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Patterns of congenitally missing teeth of non-syndromic and syndromic patients treated at a single-center over the past thirty years.
Arch Oral Biol. 2019 Feb; 98:140-147.AO

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Literature regarding congenitally-missing-teeth (CMT) is lacking especially on CMT-patterns. Thus, the aim of this study was to present an in-depth analysis of 843 patients with CMT treated at a single-center over the past thirty years.

DESIGN

Age, date-of-birth-year, gender, medical- and family-history, CMT-types, -numbers, -severity, -region, -symmetry, -patterns using the tooth agenesis code (TAC), and -growth types of all clinically and radiographically diagnosed CMT-patients were collected. Age and occurrence of syndromes were used to divide CMT-patients into non-syndromic patients older than nine years (group1) and syndromic CMT-patients (group2). Groups were compared especially regarding gender and CMT-severity.

RESULTS

The average CMT-number per patient was 5.5 (group1, n = 816, 59.9% female) and 15.1 (group2, n = 27, 29.6% female). There were significant less male (40.1% vs. 70.4%, respectively; P = 0.002) as well as significantly less male-oligodontia (44.8% vs. 73.9%, respectively; P = 0.009) in group1 than in group2. Group1 resulted in decreased prevalence of similar CMT-patterns with severity; the most prevalent CMT was the 2nd premolar; there were no significant differences between the right and left side, whereas more CMT affected the maxilla; the majority of patients presented with bilateral-CMT (82.8%); females were more affected by CMT but more males had severer forms; certain single CMT differed by gender, and CMT was related to first-grade-relatives.

CONCLUSION

The majority of CMT-patients presented with hypodontia. Furthermore, same CMT-patterns seem more like to be present in patients with milder forms of tooth agenesis. Gender-specific association regarding CMT-number, severity groups, and single CMT were detected.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Oral Surgery, University Clinic of Dentistry, Medical University of Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: simone.heuberer@meduniwien.ac.at.Division of Oral Surgery, University Clinic of Dentistry, Medical University of Vienna, Austria.Division of Oral Surgery, University Clinic of Dentistry, Medical University of Vienna, Austria.Austrian Research Group for Regenerative and Orthopedic Medicine Vienna, Austria.Division of Oral Surgery, University Clinic of Dentistry, Medical University of Vienna, Austria.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30496934

Citation

Heuberer, Simone, et al. "Patterns of Congenitally Missing Teeth of Non-syndromic and Syndromic Patients Treated at a Single-center Over the Past Thirty Years." Archives of Oral Biology, vol. 98, 2019, pp. 140-147.
Heuberer S, Ulm C, Zechner W, et al. Patterns of congenitally missing teeth of non-syndromic and syndromic patients treated at a single-center over the past thirty years. Arch Oral Biol. 2019;98:140-147.
Heuberer, S., Ulm, C., Zechner, W., Laky, B., & Watzak, G. (2019). Patterns of congenitally missing teeth of non-syndromic and syndromic patients treated at a single-center over the past thirty years. Archives of Oral Biology, 98, 140-147. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.archoralbio.2018.11.018
Heuberer S, et al. Patterns of Congenitally Missing Teeth of Non-syndromic and Syndromic Patients Treated at a Single-center Over the Past Thirty Years. Arch Oral Biol. 2019;98:140-147. PubMed PMID: 30496934.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Patterns of congenitally missing teeth of non-syndromic and syndromic patients treated at a single-center over the past thirty years. AU - Heuberer,Simone, AU - Ulm,Christian, AU - Zechner,Werner, AU - Laky,Brenda, AU - Watzak,Georg, Y1 - 2018/11/16/ PY - 2018/06/12/received PY - 2018/11/14/revised PY - 2018/11/15/accepted PY - 2018/11/30/pubmed PY - 2019/6/22/medline PY - 2018/11/30/entrez KW - Dental aplasia KW - Gender KW - Hypodontia KW - Oligodontia KW - Prevalence KW - Severity SP - 140 EP - 147 JF - Archives of oral biology JO - Arch. Oral Biol. VL - 98 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Literature regarding congenitally-missing-teeth (CMT) is lacking especially on CMT-patterns. Thus, the aim of this study was to present an in-depth analysis of 843 patients with CMT treated at a single-center over the past thirty years. DESIGN: Age, date-of-birth-year, gender, medical- and family-history, CMT-types, -numbers, -severity, -region, -symmetry, -patterns using the tooth agenesis code (TAC), and -growth types of all clinically and radiographically diagnosed CMT-patients were collected. Age and occurrence of syndromes were used to divide CMT-patients into non-syndromic patients older than nine years (group1) and syndromic CMT-patients (group2). Groups were compared especially regarding gender and CMT-severity. RESULTS: The average CMT-number per patient was 5.5 (group1, n = 816, 59.9% female) and 15.1 (group2, n = 27, 29.6% female). There were significant less male (40.1% vs. 70.4%, respectively; P = 0.002) as well as significantly less male-oligodontia (44.8% vs. 73.9%, respectively; P = 0.009) in group1 than in group2. Group1 resulted in decreased prevalence of similar CMT-patterns with severity; the most prevalent CMT was the 2nd premolar; there were no significant differences between the right and left side, whereas more CMT affected the maxilla; the majority of patients presented with bilateral-CMT (82.8%); females were more affected by CMT but more males had severer forms; certain single CMT differed by gender, and CMT was related to first-grade-relatives. CONCLUSION: The majority of CMT-patients presented with hypodontia. Furthermore, same CMT-patterns seem more like to be present in patients with milder forms of tooth agenesis. Gender-specific association regarding CMT-number, severity groups, and single CMT were detected. SN - 1879-1506 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30496934/Patterns_of_congenitally_missing_teeth_of_non_syndromic_and_syndromic_patients_treated_at_a_single_center_over_the_past_thirty_years_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0003-9969(18)30255-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -