-4868 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30345164/Update_in_the_Management_of_Macular_Edema_Following_Retinal_Vein_Occlusions_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/30345164/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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