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Whole-plant frost hardiness of mycorrhizal (Hebeloma sp. or Suillus luteus) and non-mycorrhizal Scots pine seedlings.
Tree Physiol. 2019 04 01; 39(4):526-535.TP

Abstract

Ectomycorrhizal trees are common in the cold regions of the world, yet the role of the mycorrhizal symbiosis in plant cold tolerance is poorly known. Moreover, the standard methods for testing plant frost hardiness may not be adequate for roots and mycorrhizas. The aims of this study were to compare the frost hardiness of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings and to test the use of reverse-flow root hydraulic conductance (Kr) measurement for root frost hardiness determination. Mycorrhizal (Hebeloma sp. or Suillus luteus) and non-mycorrhizal seedlings were grown in controlled-environment chambers for 13 weeks. After this, half of the plants were allotted to a non-hardening treatment (long day and high temperature, same as during the preceding growing season) and the other half to a hardening (short day and low temperature) 'autumn' treatment for 4 weeks. The intact seedlings were exposed to whole-plant freezing tests and the needle frost hardiness was measured by relative electrolyte leakage (REL) method. The seedlings were grown for three more weeks for visual damage assessment and Kr measurements using a high-pressure flow meter (HPFM). Mycorrhizas did not affect the frost hardiness of seedlings in either hardening treatment. The effect of the hardening treatment on frost hardiness was shown by REL and visual assessment of the aboveground parts as well as Kr of roots. Non-mycorrhizal plants were larger than mycorrhizal ones while nitrogen and phosphorus contents (per unit dry mass) were similar in all mycorrhiza treatments. In plants with no frost exposure, the non-mycorrhizal treatment had higher Kr. There was no mycorrhizal effect on plant frost hardiness when nutritional effects were excluded. Further studies are needed on the role of mycorrhizas especially in the recovery of growth and nutrient uptake in cold soils in the spring. The HPFM is useful novel method for assessment of root damage.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Natural Resources, PO Box 68, Joensuu, Finland. School of Forest Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, PO Box 111, Joensuu, Finland.School of Forest Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, PO Box 111, Joensuu, Finland.Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Natural Resources, PO Box 68, Joensuu, Finland.Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Natural Resources, PO Box 68, Joensuu, Finland.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30371901

Citation

Korhonen, Anna, et al. "Whole-plant Frost Hardiness of Mycorrhizal (Hebeloma Sp. or Suillus Luteus) and Non-mycorrhizal Scots Pine Seedlings." Tree Physiology, vol. 39, no. 4, 2019, pp. 526-535.
Korhonen A, Lehto T, Heinonen J, et al. Whole-plant frost hardiness of mycorrhizal (Hebeloma sp. or Suillus luteus) and non-mycorrhizal Scots pine seedlings. Tree Physiol. 2019;39(4):526-535.
Korhonen, A., Lehto, T., Heinonen, J., & Repo, T. (2019). Whole-plant frost hardiness of mycorrhizal (Hebeloma sp. or Suillus luteus) and non-mycorrhizal Scots pine seedlings. Tree Physiology, 39(4), 526-535. https://doi.org/10.1093/treephys/tpy105
Korhonen A, et al. Whole-plant Frost Hardiness of Mycorrhizal (Hebeloma Sp. or Suillus Luteus) and Non-mycorrhizal Scots Pine Seedlings. Tree Physiol. 2019 04 1;39(4):526-535. PubMed PMID: 30371901.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Whole-plant frost hardiness of mycorrhizal (Hebeloma sp. or Suillus luteus) and non-mycorrhizal Scots pine seedlings. AU - Korhonen,Anna, AU - Lehto,Tarja, AU - Heinonen,Jaakko, AU - Repo,Tapani, PY - 2017/12/23/received PY - 2018/07/10/revised PY - 2018/09/02/accepted PY - 2018/10/30/pubmed PY - 2019/11/5/medline PY - 2018/10/30/entrez KW - Pinus sylvestris, relative electrolyte leakage (REL) KW - cold KW - ectomycorrhiza KW - frost KW - hydraulic conductance KW - mycorrhiza KW - winter SP - 526 EP - 535 JF - Tree physiology JO - Tree Physiol. VL - 39 IS - 4 N2 - Ectomycorrhizal trees are common in the cold regions of the world, yet the role of the mycorrhizal symbiosis in plant cold tolerance is poorly known. Moreover, the standard methods for testing plant frost hardiness may not be adequate for roots and mycorrhizas. The aims of this study were to compare the frost hardiness of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings and to test the use of reverse-flow root hydraulic conductance (Kr) measurement for root frost hardiness determination. Mycorrhizal (Hebeloma sp. or Suillus luteus) and non-mycorrhizal seedlings were grown in controlled-environment chambers for 13 weeks. After this, half of the plants were allotted to a non-hardening treatment (long day and high temperature, same as during the preceding growing season) and the other half to a hardening (short day and low temperature) 'autumn' treatment for 4 weeks. The intact seedlings were exposed to whole-plant freezing tests and the needle frost hardiness was measured by relative electrolyte leakage (REL) method. The seedlings were grown for three more weeks for visual damage assessment and Kr measurements using a high-pressure flow meter (HPFM). Mycorrhizas did not affect the frost hardiness of seedlings in either hardening treatment. The effect of the hardening treatment on frost hardiness was shown by REL and visual assessment of the aboveground parts as well as Kr of roots. Non-mycorrhizal plants were larger than mycorrhizal ones while nitrogen and phosphorus contents (per unit dry mass) were similar in all mycorrhiza treatments. In plants with no frost exposure, the non-mycorrhizal treatment had higher Kr. There was no mycorrhizal effect on plant frost hardiness when nutritional effects were excluded. Further studies are needed on the role of mycorrhizas especially in the recovery of growth and nutrient uptake in cold soils in the spring. The HPFM is useful novel method for assessment of root damage. SN - 1758-4469 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30371901/Whole-plant_frost_hardiness_of_mycorrhizal_(Hebeloma_sp._or_Suillus_luteus)_and_non-mycorrhizal_Scots_pine_seedlings L2 - https://academic.oup.com/treephys/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/treephys/tpy105 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -