Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Body, Brain, Life for Cognitive Decline (BBL-CD): protocol for a multidomain dementia risk reduction randomized controlled trial for subjective cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment.
Clin Interv Aging 2018; 13:2397-2406CI

Abstract

Background

With no cure for dementia and the number of people living with the condition predicted to rapidly rise, there is an urgent need for dementia risk reduction and prevention interventions. Modifiable lifestyle risk factors have been identified as playing a major role in the development of dementia; hence, interventions addressing these risk factors represent a significant opportunity to reduce the number of people developing dementia. Relatively few interventions have been trialed in older participants with cognitive decline (secondary prevention).

Objectives

This study evaluates the efficacy and feasibility of a multidomain lifestyle risk reduction intervention for people with subjective cognitive decline (SCD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

Methods

This study is an 8-week, two-arm, single-blind, randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a lifestyle modification program to reduce dementia risk. The active control group receives the following four online educational modules: dementia literacy and lifestyle risk, Mediterranean diet (MeDi), cognitive engagement and physical activity. The intervention group also completes the same educational modules but receives additional practical components including sessions with a dietitian, online brain training and sessions with an exercise physiologist to assist with lifestyle modification.

Results

Primary outcome measures are cognition (The Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive-Plus [ADAS-Cog-Plus]) and a composite lifestyle risk factor score for Alzheimer's disease (Australian National University - Alzheimer's Disease Risk Index [ANU-ADRI]). Secondary outcome measures are motivation to change lifestyle (Motivation to Change Lifestyle and Health Behaviour for Dementia Risk Reduction [MCLHB-DRR]) and health-related quality of life (36-item Short Form Health Survey [SF-36]). Feasibility will be determined through adherence to diet (Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener [MEDAS] and Australian Recommended Food Score [ARFS]), cognitive engagement (BrainHQ-derived statistics) and physical activity interventions (physical activity calendars). Outcomes are measured at baseline, immediately post-intervention and at 3- and 6-month follow-up by researchers blind to group allocation.

Discussion

If successful and feasible, secondary prevention lifestyle interventions could provide a targeted, cost-effective way to reduce the number of people with cognitive decline going on to develop Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing, Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia, mitchell.mcmaster@anu.edu.au.Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing, Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia, mitchell.mcmaster@anu.edu.au.Centre for Research in Ageing and Cognitive Health, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK.Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia.National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia.Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing, Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia, mitchell.mcmaster@anu.edu.au. Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia. School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30538436

Citation

McMaster, Mitchell, et al. "Body, Brain, Life for Cognitive Decline (BBL-CD): Protocol for a Multidomain Dementia Risk Reduction Randomized Controlled Trial for Subjective Cognitive Decline and Mild Cognitive Impairment." Clinical Interventions in Aging, vol. 13, 2018, pp. 2397-2406.
McMaster M, Kim S, Clare L, et al. Body, Brain, Life for Cognitive Decline (BBL-CD): protocol for a multidomain dementia risk reduction randomized controlled trial for subjective cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment. Clin Interv Aging. 2018;13:2397-2406.
McMaster, M., Kim, S., Clare, L., Torres, S. J., D'Este, C., & Anstey, K. J. (2018). Body, Brain, Life for Cognitive Decline (BBL-CD): protocol for a multidomain dementia risk reduction randomized controlled trial for subjective cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment. Clinical Interventions in Aging, 13, pp. 2397-2406. doi:10.2147/CIA.S182046.
McMaster M, et al. Body, Brain, Life for Cognitive Decline (BBL-CD): Protocol for a Multidomain Dementia Risk Reduction Randomized Controlled Trial for Subjective Cognitive Decline and Mild Cognitive Impairment. Clin Interv Aging. 2018;13:2397-2406. PubMed PMID: 30538436.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body, Brain, Life for Cognitive Decline (BBL-CD): protocol for a multidomain dementia risk reduction randomized controlled trial for subjective cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment. AU - McMaster,Mitchell, AU - Kim,Sarang, AU - Clare,Linda, AU - Torres,Susan J, AU - D'Este,Catherine, AU - Anstey,Kaarin J, Y1 - 2018/11/21/ PY - 2018/12/13/entrez PY - 2018/12/13/pubmed PY - 2018/12/13/medline KW - Alzheimer’s disease KW - dementia prevention KW - dementia risk reduction KW - mild cognitive impairment KW - multidomain lifestyle intervention KW - secondary prevention KW - subjective cognitive decline SP - 2397 EP - 2406 JF - Clinical interventions in aging JO - Clin Interv Aging VL - 13 N2 - Background: With no cure for dementia and the number of people living with the condition predicted to rapidly rise, there is an urgent need for dementia risk reduction and prevention interventions. Modifiable lifestyle risk factors have been identified as playing a major role in the development of dementia; hence, interventions addressing these risk factors represent a significant opportunity to reduce the number of people developing dementia. Relatively few interventions have been trialed in older participants with cognitive decline (secondary prevention). Objectives: This study evaluates the efficacy and feasibility of a multidomain lifestyle risk reduction intervention for people with subjective cognitive decline (SCD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: This study is an 8-week, two-arm, single-blind, randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a lifestyle modification program to reduce dementia risk. The active control group receives the following four online educational modules: dementia literacy and lifestyle risk, Mediterranean diet (MeDi), cognitive engagement and physical activity. The intervention group also completes the same educational modules but receives additional practical components including sessions with a dietitian, online brain training and sessions with an exercise physiologist to assist with lifestyle modification. Results: Primary outcome measures are cognition (The Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive-Plus [ADAS-Cog-Plus]) and a composite lifestyle risk factor score for Alzheimer's disease (Australian National University - Alzheimer's Disease Risk Index [ANU-ADRI]). Secondary outcome measures are motivation to change lifestyle (Motivation to Change Lifestyle and Health Behaviour for Dementia Risk Reduction [MCLHB-DRR]) and health-related quality of life (36-item Short Form Health Survey [SF-36]). Feasibility will be determined through adherence to diet (Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener [MEDAS] and Australian Recommended Food Score [ARFS]), cognitive engagement (BrainHQ-derived statistics) and physical activity interventions (physical activity calendars). Outcomes are measured at baseline, immediately post-intervention and at 3- and 6-month follow-up by researchers blind to group allocation. Discussion: If successful and feasible, secondary prevention lifestyle interventions could provide a targeted, cost-effective way to reduce the number of people with cognitive decline going on to develop Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias. SN - 1178-1998 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30538436/Body_Brain_Life_for_Cognitive_Decline__BBL_CD_:_protocol_for_a_multidomain_dementia_risk_reduction_randomized_controlled_trial_for_subjective_cognitive_decline_and_mild_cognitive_impairment_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S182046 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -