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Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation, Mental Health, and Bullying as Predictors of Partner Violence in a Representative Sample of Youth.
J Adolesc Health. 2019 01; 64(1):86-92.JA

Abstract

PURPOSE

Partner violence (PV) is prevalent among US adolescents, though little is known about its prevalence and correlates across gender identities and sexual orientations. Existing research has frequently placed lesbian, gay, bisexual (LGB), questioning, and transgender adolescents in the same category, obscuring potential differences in risk of PV.

METHODS

This study (N = 9,352) uses the 2015 Healthy Kids Colorado Study, a statewide representative survey, to explore how sexual orientation and gender identity are associated with PV victimization among high-school youth, and whether there is a relationship between mental health and bullying victimization and PV.

RESULTS

Out of all youth who dated in the past year, 9.4% reported experiencing past-year PV. Compared to their cisgender heterosexual peers, cisgender LGB youth (AOR = 1.48 [1.17, 1.86]) and cisgender questioning youth (AOR = 1.68 [1.13, 2.48]) had elevated risk of experiencing PV. Transgender youth, particularly those who are both transgender and LGB (AOR = 3.25 [2.02, 5.22]) or transgender and questioning their sexual orientation (AOR = 8.57 [4.28, 17.16]), had the highest risk of PV. Depressive symptoms (AOR = 1.99 [1.67, 2.37]), suicidality (AOR = 1.83 [1.62, 2.06]), bullying victimization (AOR = 1.58 [1.31, 1.91]), and online bullying victimization (AOR = 1.98 [1.62, 2.06]) were associated with PV.

CONCLUSIONS

LGB, questioning and transgender high school students are at elevated risk of PV, with the highest risk among those who are both LGB and transgender. Adolescents who report PV are also more likely to be struggling with bullying, depression, and suicidality. PV prevention and response interventions should use intersectional approaches responsive to the unique needs of LGBT youth.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Graduate School of Social Work, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado. Electronic address: Eugene.walls@du.edu.Graduate School of Social Work, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado.School of Social Work, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.School of Social Work, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.College of Social Work, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30392863

Citation

Walls, N Eugene, et al. "Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation, Mental Health, and Bullying as Predictors of Partner Violence in a Representative Sample of Youth." The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, vol. 64, no. 1, 2019, pp. 86-92.
Walls NE, Atteberry-Ash B, Kattari SK, et al. Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation, Mental Health, and Bullying as Predictors of Partner Violence in a Representative Sample of Youth. J Adolesc Health. 2019;64(1):86-92.
Walls, N. E., Atteberry-Ash, B., Kattari, S. K., Peitzmeier, S., Kattari, L., & Langenderfer-Magruder, L. (2019). Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation, Mental Health, and Bullying as Predictors of Partner Violence in a Representative Sample of Youth. The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, 64(1), 86-92. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2018.08.011
Walls NE, et al. Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation, Mental Health, and Bullying as Predictors of Partner Violence in a Representative Sample of Youth. J Adolesc Health. 2019;64(1):86-92. PubMed PMID: 30392863.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation, Mental Health, and Bullying as Predictors of Partner Violence in a Representative Sample of Youth. AU - Walls,N Eugene, AU - Atteberry-Ash,Brittanie, AU - Kattari,Shanna K, AU - Peitzmeier,Sarah, AU - Kattari,Leo, AU - Langenderfer-Magruder,Lisa, Y1 - 2018/11/02/ PY - 2018/05/15/received PY - 2018/07/24/revised PY - 2018/08/06/accepted PY - 2018/11/6/pubmed PY - 2020/4/2/medline PY - 2018/11/6/entrez KW - Bullying KW - Depression KW - Gender identity KW - Partner violence KW - Sexual orientation KW - Suicide SP - 86 EP - 92 JF - The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine JO - J Adolesc Health VL - 64 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: Partner violence (PV) is prevalent among US adolescents, though little is known about its prevalence and correlates across gender identities and sexual orientations. Existing research has frequently placed lesbian, gay, bisexual (LGB), questioning, and transgender adolescents in the same category, obscuring potential differences in risk of PV. METHODS: This study (N = 9,352) uses the 2015 Healthy Kids Colorado Study, a statewide representative survey, to explore how sexual orientation and gender identity are associated with PV victimization among high-school youth, and whether there is a relationship between mental health and bullying victimization and PV. RESULTS: Out of all youth who dated in the past year, 9.4% reported experiencing past-year PV. Compared to their cisgender heterosexual peers, cisgender LGB youth (AOR = 1.48 [1.17, 1.86]) and cisgender questioning youth (AOR = 1.68 [1.13, 2.48]) had elevated risk of experiencing PV. Transgender youth, particularly those who are both transgender and LGB (AOR = 3.25 [2.02, 5.22]) or transgender and questioning their sexual orientation (AOR = 8.57 [4.28, 17.16]), had the highest risk of PV. Depressive symptoms (AOR = 1.99 [1.67, 2.37]), suicidality (AOR = 1.83 [1.62, 2.06]), bullying victimization (AOR = 1.58 [1.31, 1.91]), and online bullying victimization (AOR = 1.98 [1.62, 2.06]) were associated with PV. CONCLUSIONS: LGB, questioning and transgender high school students are at elevated risk of PV, with the highest risk among those who are both LGB and transgender. Adolescents who report PV are also more likely to be struggling with bullying, depression, and suicidality. PV prevention and response interventions should use intersectional approaches responsive to the unique needs of LGBT youth. SN - 1879-1972 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30392863/Gender_Identity_Sexual_Orientation_Mental_Health_and_Bullying_as_Predictors_of_Partner_Violence_in_a_Representative_Sample_of_Youth_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1054-139X(18)30394-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -