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Meatal stenosis after surgical correction of short frenulum: Is the "pull-and-burn" method the way to go?
Urol Ann 2018 Oct-Dec; 10(4):354-357UA

Abstract

Background and Objectives

The surgical correction of a short frenulum includes several procedures that vary in complexity of the technique and the use of stitches, lasers, or skin grafts. However, little is known about the effect of these procedures on meatal stenosis. A possible association of frenular artery trauma during circumcision and subsequent meatal stenosis has raised concerns regarding the importance of frenulum preservation. We hereby report our experience over 15 years of applying the "pull-and-burn" method for short frenulum correction.

Patients and Methods

A total of 236 patients underwent the "pull-and-burn" procedure for short frenulum under local anesthesia on an outpatient basis between November 2002 and November 2017. The method is suture free and involves tearing the frenulum superficially and vertically by the aid of a low-power, high-frequency hyfrecator, avoiding the underlying frenular vessels. Patients were advised for a regular follow-up visit at 2-3 months postoperatively and were reviewed for symptoms and signs suggestive of meatal stenosis.

Results

Follow-up files were available for 228 patients (96.6%). No symptoms suggestive of meatal stenosis (dysuria and stream pattern abnormalities) were reported by any patient. Examination of the urethral meatus revealed normal appearance, with no signs of edema or scarring in all the 228 patients.

Conclusions

The "pull-and-burn" method is a simple and safe procedure for the correction of short frenulum that respects anatomically the delicate vasculature of the frenular area, resulting in the preservation of the integrity of the urethral meatus.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Anatomy, University of Patras Medical School and Olympion Hospital, Patras, Greece.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30386085

Citation

Gyftopoulos, Kostis I.. "Meatal Stenosis After Surgical Correction of Short Frenulum: Is the "pull-and-burn" Method the Way to Go?" Urology Annals, vol. 10, no. 4, 2018, pp. 354-357.
Gyftopoulos KI. Meatal stenosis after surgical correction of short frenulum: Is the "pull-and-burn" method the way to go? Urol Ann. 2018;10(4):354-357.
Gyftopoulos, K. I. (2018). Meatal stenosis after surgical correction of short frenulum: Is the "pull-and-burn" method the way to go? Urology Annals, 10(4), pp. 354-357. doi:10.4103/UA.UA_25_18.
Gyftopoulos KI. Meatal Stenosis After Surgical Correction of Short Frenulum: Is the "pull-and-burn" Method the Way to Go. Urol Ann. 2018;10(4):354-357. PubMed PMID: 30386085.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Meatal stenosis after surgical correction of short frenulum: Is the "pull-and-burn" method the way to go? A1 - Gyftopoulos,Kostis I, PY - 2018/11/3/entrez PY - 2018/11/6/pubmed PY - 2018/11/6/medline KW - Anatomy KW - frenuloplasty KW - frenulum KW - stenosis KW - urethra meatus SP - 354 EP - 357 JF - Urology annals JO - Urol Ann VL - 10 IS - 4 N2 - Background and Objectives: The surgical correction of a short frenulum includes several procedures that vary in complexity of the technique and the use of stitches, lasers, or skin grafts. However, little is known about the effect of these procedures on meatal stenosis. A possible association of frenular artery trauma during circumcision and subsequent meatal stenosis has raised concerns regarding the importance of frenulum preservation. We hereby report our experience over 15 years of applying the "pull-and-burn" method for short frenulum correction. Patients and Methods: A total of 236 patients underwent the "pull-and-burn" procedure for short frenulum under local anesthesia on an outpatient basis between November 2002 and November 2017. The method is suture free and involves tearing the frenulum superficially and vertically by the aid of a low-power, high-frequency hyfrecator, avoiding the underlying frenular vessels. Patients were advised for a regular follow-up visit at 2-3 months postoperatively and were reviewed for symptoms and signs suggestive of meatal stenosis. Results: Follow-up files were available for 228 patients (96.6%). No symptoms suggestive of meatal stenosis (dysuria and stream pattern abnormalities) were reported by any patient. Examination of the urethral meatus revealed normal appearance, with no signs of edema or scarring in all the 228 patients. Conclusions: The "pull-and-burn" method is a simple and safe procedure for the correction of short frenulum that respects anatomically the delicate vasculature of the frenular area, resulting in the preservation of the integrity of the urethral meatus. SN - 0974-7796 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30386085/Meatal_stenosis_after_surgical_correction_of_short_frenulum:_Is_the_"pull-and-burn"_method_the_way_to_go L2 - http://www.urologyannals.com/article.asp?issn=0974-7796;year=2018;volume=10;issue=4;spage=354;epage=357;aulast=Gyftopoulos;type=2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -