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Controlling the distance of highly confined droplets in a capillary by interfacial tension for merging on-demand.
Lab Chip. 2018 12 18; 19(1):136-146.LC

Abstract

Droplet microfluidics is a powerful technology that finds many applications in chemistry and biomedicine. Among different configurations, droplets confined in a capillary (or plugs) present a number of advantages: they allow positional identification and simplify the integration of complex multi-steps protocols. However, these protocols rely on the control of droplet speed, which is affected by a complex and still debated interplay of various physico-chemical parameters like droplet length, viscosity ratio between droplets and carrier fluid, flow rate and interfacial tension. We present here a systematic investigation of the droplet speed as a function of their length and interfacial tension, and propose a novel, simple and robust methodology to control the relative distance between consecutive droplets flowing in microfluidic channels through the addition of surfactants either into the dispersed and/or into the continuous phases. As a proof of concept application, we present the possibility to accurately trigger in space and time the merging of two confined droplets flowing in a uniform cross-section circular capillary. This approach is further validated by monitoring a conventional enzymatic reaction used to quantify the concentration of H2O2 in a biological sample, showing its potentialities in both continuous and stopped assay methods.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia G. Galilei, Università di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova, Italy. giampaolo.mistura@unipd.it.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30484796

Citation

Ferraro, D, et al. "Controlling the Distance of Highly Confined Droplets in a Capillary By Interfacial Tension for Merging On-demand." Lab On a Chip, vol. 19, no. 1, 2018, pp. 136-146.
Ferraro D, Serra M, Filippi D, et al. Controlling the distance of highly confined droplets in a capillary by interfacial tension for merging on-demand. Lab Chip. 2018;19(1):136-146.
Ferraro, D., Serra, M., Filippi, D., Zago, L., Guglielmin, E., Pierno, M., Descroix, S., Viovy, J. L., & Mistura, G. (2018). Controlling the distance of highly confined droplets in a capillary by interfacial tension for merging on-demand. Lab On a Chip, 19(1), 136-146. https://doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01182f
Ferraro D, et al. Controlling the Distance of Highly Confined Droplets in a Capillary By Interfacial Tension for Merging On-demand. Lab Chip. 2018 12 18;19(1):136-146. PubMed PMID: 30484796.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Controlling the distance of highly confined droplets in a capillary by interfacial tension for merging on-demand. AU - Ferraro,D, AU - Serra,M, AU - Filippi,D, AU - Zago,L, AU - Guglielmin,E, AU - Pierno,M, AU - Descroix,S, AU - Viovy,J-L, AU - Mistura,G, PY - 2018/11/30/pubmed PY - 2019/5/7/medline PY - 2018/11/29/entrez SP - 136 EP - 146 JF - Lab on a chip JO - Lab Chip VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - Droplet microfluidics is a powerful technology that finds many applications in chemistry and biomedicine. Among different configurations, droplets confined in a capillary (or plugs) present a number of advantages: they allow positional identification and simplify the integration of complex multi-steps protocols. However, these protocols rely on the control of droplet speed, which is affected by a complex and still debated interplay of various physico-chemical parameters like droplet length, viscosity ratio between droplets and carrier fluid, flow rate and interfacial tension. We present here a systematic investigation of the droplet speed as a function of their length and interfacial tension, and propose a novel, simple and robust methodology to control the relative distance between consecutive droplets flowing in microfluidic channels through the addition of surfactants either into the dispersed and/or into the continuous phases. As a proof of concept application, we present the possibility to accurately trigger in space and time the merging of two confined droplets flowing in a uniform cross-section circular capillary. This approach is further validated by monitoring a conventional enzymatic reaction used to quantify the concentration of H2O2 in a biological sample, showing its potentialities in both continuous and stopped assay methods. SN - 1473-0189 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30484796/Controlling_the_distance_of_highly_confined_droplets_in_a_capillary_by_interfacial_tension_for_merging_on-demand L2 - https://doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01182f DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -