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Differences in Functional Connectivity of the Insula Between Brain Wave Vibration in Meditators and Non-meditators.
Mindfulness (N Y). 2018; 9(6):1857-1866.M

Abstract

The majority of meditation involves focusing attention on internal events or sensations and becoming aware of emotions. The insula cortex, through a functional connection with the prefrontal cortex and other brain regions, plays a key role in integrating external sensory information with internal bodily state signals and emotional awareness. The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine the resting-state functional connectivity of the insula with other brain regions in meditation practitioners and control subjects. Thirty-five Brain Wave Vibration meditation practitioners and 33 controls without meditation experience were included in this study. All subjects underwent 4.68-min resting-state functional scanning runs using magnetic resonance imaging. The anterior and posterior insulae were chosen as seed regions for the functional connectivity map. Meditation practitioners showed significantly greater insula-related functional connectivity in the thalamus, caudate, middle frontal gyrus, and superior temporal gyrus than did controls. Control subjects demonstrated greater functional connectivity with the posterior insula in the parahippocampal gyrus. Our findings suggest that the practice of Brain Wave Vibration meditation may be associated with functional differences in regions related to focused attention, executive control, and emotional awareness and regulation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Department of Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. 2Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea.3Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.4Yeongeon Student Support Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.2Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. 5Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 03080 Republic of Korea.6Korea Institute of Brain Science, Seoul, Republic of Korea.2Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. 5Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 03080 Republic of Korea.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30524515

Citation

Jang, Joon Hwan, et al. "Differences in Functional Connectivity of the Insula Between Brain Wave Vibration in Meditators and Non-meditators." Mindfulness, vol. 9, no. 6, 2018, pp. 1857-1866.
Jang JH, Kim JH, Yun JY, et al. Differences in Functional Connectivity of the Insula Between Brain Wave Vibration in Meditators and Non-meditators. Mindfulness (N Y). 2018;9(6):1857-1866.
Jang, J. H., Kim, J. H., Yun, J. Y., Choi, S. H., An, S. C., & Kang, D. H. (2018). Differences in Functional Connectivity of the Insula Between Brain Wave Vibration in Meditators and Non-meditators. Mindfulness, 9(6), 1857-1866. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-018-0928-x
Jang JH, et al. Differences in Functional Connectivity of the Insula Between Brain Wave Vibration in Meditators and Non-meditators. Mindfulness (N Y). 2018;9(6):1857-1866. PubMed PMID: 30524515.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Differences in Functional Connectivity of the Insula Between Brain Wave Vibration in Meditators and Non-meditators. AU - Jang,Joon Hwan, AU - Kim,Jae-Hun, AU - Yun,Je-Yeon, AU - Choi,Soo-Hee, AU - An,Seung Chan, AU - Kang,Do-Hyung, Y1 - 2018/03/19/ PY - 2018/12/8/entrez PY - 2018/12/14/pubmed PY - 2018/12/14/medline KW - Functional magnetic resonance imaging KW - Insula KW - Meditation KW - Resting-state functional connectivity SP - 1857 EP - 1866 JF - Mindfulness JO - Mindfulness (N Y) VL - 9 IS - 6 N2 - The majority of meditation involves focusing attention on internal events or sensations and becoming aware of emotions. The insula cortex, through a functional connection with the prefrontal cortex and other brain regions, plays a key role in integrating external sensory information with internal bodily state signals and emotional awareness. The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine the resting-state functional connectivity of the insula with other brain regions in meditation practitioners and control subjects. Thirty-five Brain Wave Vibration meditation practitioners and 33 controls without meditation experience were included in this study. All subjects underwent 4.68-min resting-state functional scanning runs using magnetic resonance imaging. The anterior and posterior insulae were chosen as seed regions for the functional connectivity map. Meditation practitioners showed significantly greater insula-related functional connectivity in the thalamus, caudate, middle frontal gyrus, and superior temporal gyrus than did controls. Control subjects demonstrated greater functional connectivity with the posterior insula in the parahippocampal gyrus. Our findings suggest that the practice of Brain Wave Vibration meditation may be associated with functional differences in regions related to focused attention, executive control, and emotional awareness and regulation. SN - 1868-8527 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30524515/Differences_in_Functional_Connectivity_of_the_Insula_Between_Brain_Wave_Vibration_in_Meditators_and_Non_meditators_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/30524515/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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