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Diet-related inflammation and risk of prostate cancer in the California Men's Health Study.
Ann Epidemiol 2019; 29:30-38AE

Abstract

PURPOSE

The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between proinflammatory diet and prostate cancer risk.

METHODS

Energy-adjusted Dietary Inflammatory Index (E-DII) scores were computed among 40,161 participants in the California Men's Health Study. Over 9.7 ± 3.8 years of follow-up, 2707 incident prostate cancer cases were diagnosed and categorized as low-, intermediate-, or high-risk, based on disease grade and stage. Accelerated failure-time models assessed time to diagnosis of prostate cancer. Cox proportional hazard models estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Nonlinear effects of E-DII were modeled as third-order polynomials.

RESULTS

Time to prostate cancer diagnosis did not differ by E-DII quartile. The HR for high-risk prostate cancer increased in the third E-DII quartile (HRQ3 vs. Q1 = 1.36; 95% CI: 1.04-1.76), but not in the fourth (HRQ4 vs. Q1 = 0.99; 95% CI: 0.74-1.32, Ptrend = .74), suggesting a nonlinear dose-response. HR curves for prostate cancer increased exponentially above an E-DII threshold of ≈+3.0. HR curves for high-risk prostate cancer had a much steeper incline above an E-DII threshold of ≈+2.5. Curves were higher among Blacks and Whites relative to other races and among overweight or obese men. No relationship was observed between E-DII scores and intermediate- or low-risk disease.

CONCLUSIONS

Relationships between proinflammatory diet and prostate cancer risk may be nonlinear, with an increased risk above an E-DII threshold of ≈+2.5.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia; Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia; WJB Dorn Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Columbia, SC.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia; Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia; Connecting Health Innovations, LLC, Columbia, SC. Electronic address: jhebert@sc.edu.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia; Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia; Connecting Health Innovations, LLC, Columbia, SC.College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Arizona State University, Phoenix; Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia; Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia; Connecting Health Innovations, LLC, Columbia, SC.Department of Research and Evaluation, Kaiser Permanente Southern California, Pasadena.Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland.Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30503073

Citation

McMahon, Daria M., et al. "Diet-related Inflammation and Risk of Prostate Cancer in the California Men's Health Study." Annals of Epidemiology, vol. 29, 2019, pp. 30-38.
McMahon DM, Burch JB, Hébert JR, et al. Diet-related inflammation and risk of prostate cancer in the California Men's Health Study. Ann Epidemiol. 2019;29:30-38.
McMahon, D. M., Burch, J. B., Hébert, J. R., Hardin, J. W., Zhang, J., Wirth, M. D., ... Van Den Eeden, S. K. (2019). Diet-related inflammation and risk of prostate cancer in the California Men's Health Study. Annals of Epidemiology, 29, pp. 30-38. doi:10.1016/j.annepidem.2018.10.008.
McMahon DM, et al. Diet-related Inflammation and Risk of Prostate Cancer in the California Men's Health Study. Ann Epidemiol. 2019;29:30-38. PubMed PMID: 30503073.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diet-related inflammation and risk of prostate cancer in the California Men's Health Study. AU - McMahon,Daria M, AU - Burch,James B, AU - Hébert,James R, AU - Hardin,James W, AU - Zhang,Jiajia, AU - Wirth,Michael D, AU - Youngstedt,Shawn D, AU - Shivappa,Nitin, AU - Jacobsen,Steven J, AU - Caan,Bette, AU - Van Den Eeden,Stephen K, Y1 - 2018/11/02/ PY - 2018/06/08/received PY - 2018/10/22/revised PY - 2018/10/26/accepted PY - 2020/01/01/pmc-release PY - 2018/12/7/pubmed PY - 2019/10/23/medline PY - 2018/12/4/entrez KW - Cohort studies KW - Continental population groups KW - Diet KW - Dietary inflammatory index KW - Epidemiology KW - Inflammation KW - Prospective studies KW - Prostatic neoplasms SP - 30 EP - 38 JF - Annals of epidemiology JO - Ann Epidemiol VL - 29 N2 - PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between proinflammatory diet and prostate cancer risk. METHODS: Energy-adjusted Dietary Inflammatory Index (E-DII) scores were computed among 40,161 participants in the California Men's Health Study. Over 9.7 ± 3.8 years of follow-up, 2707 incident prostate cancer cases were diagnosed and categorized as low-, intermediate-, or high-risk, based on disease grade and stage. Accelerated failure-time models assessed time to diagnosis of prostate cancer. Cox proportional hazard models estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Nonlinear effects of E-DII were modeled as third-order polynomials. RESULTS: Time to prostate cancer diagnosis did not differ by E-DII quartile. The HR for high-risk prostate cancer increased in the third E-DII quartile (HRQ3 vs. Q1 = 1.36; 95% CI: 1.04-1.76), but not in the fourth (HRQ4 vs. Q1 = 0.99; 95% CI: 0.74-1.32, Ptrend = .74), suggesting a nonlinear dose-response. HR curves for prostate cancer increased exponentially above an E-DII threshold of ≈+3.0. HR curves for high-risk prostate cancer had a much steeper incline above an E-DII threshold of ≈+2.5. Curves were higher among Blacks and Whites relative to other races and among overweight or obese men. No relationship was observed between E-DII scores and intermediate- or low-risk disease. CONCLUSIONS: Relationships between proinflammatory diet and prostate cancer risk may be nonlinear, with an increased risk above an E-DII threshold of ≈+2.5. SN - 1873-2585 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30503073/Diet_related_inflammation_and_risk_of_prostate_cancer_in_the_California_Men's_Health_Study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1047-2797(18)30527-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -