Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Prepregnancy Depression and Breastfeeding Duration: A Look at Maternal Age.
J Pregnancy 2018; 2018:4825727JP

Abstract

Background

In the United States, major depressive disorder affects one in five women aged 20-40 years. During these childbearing years, depression can negatively impact maternal behaviors that are crucial for infant growth and development. This study examined the relationship between prepregnancy depression and breastfeeding duration by maternal age.

Methods

Data from Phase 7 (2012-2013) of the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (N=62,483) were analyzed. Prepregnancy depression was dichotomized while breastfeeding duration was categorized as never breastfed, breastfed 8 weeks or less, and breastfed more than 8 weeks. Maternal age was a significant effect modifier; therefore, results were stratified by maternal age. Multinomial logistic regression was used to obtain odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI).

Results

For women aged 20-24, 25-29, and 30-34 years with prepregnancy depression, the odds of never breastfeeding and breastfeeding 8 weeks or less were significantly higher than in women with no history of prepregnancy depression. Notably, among women aged 25-29 with prepregnancy depression, the odds of never breastfeeding and breastfeeding 8 weeks or less were 93% (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.93, 95% CI =1.57-2.37) and 65% (AOR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.37-1.99) higher compared to women with no history of prepregnancy depression, respectively.

Conclusions

Having a history of poor mental health before pregnancy may increase the likelihood of premature breastfeeding cessation. A woman's mental health status before pregnancy should be considered in reproductive and prenatal care models. Efforts should be made to understand challenges women of specific age groups face when trying to breastfeed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Virginia Commonwealth University, School of Medicine, Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, 830 East Main Street, Suite 821, P.O. Box 980212, Richmond, VA 23298-0212, USA.Virginia Commonwealth University, School of Medicine, Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, 830 East Main Street, Suite 821, P.O. Box 980212, Richmond, VA 23298-0212, USA.Virginia Commonwealth University, School of Medicine, Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, 830 East Main Street, Suite 821, P.O. Box 980212, Richmond, VA 23298-0212, USA.Virginia Commonwealth University, School of Medicine, Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, 830 East Main Street, Suite 821, P.O. Box 980212, Richmond, VA 23298-0212, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30515328

Citation

Wallenborn, Jordyn T., et al. "Prepregnancy Depression and Breastfeeding Duration: a Look at Maternal Age." Journal of Pregnancy, vol. 2018, 2018, p. 4825727.
Wallenborn JT, Joseph AC, Graves WC, et al. Prepregnancy Depression and Breastfeeding Duration: A Look at Maternal Age. J Pregnancy. 2018;2018:4825727.
Wallenborn, J. T., Joseph, A. C., Graves, W. C., & Masho, S. W. (2018). Prepregnancy Depression and Breastfeeding Duration: A Look at Maternal Age. Journal of Pregnancy, 2018, p. 4825727. doi:10.1155/2018/4825727.
Wallenborn JT, et al. Prepregnancy Depression and Breastfeeding Duration: a Look at Maternal Age. J Pregnancy. 2018;2018:4825727. PubMed PMID: 30515328.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prepregnancy Depression and Breastfeeding Duration: A Look at Maternal Age. AU - Wallenborn,Jordyn T, AU - Joseph,Anny-Claude, AU - Graves,Whitney C, AU - Masho,Saba W, Y1 - 2018/11/01/ PY - 2018/05/08/received PY - 2018/09/25/revised PY - 2018/10/16/accepted PY - 2018/12/6/entrez PY - 2018/12/6/pubmed PY - 2019/4/5/medline SP - 4825727 EP - 4825727 JF - Journal of pregnancy JO - J Pregnancy VL - 2018 N2 - Background: In the United States, major depressive disorder affects one in five women aged 20-40 years. During these childbearing years, depression can negatively impact maternal behaviors that are crucial for infant growth and development. This study examined the relationship between prepregnancy depression and breastfeeding duration by maternal age. Methods: Data from Phase 7 (2012-2013) of the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (N=62,483) were analyzed. Prepregnancy depression was dichotomized while breastfeeding duration was categorized as never breastfed, breastfed 8 weeks or less, and breastfed more than 8 weeks. Maternal age was a significant effect modifier; therefore, results were stratified by maternal age. Multinomial logistic regression was used to obtain odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: For women aged 20-24, 25-29, and 30-34 years with prepregnancy depression, the odds of never breastfeeding and breastfeeding 8 weeks or less were significantly higher than in women with no history of prepregnancy depression. Notably, among women aged 25-29 with prepregnancy depression, the odds of never breastfeeding and breastfeeding 8 weeks or less were 93% (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.93, 95% CI =1.57-2.37) and 65% (AOR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.37-1.99) higher compared to women with no history of prepregnancy depression, respectively. Conclusions: Having a history of poor mental health before pregnancy may increase the likelihood of premature breastfeeding cessation. A woman's mental health status before pregnancy should be considered in reproductive and prenatal care models. Efforts should be made to understand challenges women of specific age groups face when trying to breastfeed. SN - 2090-2735 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30515328/Prepregnancy_Depression_and_Breastfeeding_Duration:_A_Look_at_Maternal_Age_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/4825727 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -