Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

How do energy balance-related behaviors cluster in adolescents?
Int J Public Health. 2019 Mar; 64(2):195-208.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To delineate the clustering of energy balance-related behaviors in adolescents and investigate whether these behaviors are associated with the household socioeconomic status and parental education level.

METHODS

Two cross-sectional studies assessed information on sedentary behavior, physical activity, sugar-sweetened beverages and fruit and vegetable consumption, and sleep duration by self-reported questionnaires in adolescents (12.5-17.5 years old) from Maringá/Brazil (BRACAH Study; n = 682) and ten European cities (HELENA Study; n = 1252) from nine different countries. Gender-specific cluster analyses were performed separately for each study, applying a combination of hierarchical and non-hierarchical methods.

RESULTS

Girls showed equivalent behaviors: Sedentary; Active; Unhealthy Eating; Healthy Eating; while boys differed (Brazilian: Sedentary; Active; Healthy Eating; European: Sedentary; Healthy; Unhealthy Eating). In Brazil, we found no association between socioeconomic status and parental education. In European girls, the high socioeconomic status and both parents' university degree were associated with Healthy Eating. In European boys, the high socioeconomic status was associated with Unhealthy Eating, and the mothers' university degree was associated with the Healthy cluster.

CONCLUSIONS

Adolescents show Sedentary behavior, regardless of their sex, country of origin, or socioeconomic condition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

YCARE (Youth/Child cArdiovascular Risk and Environmental) Research Group, School of Medicine, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil. tcollese@usp.br. Departamento de Medicina Preventiva/Pós-Graduação, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Dr. Arnaldo, 455 - 2º andar - sala 2162, São Paulo, SP, Cep.01246-903, Brazil. tcollese@usp.br.YCARE (Youth/Child cArdiovascular Risk and Environmental) Research Group, School of Medicine, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Saragossa, Spain. Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Saragossa, Spain. Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Madrid, Spain. Red de Salud Materno-infantil y del Desarrollo (SAMID), Madrid, Spain. Fundación Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Health Science and Education, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Health Science and Education, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Unit, University of Crete School of Medicine, Heraklion, Crete, Greece.Academic Institute for Clinical Nutrition, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.Council for Agricultural Research and Economics-Research Center on Food and Nutrition (CREA-NUT), Rome, Italy.Univ. Lille, CHU Lille, LIRIC UMR 995 Inserm, Clinical Investigation Center, CIC- 1403-Inserm-CHU, Lille, 59000, France.Department of Biosciences and Nutrition (BioNut), Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.Polytechnic University of Madrid, Health and Human Performance, Madrid, Spain.YCARE (Youth/Child cArdiovascular Risk and Environmental) Research Group, School of Medicine, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Saragossa, Spain. Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Saragossa, Spain. Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Madrid, Spain. Red de Salud Materno-infantil y del Desarrollo (SAMID), Madrid, Spain. Departamento de Medicina Preventiva/Pós-Graduação, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Dr. Arnaldo, 455 - 2º andar - sala 2162, São Paulo, SP, Cep.01246-903, Brazil.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30511170

Citation

Collese, Tatiana Sadalla, et al. "How Do Energy Balance-related Behaviors Cluster in Adolescents?" International Journal of Public Health, vol. 64, no. 2, 2019, pp. 195-208.
Collese TS, De Moraes ACF, Fernández-Alvira JM, et al. How do energy balance-related behaviors cluster in adolescents? Int J Public Health. 2019;64(2):195-208.
Collese, T. S., De Moraes, A. C. F., Fernández-Alvira, J. M., Michels, N., De Henauw, S., Manios, Y., Androutsos, O., Kafatos, A., Widhalm, K., Galfo, M., Beghin, L., Sjöström, M., Pedrero-Chamizo, R., Carvalho, H. B., & Moreno, L. A. (2019). How do energy balance-related behaviors cluster in adolescents? International Journal of Public Health, 64(2), 195-208. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00038-018-1178-3
Collese TS, et al. How Do Energy Balance-related Behaviors Cluster in Adolescents. Int J Public Health. 2019;64(2):195-208. PubMed PMID: 30511170.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - How do energy balance-related behaviors cluster in adolescents? AU - Collese,Tatiana Sadalla, AU - De Moraes,Augusto César Ferreira, AU - Fernández-Alvira,Juan Miguel, AU - Michels,Nathalie, AU - De Henauw,Stefaan, AU - Manios,Yannis, AU - Androutsos,Odysseas, AU - Kafatos,Anthony, AU - Widhalm,Kurt, AU - Galfo,Myriam, AU - Beghin,Laurent, AU - Sjöström,Michael, AU - Pedrero-Chamizo,Raquel, AU - Carvalho,Heráclito Barbosa, AU - Moreno,Luis A, AU - ,, Y1 - 2018/12/04/ PY - 2018/01/15/received PY - 2018/11/22/accepted PY - 2018/10/31/revised PY - 2018/12/5/pubmed PY - 2019/5/29/medline PY - 2018/12/5/entrez KW - Adolescents KW - Cluster analysis KW - Energy balance-related behaviors KW - Parental education KW - Socioeconomic status SP - 195 EP - 208 JF - International journal of public health JO - Int J Public Health VL - 64 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To delineate the clustering of energy balance-related behaviors in adolescents and investigate whether these behaviors are associated with the household socioeconomic status and parental education level. METHODS: Two cross-sectional studies assessed information on sedentary behavior, physical activity, sugar-sweetened beverages and fruit and vegetable consumption, and sleep duration by self-reported questionnaires in adolescents (12.5-17.5 years old) from Maringá/Brazil (BRACAH Study; n = 682) and ten European cities (HELENA Study; n = 1252) from nine different countries. Gender-specific cluster analyses were performed separately for each study, applying a combination of hierarchical and non-hierarchical methods. RESULTS: Girls showed equivalent behaviors: Sedentary; Active; Unhealthy Eating; Healthy Eating; while boys differed (Brazilian: Sedentary; Active; Healthy Eating; European: Sedentary; Healthy; Unhealthy Eating). In Brazil, we found no association between socioeconomic status and parental education. In European girls, the high socioeconomic status and both parents' university degree were associated with Healthy Eating. In European boys, the high socioeconomic status was associated with Unhealthy Eating, and the mothers' university degree was associated with the Healthy cluster. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents show Sedentary behavior, regardless of their sex, country of origin, or socioeconomic condition. SN - 1661-8564 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30511170/How_do_energy_balance-related_behaviors_cluster_in_adolescents L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00038-018-1178-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -