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[Relations between pregestational body mass index, gestational weight gain and birth weight of neonates among women in the Southwest areas of China: A prospective cohort study].
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi. 2018 Oct 10; 39(10):1319-1323.ZL

Abstract

Objective:

To explore the effects of both pre-gestational BMI and gestational weight gain (GWG) on the birth weight of neonates.

Methods:

A total of 5 395 pregnant women were selected from the Southwest areas of China (Sichuan/Yunnan/Guizhou) and were divided into groups as pre-gestational underweight, normal weight, overweight and obesity, according to the WHO Recommendation on BMI Classification. Guidelines on Pregnancy weight were adopted from the Institute of Medicine to confirm the accuracy of GWG. Multinomial logistic regression model was used to assess the associations between pregestational BMI and GWG, on the birth weight of the neonates.

Results:

After adjusting for related confounders, low pre-gestational BMI appeared as a risk factor for SGA (OR=1.91, 95%CI: 1.47-2.50), and was also associated with the decreased risk of LGA (OR=0.55, 95%CI: 0.47-0.66). Inadequate GWG was both associated with the increased risk of delivering SGA (OR=1.57, 95%CI: 1.21-2.03) and the decreased risk of LGA (OR=0.48, 95%CI: 0.41-0.57). Pre-gestational overweight/obesity (OR=1.85, 95%CI: 1.58-2.17) and excessive GWG (OR=1.87, 95%CI: 1.67- 2.11) were both positively associated with the risks on LGA. Data from the stratified analysis indicated that inadequate GWG was positively associated with the risk of SGA among underweight or normal weight women (all P<0.05), but not with those overweight/obese women.

Conclusions:

Pre-gestational BMI and GWG were important influencing factors on the birth weight of neonates. Health education programs for pregnant women should be intensified and gestational weight gain should also be reasonably under control.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Food Safety and Toxicology, West China School of Public Health.Department of Nutrition, Food Safety and Toxicology, West China School of Public Health.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, West China Second University Hospital.Department of Nutrition, Food Safety and Toxicology, West China School of Public Health.Department of Nutrition, Food Safety and Toxicology, West China School of Public Health.Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China; Department of Clinical Nutrition, Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, Guiyang 550001, China.Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China; Department of Clinical Nutrition, Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, Guiyang 550001, China.Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China; Department of Clinical Nutrition, Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, Guiyang 550001, China.Department of Nutrition, Food Safety and Toxicology, West China School of Public Health.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

chi

PubMed ID

30453430

Citation

Li, D T., et al. "[Relations Between Pregestational Body Mass Index, Gestational Weight Gain and Birth Weight of Neonates Among Women in the Southwest Areas of China: a Prospective Cohort Study]." Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi = Zhonghua Liuxingbingxue Zazhi, vol. 39, no. 10, 2018, pp. 1319-1323.
Li DT, Liang Y, Gong YH, et al. [Relations between pregestational body mass index, gestational weight gain and birth weight of neonates among women in the Southwest areas of China: A prospective cohort study]. Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi. 2018;39(10):1319-1323.
Li, D. T., Liang, Y., Gong, Y. H., Chen, M. X., Feng, P., Yang, D. G., Yang, W. Y., Liu, Y., & Cheng, G. (2018). [Relations between pregestational body mass index, gestational weight gain and birth weight of neonates among women in the Southwest areas of China: A prospective cohort study]. Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi = Zhonghua Liuxingbingxue Zazhi, 39(10), 1319-1323. https://doi.org/10.3760/cma.j.issn.0254-6450.2018.10.006
Li DT, et al. [Relations Between Pregestational Body Mass Index, Gestational Weight Gain and Birth Weight of Neonates Among Women in the Southwest Areas of China: a Prospective Cohort Study]. Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi. 2018 Oct 10;39(10):1319-1323. PubMed PMID: 30453430.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Relations between pregestational body mass index, gestational weight gain and birth weight of neonates among women in the Southwest areas of China: A prospective cohort study]. AU - Li,D T, AU - Liang,Y, AU - Gong,Y H, AU - Chen,M X, AU - Feng,P, AU - Yang,D G, AU - Yang,W Y, AU - Liu,Y, AU - Cheng,G, PY - 2018/11/20/entrez PY - 2018/11/20/pubmed PY - 2019/2/28/medline KW - Birth weight KW - Body mass index KW - Gestational weight gain KW - Neonate SP - 1319 EP - 1323 JF - Zhonghua liu xing bing xue za zhi = Zhonghua liuxingbingxue zazhi JO - Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi VL - 39 IS - 10 N2 - Objective: To explore the effects of both pre-gestational BMI and gestational weight gain (GWG) on the birth weight of neonates. Methods: A total of 5 395 pregnant women were selected from the Southwest areas of China (Sichuan/Yunnan/Guizhou) and were divided into groups as pre-gestational underweight, normal weight, overweight and obesity, according to the WHO Recommendation on BMI Classification. Guidelines on Pregnancy weight were adopted from the Institute of Medicine to confirm the accuracy of GWG. Multinomial logistic regression model was used to assess the associations between pregestational BMI and GWG, on the birth weight of the neonates. Results: After adjusting for related confounders, low pre-gestational BMI appeared as a risk factor for SGA (OR=1.91, 95%CI: 1.47-2.50), and was also associated with the decreased risk of LGA (OR=0.55, 95%CI: 0.47-0.66). Inadequate GWG was both associated with the increased risk of delivering SGA (OR=1.57, 95%CI: 1.21-2.03) and the decreased risk of LGA (OR=0.48, 95%CI: 0.41-0.57). Pre-gestational overweight/obesity (OR=1.85, 95%CI: 1.58-2.17) and excessive GWG (OR=1.87, 95%CI: 1.67- 2.11) were both positively associated with the risks on LGA. Data from the stratified analysis indicated that inadequate GWG was positively associated with the risk of SGA among underweight or normal weight women (all P<0.05), but not with those overweight/obese women. Conclusions: Pre-gestational BMI and GWG were important influencing factors on the birth weight of neonates. Health education programs for pregnant women should be intensified and gestational weight gain should also be reasonably under control. SN - 0254-6450 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30453430/[Relations_between_pregestational_body_mass_index_gestational_weight_gain_and_birth_weight_of_neonates_among_women_in_the_Southwest_areas_of_China:_A_prospective_cohort_study]_ L2 - http://journal.yiigle.com/LinkIn.do?linkin_type=pubmed&amp;issn=0254-6450&amp;year=2018&amp;vol=39&amp;issue=10&amp;fpage=1319 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -