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Randomized, crossover, sham-controlled, double-blind study of transcranial direct current stimulation of left DLPFC on executive functions .
Restor Neurol Neurosci. 2018; 36(6):755-766.RN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique commonly used to modulate cognitive functions; so-called "anodal" stimulation is considered to increase cortical excitability while "cathodal" stimulation is presumed to have the opposite result. Yet, a growing number of recent studies question the robustness of this polarity-dependent effect, namely because of the important inter-individual variability with regards to tDCS modulatory effects. A plausible reason for this heterogenous response may lay in task impurity issues in the evaluation of cognitive functions.

OBJECTIVE

To address the question of task impurity the NIH-Examiner, a neuropsychological test battery that uses latent variables, which assess the common variance across multiple measures of a given concept, was administered to 24 healthy individuals following tDCS. This battery contains 11 tasks and provides latent variables for general executive functioning, fluency, cognitive control and working memory.

METHODS

Anodal, cathodal, and sham stimulation (20 minutes, 1.5 mA) was administered over left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and right supra-orbital area in a randomized, crossover, sham-controlled, double blind protocol.

RESULTS

Factorial scores and task performance indices of executive function were not modulated by tDCS.

CONCLUSIONS

Offline tDCS has limited impact on executive functions at both the task and factorial levels. This suggests that reducing task impurity does not increase the effectiveness of tDCS in modulating cognitive functions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Université de Montréal, Department of Psychology, Montréal, Canada.Université du Québec à Montréal, Department of Psychology, Montréal, Canada.Université de Montréal, Department of Psychology, Montréal, Canada. Research Center, CHU Ste-Justine, Montréal, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30412514

Citation

Dumont, Laurence, et al. "Randomized, Crossover, Sham-controlled, Double-blind Study of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of Left DLPFC On Executive Functions ." Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, vol. 36, no. 6, 2018, pp. 755-766.
Dumont L, El Mouderrib S, Théoret H. Randomized, crossover, sham-controlled, double-blind study of transcranial direct current stimulation of left DLPFC on executive functions . Restor Neurol Neurosci. 2018;36(6):755-766.
Dumont, L., El Mouderrib, S., & Théoret, H. (2018). Randomized, crossover, sham-controlled, double-blind study of transcranial direct current stimulation of left DLPFC on executive functions . Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, 36(6), 755-766. https://doi.org/10.3233/RNN-180872
Dumont L, El Mouderrib S, Théoret H. Randomized, Crossover, Sham-controlled, Double-blind Study of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of Left DLPFC On Executive Functions. Restor Neurol Neurosci. 2018;36(6):755-766. PubMed PMID: 30412514.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Randomized, crossover, sham-controlled, double-blind study of transcranial direct current stimulation of left DLPFC on executive functions . AU - Dumont,Laurence, AU - El Mouderrib,Sofia, AU - Théoret,Hugo, PY - 2018/11/10/pubmed PY - 2019/4/2/medline PY - 2018/11/10/entrez KW - Executive functions KW - NIH-Examiner KW - frontal cortex KW - latent variables KW - transcranial direct current stimulation SP - 755 EP - 766 JF - Restorative neurology and neuroscience JO - Restor Neurol Neurosci VL - 36 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique commonly used to modulate cognitive functions; so-called "anodal" stimulation is considered to increase cortical excitability while "cathodal" stimulation is presumed to have the opposite result. Yet, a growing number of recent studies question the robustness of this polarity-dependent effect, namely because of the important inter-individual variability with regards to tDCS modulatory effects. A plausible reason for this heterogenous response may lay in task impurity issues in the evaluation of cognitive functions. OBJECTIVE: To address the question of task impurity the NIH-Examiner, a neuropsychological test battery that uses latent variables, which assess the common variance across multiple measures of a given concept, was administered to 24 healthy individuals following tDCS. This battery contains 11 tasks and provides latent variables for general executive functioning, fluency, cognitive control and working memory. METHODS: Anodal, cathodal, and sham stimulation (20 minutes, 1.5 mA) was administered over left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and right supra-orbital area in a randomized, crossover, sham-controlled, double blind protocol. RESULTS: Factorial scores and task performance indices of executive function were not modulated by tDCS. CONCLUSIONS: Offline tDCS has limited impact on executive functions at both the task and factorial levels. This suggests that reducing task impurity does not increase the effectiveness of tDCS in modulating cognitive functions. SN - 1878-3627 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30412514/Randomized_crossover_sham_controlled_double_blind_study_of_transcranial_direct_current_stimulation_of_left_DLPFC_on_executive_functions__ L2 - https://content.iospress.com/openurl?genre=article&id=doi:10.3233/RNN-180872 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -