Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A review of coccidiosis in Old World camels.
Vet Parasitol. 2018 Oct 15; 262:75-83.VP

Abstract

Domesticated Old World camels (Camelus dromedarius and C. bactrianus) are important for the economy of several countries in Asia, Africa, and the Arabian Peninsula, and coccidiosis is important as a cause of mortality in juvenile camels. There is confusion concerning the species of coccidian parasites in camels and their life cycles. The objective of the present paper is to review biology of the Eimeria and Cystoisospora species in camels. The following conclusions were drawn. Although five species of Eimeria; E. cameli, E. rajasthani, E. dromedarii, E. bactriani, and E. pellerdyi were named from camels, only E. cameli, E. rajasthani, E. dromedarii have been consistently found in numerous surveys and they are morphologically distinct. We consider E. pellerdyi and E. bacterini as species enquirende/ not valid. E. cameli oocysts are distinctive, dark brown and up to 108 μm long. Its gametogonic stages and oocysts are present in the lamina propria of small intestines; only sexual stages have been confirmed. The remaining species of Eimeria (E. rajasthani and E. dromedarii) in camels are <40 μm long and their endogenous stages are unknown. There is one valid species of Cystoisospora, C. orlovi in camels and is associated with severe disease in young camels, both pastoral and stall fed camels. Camels as young as nine days old can develop severe diarrhea and can die before oocysts are detected in feces. Lesions and endogenous stages are confined to the large intestine. The main lesion is hemorrhagic, diphtheroid to hemorrhagic colitis-associated with sexual stages; asexual stages are unknown. Oocysts are rarely excreted by adult camels, and in low numbers. Therefore, infection in very young camels remains unexplained.

Authors+Show Affiliations

United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, Animal Parasitic Diseases Laboratory, Beltsville, MD, 20705-2350, USA. Electronic address: jitender.dubey@ars.usda.gov.Central Veterinary Research Laboratory, PO Box 597, Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30389015

Citation

Dubey, J P., and R K. Schuster. "A Review of Coccidiosis in Old World Camels." Veterinary Parasitology, vol. 262, 2018, pp. 75-83.
Dubey JP, Schuster RK. A review of coccidiosis in Old World camels. Vet Parasitol. 2018;262:75-83.
Dubey, J. P., & Schuster, R. K. (2018). A review of coccidiosis in Old World camels. Veterinary Parasitology, 262, 75-83. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2018.08.008
Dubey JP, Schuster RK. A Review of Coccidiosis in Old World Camels. Vet Parasitol. 2018 Oct 15;262:75-83. PubMed PMID: 30389015.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A review of coccidiosis in Old World camels. AU - Dubey,J P, AU - Schuster,R K, Y1 - 2018/08/23/ PY - 2018/07/06/received PY - 2018/08/20/revised PY - 2018/08/21/accepted PY - 2018/11/4/entrez PY - 2018/11/6/pubmed PY - 2018/11/24/medline KW - Camel (Camelus dromedarius, C. bactrianus) KW - Coccidiosis KW - Cystoisospora KW - Eimeria SP - 75 EP - 83 JF - Veterinary parasitology JO - Vet. Parasitol. VL - 262 N2 - Domesticated Old World camels (Camelus dromedarius and C. bactrianus) are important for the economy of several countries in Asia, Africa, and the Arabian Peninsula, and coccidiosis is important as a cause of mortality in juvenile camels. There is confusion concerning the species of coccidian parasites in camels and their life cycles. The objective of the present paper is to review biology of the Eimeria and Cystoisospora species in camels. The following conclusions were drawn. Although five species of Eimeria; E. cameli, E. rajasthani, E. dromedarii, E. bactriani, and E. pellerdyi were named from camels, only E. cameli, E. rajasthani, E. dromedarii have been consistently found in numerous surveys and they are morphologically distinct. We consider E. pellerdyi and E. bacterini as species enquirende/ not valid. E. cameli oocysts are distinctive, dark brown and up to 108 μm long. Its gametogonic stages and oocysts are present in the lamina propria of small intestines; only sexual stages have been confirmed. The remaining species of Eimeria (E. rajasthani and E. dromedarii) in camels are <40 μm long and their endogenous stages are unknown. There is one valid species of Cystoisospora, C. orlovi in camels and is associated with severe disease in young camels, both pastoral and stall fed camels. Camels as young as nine days old can develop severe diarrhea and can die before oocysts are detected in feces. Lesions and endogenous stages are confined to the large intestine. The main lesion is hemorrhagic, diphtheroid to hemorrhagic colitis-associated with sexual stages; asexual stages are unknown. Oocysts are rarely excreted by adult camels, and in low numbers. Therefore, infection in very young camels remains unexplained. SN - 1873-2550 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30389015/A_review_of_coccidiosis_in_Old_World_camels_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0304-4017(18)30297-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.