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Associations of adverse childhood experiences and social support with self-injurious behaviour and suicidality in adolescents.
Br J Psychiatry. 2019 03; 214(3):146-152.BJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There is little investigation on the interaction effects of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and social support on non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), suicidal ideation and suicide attempt in community adolescent populations, or gender differences in these effects.AimsTo examine the individual and interaction effects of ACEs and social support on NSSI, suicidal ideation and suicide attempt in adolescents, and explore gender differences.

METHOD

A school-based health survey was conducted in three provinces in China between 2013-2014. A total of 14 820 students aged 10-20 years completed standard questionnaires, to record details of ACEs, social support, NSSI, suicidal ideation and suicide attempt.

RESULTS

Of included participants, 89.4% reported one or more category of ACEs. The 12-month prevalence of NSSI, suicidal ideation and suicide attempt was 26.1%, 17.5% and 4.4%, respectively; all were significantly associated with increased ACEs and lower social support. The multiple adjusted odds ratio of NSSI in low versus high social support was 2.27 (95% CI 1.85-2.67) for girls and 1.81 (95% CI 1.53-2.14) for boys, and their ratio (Ratio of two odds ratios, ROR) was 1.25 (P = 0.037). Girls with high ACEs scores (5-6) and moderate or low social support also had a higher risk of suicide attempt than boys (RORs: 2.34, 1.84 and 2.02, respectively; all P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

ACEs and low social support are associated with increased risk of NSSI and suicidality in Chinese adolescents. Strategies to improve social support, particularly among female adolescents with a high number of ACEs, should be an integral component of targeted mental health interventions.Declaration of interestNone.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Associated Professor,Department of Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health,School of Public Health,Anhui Medical University,China,Anhui Provincial Key Laboratory of Population Health and Aristogenics,Anhui Medical University, China and Faculty of Education,Health and Wellbeing,University of Wolverhampton,UK.Professor,Faculty of Education,Health and Wellbeing,University of Wolverhampton,UK.Student,Department of Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health,School of Public Health,Anhui Medical UniversityandAnhui Provincial Key Laboratory of Population Health and Aristogenics, Anhui Medical University,China.Fellow,Faculty of Education,Health and Wellbeing,University of Wolverhampton,UK.Associated Professor,Department of Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health,School of Public Health,Anhui Medical UniversityandAnhui Provincial Key Laboratory of Population Health and Aristogenics, Anhui Medical University,China.Professor, Department of Maternal,Child and Adolescent Health,School of Public Health,Anhui Medical UniversityandAnhui Provincial Key Laboratory of Population Health and Aristogenics, Anhui Medical University,China.Professor, Department of Maternal,Child and Adolescent Health,School of Public Health,Anhui Medical UniversityandAnhui Provincial Key Laboratory of Population Health and Aristogenics, Anhui Medical University,China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30477603

Citation

Wan, Yuhui, et al. "Associations of Adverse Childhood Experiences and Social Support With Self-injurious Behaviour and Suicidality in Adolescents." The British Journal of Psychiatry : the Journal of Mental Science, vol. 214, no. 3, 2019, pp. 146-152.
Wan Y, Chen R, Ma S, et al. Associations of adverse childhood experiences and social support with self-injurious behaviour and suicidality in adolescents. Br J Psychiatry. 2019;214(3):146-152.
Wan, Y., Chen, R., Ma, S., McFeeters, D., Sun, Y., Hao, J., & Tao, F. (2019). Associations of adverse childhood experiences and social support with self-injurious behaviour and suicidality in adolescents. The British Journal of Psychiatry : the Journal of Mental Science, 214(3), 146-152. https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.2018.263
Wan Y, et al. Associations of Adverse Childhood Experiences and Social Support With Self-injurious Behaviour and Suicidality in Adolescents. Br J Psychiatry. 2019;214(3):146-152. PubMed PMID: 30477603.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations of adverse childhood experiences and social support with self-injurious behaviour and suicidality in adolescents. AU - Wan,Yuhui, AU - Chen,Ruoling, AU - Ma,Shuangshuang, AU - McFeeters,Danielle, AU - Sun,Ying, AU - Hao,Jiahu, AU - Tao,Fangbiao, Y1 - 2018/11/27/ PY - 2018/11/28/pubmed PY - 2020/2/8/medline PY - 2018/11/28/entrez KW - Adverse childhood experiences KW - non-suicidal self-injury KW - social support KW - suicidal ideation KW - suicide attempt SP - 146 EP - 152 JF - The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science JO - Br J Psychiatry VL - 214 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: There is little investigation on the interaction effects of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and social support on non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), suicidal ideation and suicide attempt in community adolescent populations, or gender differences in these effects.AimsTo examine the individual and interaction effects of ACEs and social support on NSSI, suicidal ideation and suicide attempt in adolescents, and explore gender differences. METHOD: A school-based health survey was conducted in three provinces in China between 2013-2014. A total of 14 820 students aged 10-20 years completed standard questionnaires, to record details of ACEs, social support, NSSI, suicidal ideation and suicide attempt. RESULTS: Of included participants, 89.4% reported one or more category of ACEs. The 12-month prevalence of NSSI, suicidal ideation and suicide attempt was 26.1%, 17.5% and 4.4%, respectively; all were significantly associated with increased ACEs and lower social support. The multiple adjusted odds ratio of NSSI in low versus high social support was 2.27 (95% CI 1.85-2.67) for girls and 1.81 (95% CI 1.53-2.14) for boys, and their ratio (Ratio of two odds ratios, ROR) was 1.25 (P = 0.037). Girls with high ACEs scores (5-6) and moderate or low social support also had a higher risk of suicide attempt than boys (RORs: 2.34, 1.84 and 2.02, respectively; all P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: ACEs and low social support are associated with increased risk of NSSI and suicidality in Chinese adolescents. Strategies to improve social support, particularly among female adolescents with a high number of ACEs, should be an integral component of targeted mental health interventions.Declaration of interestNone. SN - 1472-1465 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30477603/Associations_of_adverse_childhood_experiences_and_social_support_with_self_injurious_behaviour_and_suicidality_in_adolescents_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007125018002635/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -