Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A Comparison of High School Boys' and Girls' Lacrosse Injuries: Academic Years 2008-2009 Through 2015-2016.
J Athl Train. 2018 Nov; 53(11):1049-1055.JA

Abstract

CONTEXT

The sex-based differences in the structure and rules of boys' and girls' lacrosse result in very different styles of play, which may have significant implications for the rates and patterns of injuries.

OBJECTIVE

To compare the epidemiology of injuries sustained by boys' and girls' lacrosse players.

DESIGN

Descriptive epidemiology study.

SETTING

Web-based online surveillance system.

PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS

The High School Reporting Information Online database was used to analyze injuries reported by certified athletic trainers from 2008-2009 through 2015-2016.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S)

Practice and competition injury rates, body site, diagnosis, and mechanism.

RESULTS

Boys had a higher injury rate than girls (20.9 versus 15.7 per 10 000 athlete-exposures, respectively; rate ratio = 1.3, 95% confidence interval = 1.2, 1.4). The most commonly injured body sites for boys and girls, respectively, were the lower extremities (38.0%, 56.4%) and the head/neck (28.3%, 29.8%). More specifically, the most frequently diagnosed injuries for both boys and girls, respectively, in competitions were concussions (23.1%, 25.6%), ankle ligament sprains (7.8%, 15.3%), upper leg strains (4.8%, 6.7%), and knee ligament sprains (4.2%, 6.7%). The most cited mechanism of injury overall was contact with another player (22.0%); among boys, it was contact with a stick (14.8%) and among girls, the most frequent mechanisms were overuse (25.0%) and contact with a stick (14.7%).

CONCLUSIONS

Injury rates and mechanisms of injuries differed between high school boys' and girls' lacrosse players. Boys had a higher rate of injury, with the most common mechanism of injury being contact with another player compared with overuse in girls. However, similarities were seen between sexes for the most frequently injured body sites and injury diagnoses. Future authors should continue to compare differences in injury rates, equipment upgrades, and rule changes in boys' and girls' lacrosse.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Michigan State University, East Lansing.Michigan State University, East Lansing.Michigan State University, East Lansing.Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora.Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora.Michigan State University, East Lansing.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30451536

Citation

Warner, Keegan, et al. "A Comparison of High School Boys' and Girls' Lacrosse Injuries: Academic Years 2008-2009 Through 2015-2016." Journal of Athletic Training, vol. 53, no. 11, 2018, pp. 1049-1055.
Warner K, Savage J, Kuenze CM, et al. A Comparison of High School Boys' and Girls' Lacrosse Injuries: Academic Years 2008-2009 Through 2015-2016. J Athl Train. 2018;53(11):1049-1055.
Warner, K., Savage, J., Kuenze, C. M., Erkenbeck, A., Comstock, R. D., & Covassin, T. (2018). A Comparison of High School Boys' and Girls' Lacrosse Injuries: Academic Years 2008-2009 Through 2015-2016. Journal of Athletic Training, 53(11), 1049-1055. https://doi.org/10.4085/1062-6050-312-17
Warner K, et al. A Comparison of High School Boys' and Girls' Lacrosse Injuries: Academic Years 2008-2009 Through 2015-2016. J Athl Train. 2018;53(11):1049-1055. PubMed PMID: 30451536.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A Comparison of High School Boys' and Girls' Lacrosse Injuries: Academic Years 2008-2009 Through 2015-2016. AU - Warner,Keegan, AU - Savage,Jennifer, AU - Kuenze,Christopher M, AU - Erkenbeck,Alexandria, AU - Comstock,R Dawn, AU - Covassin,Tracey, Y1 - 2018/11/19/ PY - 2018/11/20/pubmed PY - 2019/2/15/medline PY - 2018/11/20/entrez KW - injury rates KW - injury surveillance KW - sex differences SP - 1049 EP - 1055 JF - Journal of athletic training JO - J Athl Train VL - 53 IS - 11 N2 - CONTEXT: The sex-based differences in the structure and rules of boys' and girls' lacrosse result in very different styles of play, which may have significant implications for the rates and patterns of injuries. OBJECTIVE: To compare the epidemiology of injuries sustained by boys' and girls' lacrosse players. DESIGN: Descriptive epidemiology study. SETTING: Web-based online surveillance system. PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS: The High School Reporting Information Online database was used to analyze injuries reported by certified athletic trainers from 2008-2009 through 2015-2016. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Practice and competition injury rates, body site, diagnosis, and mechanism. RESULTS: Boys had a higher injury rate than girls (20.9 versus 15.7 per 10 000 athlete-exposures, respectively; rate ratio = 1.3, 95% confidence interval = 1.2, 1.4). The most commonly injured body sites for boys and girls, respectively, were the lower extremities (38.0%, 56.4%) and the head/neck (28.3%, 29.8%). More specifically, the most frequently diagnosed injuries for both boys and girls, respectively, in competitions were concussions (23.1%, 25.6%), ankle ligament sprains (7.8%, 15.3%), upper leg strains (4.8%, 6.7%), and knee ligament sprains (4.2%, 6.7%). The most cited mechanism of injury overall was contact with another player (22.0%); among boys, it was contact with a stick (14.8%) and among girls, the most frequent mechanisms were overuse (25.0%) and contact with a stick (14.7%). CONCLUSIONS: Injury rates and mechanisms of injuries differed between high school boys' and girls' lacrosse players. Boys had a higher rate of injury, with the most common mechanism of injury being contact with another player compared with overuse in girls. However, similarities were seen between sexes for the most frequently injured body sites and injury diagnoses. Future authors should continue to compare differences in injury rates, equipment upgrades, and rule changes in boys' and girls' lacrosse. SN - 1938-162X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30451536/A_Comparison_of_High_School_Boys'_and_Girls'_Lacrosse_Injuries:_Academic_Years_2008_2009_Through_2015_2016_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/30451536/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -