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Sex differences in risk factors for vascular contributions to cognitive impairment & dementia.
Neurochem Int. 2019 07; 127:38-55.NI

Abstract

Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) is the second most common cause of dementia. While males overall appear to be at a slightly higher risk for VCID throughout most of the lifespan (up to age 85), some risk factors for VCID more adversely affect women. These include female-specific risk factors associated with pregnancy related disorders (e.g. preeclampsia), menopause, and poorly timed hormone replacement. Further, presence of certain co-morbid risk factors, such as diabetes, obesity and hypertension, also may more adversely affect women than men. In contrast, some risk factors more greatly affect men, such as hyperlipidemia, myocardial infarction, and heart disease. Further, stroke, one of the leading risk factors for VCID, has a higher incidence in men than in women throughout much of the lifespan, though this trend is reversed at advanced ages. This review will highlight the need to take biological sex and common co-morbidities for VCID into account in both preclinical and clinical research. Given that there are currently no treatments available for VCID, it is critical that we understand how to mitigate risk factors for this devastating disease in both sexes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neuroscience and Experimental Therapeutics, Albany Medical College, 47 New Scotland Ave, Albany, NY, 12208, USA. Electronic address: gannono@amc.edu.Department of Neuroscience and Experimental Therapeutics, Albany Medical College, 47 New Scotland Ave, Albany, NY, 12208, USA. Electronic address: robisol@amc.edu.Department of Neuroscience and Experimental Therapeutics, Albany Medical College, 47 New Scotland Ave, Albany, NY, 12208, USA. Electronic address: custoza@amc.edu.Department of Neuroscience and Experimental Therapeutics, Albany Medical College, 47 New Scotland Ave, Albany, NY, 12208, USA. Electronic address: zuloagk@amc.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30471324

Citation

Gannon, O J., et al. "Sex Differences in Risk Factors for Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment & Dementia." Neurochemistry International, vol. 127, 2019, pp. 38-55.
Gannon OJ, Robison LS, Custozzo AJ, et al. Sex differences in risk factors for vascular contributions to cognitive impairment & dementia. Neurochem Int. 2019;127:38-55.
Gannon, O. J., Robison, L. S., Custozzo, A. J., & Zuloaga, K. L. (2019). Sex differences in risk factors for vascular contributions to cognitive impairment & dementia. Neurochemistry International, 127, 38-55. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuint.2018.11.014
Gannon OJ, et al. Sex Differences in Risk Factors for Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment & Dementia. Neurochem Int. 2019;127:38-55. PubMed PMID: 30471324.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sex differences in risk factors for vascular contributions to cognitive impairment & dementia. AU - Gannon,O J, AU - Robison,L S, AU - Custozzo,A J, AU - Zuloaga,K L, Y1 - 2018/11/22/ PY - 2018/09/27/received PY - 2018/11/16/revised PY - 2018/11/16/accepted PY - 2018/11/25/pubmed PY - 2020/1/3/medline PY - 2018/11/25/entrez KW - Hormone replacement therapy KW - Menopause KW - Metabolic disease KW - Sex KW - Stroke KW - Vascular dementia SP - 38 EP - 55 JF - Neurochemistry international JO - Neurochem Int VL - 127 N2 - Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) is the second most common cause of dementia. While males overall appear to be at a slightly higher risk for VCID throughout most of the lifespan (up to age 85), some risk factors for VCID more adversely affect women. These include female-specific risk factors associated with pregnancy related disorders (e.g. preeclampsia), menopause, and poorly timed hormone replacement. Further, presence of certain co-morbid risk factors, such as diabetes, obesity and hypertension, also may more adversely affect women than men. In contrast, some risk factors more greatly affect men, such as hyperlipidemia, myocardial infarction, and heart disease. Further, stroke, one of the leading risk factors for VCID, has a higher incidence in men than in women throughout much of the lifespan, though this trend is reversed at advanced ages. This review will highlight the need to take biological sex and common co-morbidities for VCID into account in both preclinical and clinical research. Given that there are currently no treatments available for VCID, it is critical that we understand how to mitigate risk factors for this devastating disease in both sexes. SN - 1872-9754 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30471324/Sex_differences_in_risk_factors_for_vascular_contributions_to_cognitive_impairment_&_dementia_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0197-0186(18)30511-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -