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Effects of intermittent versus continuous energy restriction for weight loss on diet quality and eating behavior. A randomized trial.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2019 07; 73(7):1006-1014.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES

Weight loss diets affect food choices and control of eating. We evaluated the effects of intermittent energy restriction (IER) vs. continuous energy restriction (CER) on nutritional composition and eating behavior.

SUBJECT/METHODS

Individuals with BMI 30-45 kg/m2, abdominal obesity and ≥1 additional metabolic syndrome component were randomized to IER vs. CER with similar energy restriction. Of 112 participants, 98 completed weighed dietary records and the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire at baseline and three months. In statistical analysis, changes were adjusted for baseline values.

RESULTS

Weight loss, energy intake, and macronutrient composition were similar in the IER and CER groups. The CER group reported a greater increase in fruit and berries (45 g/day [95% CI 21, 71] vs. 2 g/day [-28, 33]; p = 0.047) and vegetables (135 g/day [91, 179] vs. 65 g/day [35, 96]; p = 0.010) than the IER group. Fiber intake increased in the CER compared to the IER group (1.0 g/MJ/day [0.8, 1.2] vs. 0.2 [0.0, 0.4]; p < 0.001). Sugar intake was reduced in the CER compared to the IER group (-2.2E% [-3.2, -2.2] vs. -0.1E% [-1.2, 1.0]; p = 0.007). Intakes of folate, potassium, and magnesium decreased more in the IER than the CER group, while vitamin C increased more in the CER group (all p-values <0.014). Both diets improved eating behavior scores, but cognitive restraint increased more in the CER than the IER group (34 [30, 39] vs. 17 [12, 22]; p = 0.013).

CONCLUSIONS

Men and women with obesity had more favorable changes in nutritional composition and eating behavior with CER than IER.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section for Preventive Cardiology, Department of Endocrinology, Morbid Obesity and Preventive Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. tinsun@ous-hf.no.Section for Preventive Cardiology, Department of Endocrinology, Morbid Obesity and Preventive Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.Section for Preventive Cardiology, Department of Endocrinology, Morbid Obesity and Preventive Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30514879

Citation

Sundfør, T M., et al. "Effects of Intermittent Versus Continuous Energy Restriction for Weight Loss On Diet Quality and Eating Behavior. a Randomized Trial." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 73, no. 7, 2019, pp. 1006-1014.
Sundfør TM, Tonstad S, Svendsen M. Effects of intermittent versus continuous energy restriction for weight loss on diet quality and eating behavior. A randomized trial. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2019;73(7):1006-1014.
Sundfør, T. M., Tonstad, S., & Svendsen, M. (2019). Effects of intermittent versus continuous energy restriction for weight loss on diet quality and eating behavior. A randomized trial. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 73(7), 1006-1014. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41430-018-0370-0
Sundfør TM, Tonstad S, Svendsen M. Effects of Intermittent Versus Continuous Energy Restriction for Weight Loss On Diet Quality and Eating Behavior. a Randomized Trial. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2019;73(7):1006-1014. PubMed PMID: 30514879.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of intermittent versus continuous energy restriction for weight loss on diet quality and eating behavior. A randomized trial. AU - Sundfør,T M, AU - Tonstad,S, AU - Svendsen,M, Y1 - 2018/12/04/ PY - 2018/05/29/received PY - 2018/11/20/accepted PY - 2018/11/15/revised PY - 2018/12/6/pubmed PY - 2020/8/28/medline PY - 2018/12/6/entrez SP - 1006 EP - 1014 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 73 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Weight loss diets affect food choices and control of eating. We evaluated the effects of intermittent energy restriction (IER) vs. continuous energy restriction (CER) on nutritional composition and eating behavior. SUBJECT/METHODS: Individuals with BMI 30-45 kg/m2, abdominal obesity and ≥1 additional metabolic syndrome component were randomized to IER vs. CER with similar energy restriction. Of 112 participants, 98 completed weighed dietary records and the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire at baseline and three months. In statistical analysis, changes were adjusted for baseline values. RESULTS: Weight loss, energy intake, and macronutrient composition were similar in the IER and CER groups. The CER group reported a greater increase in fruit and berries (45 g/day [95% CI 21, 71] vs. 2 g/day [-28, 33]; p = 0.047) and vegetables (135 g/day [91, 179] vs. 65 g/day [35, 96]; p = 0.010) than the IER group. Fiber intake increased in the CER compared to the IER group (1.0 g/MJ/day [0.8, 1.2] vs. 0.2 [0.0, 0.4]; p < 0.001). Sugar intake was reduced in the CER compared to the IER group (-2.2E% [-3.2, -2.2] vs. -0.1E% [-1.2, 1.0]; p = 0.007). Intakes of folate, potassium, and magnesium decreased more in the IER than the CER group, while vitamin C increased more in the CER group (all p-values <0.014). Both diets improved eating behavior scores, but cognitive restraint increased more in the CER than the IER group (34 [30, 39] vs. 17 [12, 22]; p = 0.013). CONCLUSIONS: Men and women with obesity had more favorable changes in nutritional composition and eating behavior with CER than IER. SN - 1476-5640 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30514879/Effects_of_intermittent_versus_continuous_energy_restriction_for_weight_loss_on_diet_quality_and_eating_behavior__A_randomized_trial_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/s41430-018-0370-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -