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Relationship Between Physical Activity, Tic Severity and Quality of Life in Children with Tourette Syndrome.

Abstract

Objective

To examine the relationship between physical activity, tic severity and quality of life (QoL) in children and adolescents with persistent tic disorder and Tourette Syndrome.

Method

Baseline data was examined from a larger randomized controlled trial (Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02153463). Physical activity was assessed via pedometers with daily step count recorded. Tic severity (assessed via Yale Global Tic Severity Scale or YGTSS) and QoL (assessed via PEDs QL 4.0) were compared between those more physically active (≥12,000 steps/day) and less physically active (<12,000 steps/day).

Results

Thirteen children participated; four had ≥12,000 steps/day and nine had <12,000 steps/day. The active group had a lower total tic severity (p = 0.02), and total YGTSS score (p=0.01). The vocal tic severity score was lower in the active group (p=0.02). Motor tic severity was not different amongst the two groups. For Peds QL scores, the active group performed better in physical functioning (p=0.01), social functioning (p=0.03), school functioning (p=0.02), psychosocial functioning (p=0.03) and total PEDs QL score (p=0.01).

Conclusions

Higher physical activity levels are associated with lower vocal tic severity and improved aspects of quality of life. Further research is needed to determine the utility of physical activity as therapy for tics.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario. Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario. Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario.Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario.Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario. Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario. Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario.Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario. Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario. Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario.Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario.Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario.Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario. Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30487937

Citation

Doja, Asif, et al. "Relationship Between Physical Activity, Tic Severity and Quality of Life in Children With Tourette Syndrome." Journal of the Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry = Journal De l'Academie Canadienne De Psychiatrie De L'enfant Et De L'adolescent, vol. 27, no. 4, 2018, pp. 222-227.
Doja A, Bookwala A, Pohl D, et al. Relationship Between Physical Activity, Tic Severity and Quality of Life in Children with Tourette Syndrome. J Can Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2018;27(4):222-227.
Doja, A., Bookwala, A., Pohl, D., Rossi-Ricci, A., Barrowman, N., Chan, J., & Longmuir, P. E. (2018). Relationship Between Physical Activity, Tic Severity and Quality of Life in Children with Tourette Syndrome. Journal of the Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry = Journal De l'Academie Canadienne De Psychiatrie De L'enfant Et De L'adolescent, 27(4), pp. 222-227.
Doja A, et al. Relationship Between Physical Activity, Tic Severity and Quality of Life in Children With Tourette Syndrome. J Can Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2018;27(4):222-227. PubMed PMID: 30487937.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship Between Physical Activity, Tic Severity and Quality of Life in Children with Tourette Syndrome. AU - Doja,Asif, AU - Bookwala,Ammar, AU - Pohl,Daniela, AU - Rossi-Ricci,Alessandra, AU - Barrowman,Nicholas, AU - Chan,Jason, AU - Longmuir,Patricia E, Y1 - 2018/11/01/ PY - 2017/08/02/received PY - 2018/07/08/accepted PY - 2018/11/30/entrez PY - 2018/11/30/pubmed PY - 2018/11/30/medline KW - Tourette Syndrome KW - physical activity KW - quality of life KW - tics SP - 222 EP - 227 JF - Journal of the Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry = Journal de l'Academie canadienne de psychiatrie de l'enfant et de l'adolescent JO - J Can Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry VL - 27 IS - 4 N2 - Objective: To examine the relationship between physical activity, tic severity and quality of life (QoL) in children and adolescents with persistent tic disorder and Tourette Syndrome. Method: Baseline data was examined from a larger randomized controlled trial (Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02153463). Physical activity was assessed via pedometers with daily step count recorded. Tic severity (assessed via Yale Global Tic Severity Scale or YGTSS) and QoL (assessed via PEDs QL 4.0) were compared between those more physically active (≥12,000 steps/day) and less physically active (<12,000 steps/day). Results: Thirteen children participated; four had ≥12,000 steps/day and nine had <12,000 steps/day. The active group had a lower total tic severity (p = 0.02), and total YGTSS score (p=0.01). The vocal tic severity score was lower in the active group (p=0.02). Motor tic severity was not different amongst the two groups. For Peds QL scores, the active group performed better in physical functioning (p=0.01), social functioning (p=0.03), school functioning (p=0.02), psychosocial functioning (p=0.03) and total PEDs QL score (p=0.01). Conclusions: Higher physical activity levels are associated with lower vocal tic severity and improved aspects of quality of life. Further research is needed to determine the utility of physical activity as therapy for tics. SN - 1719-8429 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30487937/full_citation L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/30487937/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -