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Short-Term Intensive Therapy and Outcomes for Athletes With Paradoxical Vocal Fold Motion Disorder.
Am J Speech Lang Pathol. 2019 02 21; 28(1):83-95.AJ

Abstract

Purpose The aim of the study was to develop a treatment for athletes with paradoxical vocal fold motion disorder (PVFMD) based on exercise physiology and learning theory principles and administer it over a preestablished time frame. Method A prospective, repeated-measures, within-subject group design was used. Eleven adolescent/teen athletes diagnosed with PVFMD via laryngoscopy received short-term intensive (STI) therapy. Eight of the athletes returned for extended follow-up. Changes in postexercise inspiratory (R i) and expiratory (R e) resistances and Modified Borg Dyspnea Scale (MBDS) ratings collected at baseline were compared immediately posttreatment and at extended follow-up. Dyspnea Index scores were collected at baseline and at extended follow-up. Two no-treatment control athletes with PVFMD participated in two exercise challenges-baseline and 6 weeks later. Results Immediately after STI therapy, athletes attained significant improvement in R i, R e, and MBDS ratings. These changes were maintained at extended follow-up as well as a significant change in Dyspnea Index scores. The 2 control athletes who were reassessed 6 weeks after baseline experienced negative changes in postexercise R i and MBDS ratings. Conclusion STI therapy that incorporated individuality, specificity, and variable practice effectively changed outcome measures posttreatment with further improvement observed at extended follow-up. These results provide preliminary evidence for STI therapy for PVFMD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Loyola University Maryland, Baltimore.Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland, College Park.Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland, College Park. Engineering and Scientific Research Associates, Brookeville, MD.

Pub Type(s)

Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30453332

Citation

Gallena, Sally K., et al. "Short-Term Intensive Therapy and Outcomes for Athletes With Paradoxical Vocal Fold Motion Disorder." American Journal of Speech-language Pathology, vol. 28, no. 1, 2019, pp. 83-95.
Gallena SK, Johnson AT, Vossoughi J. Short-Term Intensive Therapy and Outcomes for Athletes With Paradoxical Vocal Fold Motion Disorder. Am J Speech Lang Pathol. 2019;28(1):83-95.
Gallena, S. K., Johnson, A. T., & Vossoughi, J. (2019). Short-Term Intensive Therapy and Outcomes for Athletes With Paradoxical Vocal Fold Motion Disorder. American Journal of Speech-language Pathology, 28(1), 83-95. https://doi.org/10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0223
Gallena SK, Johnson AT, Vossoughi J. Short-Term Intensive Therapy and Outcomes for Athletes With Paradoxical Vocal Fold Motion Disorder. Am J Speech Lang Pathol. 2019 02 21;28(1):83-95. PubMed PMID: 30453332.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Short-Term Intensive Therapy and Outcomes for Athletes With Paradoxical Vocal Fold Motion Disorder. AU - Gallena,Sally K, AU - Johnson,Arthur T, AU - Vossoughi,Jafar, PY - 2018/11/20/pubmed PY - 2020/3/31/medline PY - 2018/11/20/entrez SP - 83 EP - 95 JF - American journal of speech-language pathology JO - Am J Speech Lang Pathol VL - 28 IS - 1 N2 - Purpose The aim of the study was to develop a treatment for athletes with paradoxical vocal fold motion disorder (PVFMD) based on exercise physiology and learning theory principles and administer it over a preestablished time frame. Method A prospective, repeated-measures, within-subject group design was used. Eleven adolescent/teen athletes diagnosed with PVFMD via laryngoscopy received short-term intensive (STI) therapy. Eight of the athletes returned for extended follow-up. Changes in postexercise inspiratory (R i) and expiratory (R e) resistances and Modified Borg Dyspnea Scale (MBDS) ratings collected at baseline were compared immediately posttreatment and at extended follow-up. Dyspnea Index scores were collected at baseline and at extended follow-up. Two no-treatment control athletes with PVFMD participated in two exercise challenges-baseline and 6 weeks later. Results Immediately after STI therapy, athletes attained significant improvement in R i, R e, and MBDS ratings. These changes were maintained at extended follow-up as well as a significant change in Dyspnea Index scores. The 2 control athletes who were reassessed 6 weeks after baseline experienced negative changes in postexercise R i and MBDS ratings. Conclusion STI therapy that incorporated individuality, specificity, and variable practice effectively changed outcome measures posttreatment with further improvement observed at extended follow-up. These results provide preliminary evidence for STI therapy for PVFMD. SN - 1558-9110 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30453332/Short_Term_Intensive_Therapy_and_Outcomes_for_Athletes_With_Paradoxical_Vocal_Fold_Motion_Disorder_ L2 - https://pubs.asha.org/doi/full/10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0223?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -