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Multifunctional Mechanical Sensors for Versatile Physiological Signal Detection.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces 2018; 10(50):44173-44182AA

Abstract

Recently, flexible and wearable mechanical sensors have attracted great attention because of their potential applications in monitoring various physiological signals. However, conventional mechanical sensors rarely have both pressure and strain sensing abilities that can meet the demands of both subtle and large human motion detection. Besides, the mechanical sensors with tunable sensitivity or measuring range are also essential for their practical applications. Herein, the graphene ink dip-coating method with merits of time saving, low cost, and large scale was used to fabricate the foam-structured graphene sensors with both pressure and strain sensing performance. Because of high elasticity of styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) substrates and stacked graphene flakes, the tunable mechanical sensors exhibit a high gauge factor (GF) and large measuring range for specific human motion detection. The pressure sensor shows a GF of 2.02 kPa-1 with a pressure range up to 172 kPa, and the strain sensor displays a GF of 250 with a strain range up to 86%. On the one hand, various detections of subtle vital signals with small strain change were demonstrated by the pressure sensor because of its flexibility and high sensitivity. On another hand, the strain sensor with large strain change shows excellent ability to detect various large human motions including the bending of neck, finger, wrist, and knee. Interestingly, both the pressure sensor and strain sensor exhibit great capability for recognizing 26 letters written by hand. The working mechanism based on the contact area variation was also investigated by the morphology evolution and resistance model. We suppose that the foam-structured graphene mechanical sensors would be promising in wearable electronics for human healthcare and activity monitoring in the future.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30465422

Citation

Pang, Yu, et al. "Multifunctional Mechanical Sensors for Versatile Physiological Signal Detection." ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, vol. 10, no. 50, 2018, pp. 44173-44182.
Pang Y, Yang Z, Han X, et al. Multifunctional Mechanical Sensors for Versatile Physiological Signal Detection. ACS Appl Mater Interfaces. 2018;10(50):44173-44182.
Pang, Y., Yang, Z., Han, X., Jian, J., Li, Y., Wang, X., ... Ren, T. L. (2018). Multifunctional Mechanical Sensors for Versatile Physiological Signal Detection. ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, 10(50), pp. 44173-44182. doi:10.1021/acsami.8b16237.
Pang Y, et al. Multifunctional Mechanical Sensors for Versatile Physiological Signal Detection. ACS Appl Mater Interfaces. 2018 Dec 19;10(50):44173-44182. PubMed PMID: 30465422.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Multifunctional Mechanical Sensors for Versatile Physiological Signal Detection. AU - Pang,Yu, AU - Yang,Zhen, AU - Han,Xiaolin, AU - Jian,Jinming, AU - Li,Yuxing, AU - Wang,Xuefeng, AU - Qiao,Yancong, AU - Yang,Yi, AU - Ren,Tian-Ling, Y1 - 2018/12/04/ PY - 2018/11/23/pubmed PY - 2019/6/18/medline PY - 2018/11/23/entrez KW - foam structure KW - graphene KW - physiological signals KW - pressure sensor KW - strain sensor SP - 44173 EP - 44182 JF - ACS applied materials & interfaces JO - ACS Appl Mater Interfaces VL - 10 IS - 50 N2 - Recently, flexible and wearable mechanical sensors have attracted great attention because of their potential applications in monitoring various physiological signals. However, conventional mechanical sensors rarely have both pressure and strain sensing abilities that can meet the demands of both subtle and large human motion detection. Besides, the mechanical sensors with tunable sensitivity or measuring range are also essential for their practical applications. Herein, the graphene ink dip-coating method with merits of time saving, low cost, and large scale was used to fabricate the foam-structured graphene sensors with both pressure and strain sensing performance. Because of high elasticity of styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) substrates and stacked graphene flakes, the tunable mechanical sensors exhibit a high gauge factor (GF) and large measuring range for specific human motion detection. The pressure sensor shows a GF of 2.02 kPa-1 with a pressure range up to 172 kPa, and the strain sensor displays a GF of 250 with a strain range up to 86%. On the one hand, various detections of subtle vital signals with small strain change were demonstrated by the pressure sensor because of its flexibility and high sensitivity. On another hand, the strain sensor with large strain change shows excellent ability to detect various large human motions including the bending of neck, finger, wrist, and knee. Interestingly, both the pressure sensor and strain sensor exhibit great capability for recognizing 26 letters written by hand. The working mechanism based on the contact area variation was also investigated by the morphology evolution and resistance model. We suppose that the foam-structured graphene mechanical sensors would be promising in wearable electronics for human healthcare and activity monitoring in the future. SN - 1944-8252 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30465422/Multifunctional_Mechanical_Sensors_for_Versatile_Physiological_Signal_Detection_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsami.8b16237 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -