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Rationale for novel intermittent dieting strategies to attenuate adaptive responses to energy restriction.
Obes Rev. 2018 12; 19 Suppl 1:47-60.OR

Abstract

Eating patterns involving intermittent energy restriction (IER) include 'intermittent fasting' where energy intake is severely restricted for several 'fasting' days per week, with 'refeeding' days (involving greater energy intake than during fasting days) at other times. Intermittent fasting does not improve weight loss compared to continuous energy restriction (CER), where energy intake is restricted every day. We hypothesize that weight loss from IER could be improved if refeeding phases involved restoration of energy balance (i.e. not ongoing energy restriction, as during intermittent fasting). There is some evidence in adults with overweight or obesity showing that maintenance of a lower weight may attenuate (completely or partially) some of the adaptive responses to energy restriction that oppose ongoing weight loss. Other studies show some adaptive responses persist unabated for years after weight loss. Only five randomized controlled trials in adults with overweight or obesity have compared CER with IER interventions that achieved energy balance (or absence of energy restriction) during refeeding phases. Two reported greater weight loss than CER, whereas three reported similar weight loss between interventions. While inconclusive, it is possible that achieving energy balance (i.e. avoiding energy restriction or energy excess) during refeeding phases may be important in realizing the potential of IER.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Medicine and Health, Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, The Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders, NSW, Australia.School of Health Sciences, College of Health and Medicine, University of Tasmania, Launceston, TAS, Australia.Faculty of Medicine and Health, Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, The Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders, NSW, Australia.School of Health Sciences, College of Health and Medicine, University of Tasmania, Launceston, TAS, Australia.School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences and Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.Faculty of Medicine and Health, Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, The Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders, NSW, Australia.School of Health Sciences, College of Health and Medicine, University of Tasmania, Launceston, TAS, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30511512

Citation

Sainsbury, A, et al. "Rationale for Novel Intermittent Dieting Strategies to Attenuate Adaptive Responses to Energy Restriction." Obesity Reviews : an Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, vol. 19 Suppl 1, 2018, pp. 47-60.
Sainsbury A, Wood RE, Seimon RV, et al. Rationale for novel intermittent dieting strategies to attenuate adaptive responses to energy restriction. Obes Rev. 2018;19 Suppl 1:47-60.
Sainsbury, A., Wood, R. E., Seimon, R. V., Hills, A. P., King, N. A., Gibson, A. A., & Byrne, N. M. (2018). Rationale for novel intermittent dieting strategies to attenuate adaptive responses to energy restriction. Obesity Reviews : an Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, 19 Suppl 1, 47-60. https://doi.org/10.1111/obr.12787
Sainsbury A, et al. Rationale for Novel Intermittent Dieting Strategies to Attenuate Adaptive Responses to Energy Restriction. Obes Rev. 2018;19 Suppl 1:47-60. PubMed PMID: 30511512.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Rationale for novel intermittent dieting strategies to attenuate adaptive responses to energy restriction. AU - Sainsbury,A, AU - Wood,R E, AU - Seimon,R V, AU - Hills,A P, AU - King,N A, AU - Gibson,A A, AU - Byrne,N M, PY - 2018/09/07/received PY - 2018/09/11/accepted PY - 2018/12/5/entrez PY - 2018/12/5/pubmed PY - 2019/4/12/medline KW - Diet-reducing KW - intermittent energy restriction KW - intermittent fasting KW - obesity SP - 47 EP - 60 JF - Obesity reviews : an official journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity JO - Obes Rev VL - 19 Suppl 1 N2 - Eating patterns involving intermittent energy restriction (IER) include 'intermittent fasting' where energy intake is severely restricted for several 'fasting' days per week, with 'refeeding' days (involving greater energy intake than during fasting days) at other times. Intermittent fasting does not improve weight loss compared to continuous energy restriction (CER), where energy intake is restricted every day. We hypothesize that weight loss from IER could be improved if refeeding phases involved restoration of energy balance (i.e. not ongoing energy restriction, as during intermittent fasting). There is some evidence in adults with overweight or obesity showing that maintenance of a lower weight may attenuate (completely or partially) some of the adaptive responses to energy restriction that oppose ongoing weight loss. Other studies show some adaptive responses persist unabated for years after weight loss. Only five randomized controlled trials in adults with overweight or obesity have compared CER with IER interventions that achieved energy balance (or absence of energy restriction) during refeeding phases. Two reported greater weight loss than CER, whereas three reported similar weight loss between interventions. While inconclusive, it is possible that achieving energy balance (i.e. avoiding energy restriction or energy excess) during refeeding phases may be important in realizing the potential of IER. SN - 1467-789X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30511512/Rationale_for_novel_intermittent_dieting_strategies_to_attenuate_adaptive_responses_to_energy_restriction_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/obr.12787 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -