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Magnetic resonance imaging muscle lesions in presumptive canine fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy.
Can Vet J. 2018 12; 59(12):1287-1292.CV

Abstract

This retrospective cohort study reports the observation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) epaxial muscle hyperintensity in dogs diagnosed with presumptive fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy (FCEM) (n = 61). It further reports the observation of vertebral column hyperesthesia lasting > 12 hours. The hypothesis tested was that the finding of MRI epaxial muscle hyperintensity correlated with dogs presenting with hyperesthesia. Client-owned dogs diagnosed with presumptive FCEM by specific MRI criteria were included. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact test. Twenty-three percent (14/61) of MRIs displayed abnormal muscle hyperintensity and 43% (26/61) exhibited vertebral column hyperesthesia. No relationship was found between muscle hyperintensity and pain persisting beyond 12 hours. The muscle hyperintensity remains of unknown significance. That 43% of presumptive FCEM cases have prolonged signs of pain is a higher prevalence than previously reported, and may affect clinical differential diagnoses. This is especially significant in cases in which MRI is not possible and a presumptive diagnosis must be based on the clinical signs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1.Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1.Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30532285

Citation

Martens, Sabrina M., et al. "Magnetic Resonance Imaging Muscle Lesions in Presumptive Canine Fibrocartilaginous Embolic Myelopathy." The Canadian Veterinary Journal = La Revue Veterinaire Canadienne, vol. 59, no. 12, 2018, pp. 1287-1292.
Martens SM, Nykamp SG, James FMK. Magnetic resonance imaging muscle lesions in presumptive canine fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy. Can Vet J. 2018;59(12):1287-1292.
Martens, S. M., Nykamp, S. G., & James, F. M. K. (2018). Magnetic resonance imaging muscle lesions in presumptive canine fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy. The Canadian Veterinary Journal = La Revue Veterinaire Canadienne, 59(12), 1287-1292.
Martens SM, Nykamp SG, James FMK. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Muscle Lesions in Presumptive Canine Fibrocartilaginous Embolic Myelopathy. Can Vet J. 2018;59(12):1287-1292. PubMed PMID: 30532285.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Magnetic resonance imaging muscle lesions in presumptive canine fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy. AU - Martens,Sabrina M, AU - Nykamp,Stephanie G, AU - James,Fiona M K, PY - 2018/12/12/entrez PY - 2018/12/12/pubmed PY - 2019/10/9/medline SP - 1287 EP - 1292 JF - The Canadian veterinary journal = La revue veterinaire canadienne JO - Can Vet J VL - 59 IS - 12 N2 - This retrospective cohort study reports the observation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) epaxial muscle hyperintensity in dogs diagnosed with presumptive fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy (FCEM) (n = 61). It further reports the observation of vertebral column hyperesthesia lasting > 12 hours. The hypothesis tested was that the finding of MRI epaxial muscle hyperintensity correlated with dogs presenting with hyperesthesia. Client-owned dogs diagnosed with presumptive FCEM by specific MRI criteria were included. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact test. Twenty-three percent (14/61) of MRIs displayed abnormal muscle hyperintensity and 43% (26/61) exhibited vertebral column hyperesthesia. No relationship was found between muscle hyperintensity and pain persisting beyond 12 hours. The muscle hyperintensity remains of unknown significance. That 43% of presumptive FCEM cases have prolonged signs of pain is a higher prevalence than previously reported, and may affect clinical differential diagnoses. This is especially significant in cases in which MRI is not possible and a presumptive diagnosis must be based on the clinical signs. SN - 0008-5286 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30532285/Magnetic_resonance_imaging_muscle_lesions_in_presumptive_canine_fibrocartilaginous_embolic_myelopathy_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/30532285/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -