Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Body mass index and the risk of acute pancreatitis by etiology: A prospective analysis of Korean National Screening Cohort.
J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2019 Mar; 34(3):603-611.JG

Abstract

BACKGROUND

It is unclear whether obesity increases the incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) in the general population. Further, no study has prospectively examined the associations of the risk of AP by etiology with measured body mass index (BMI) values.

METHODS

A total of 512 928 Korean participants in routine health examinations during 2002-2003 were followed up until 2013 via linkage to national hospital discharge records to assess AP incidence. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios were calculated using BMI measurements.

RESULTS

During 10.5 mean years of follow-up, 1656 persons developed AP (337 gallstone related and 1319 non-gallstone related). Nonlinear associations were found: U-curves for total and non-gallstone-related AP and a reverse L-curve for gallstone-related AP. Each 5 kg/m2 increment in BMI increased gallstone-related AP by 123% (95% confidence interval = 48-234%) and non-gallstone-related AP by 42% (9-84%) in the range ≥ 25 kg/m2 (Pheterogeneity = 0.068). Obese persons had a doubled risk of gallstone-related AP compared with normal-weight persons. In the range < 25 kg/m2 , BMI had inverse association with non-gallstone-related AP but no association with gallstone-related AP (Pheterogeneity < 0.001). In subgroup analyses, for non-gallstone-related AP, hazard ratios per each 5 kg/m2 BMI increment were 0.50 (men), 0.73 (women), 0.46 (alcohol drinkers), 0.69 (alcohol non-drinkers), 0.43 (ever smokers), and 0.73 (never smokers).

CONCLUSIONS

Gallstone-related AP and non-gallstone-related AP have different nonlinear associations with BMI. Higher BMI increases the risk of both gallstone-related AP and non-gallstone-related AP but more strongly for gallstone-related AP. For non-gallstone-related AP, in the range < 25 kg/m2 , BMI has inverse associations that were stronger in men, current alcohol drinkers, and ever smokers than in their counterparts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, International St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University, Gangneung, Korea.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, College of Medicine, Catholic Kwandong University, Gangneung, Korea. Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, College of Medicine, Catholic Kwandong University, Gangneung, Korea.Department of Internal Medicine, International St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University, Gangneung, Korea.Department of Internal Medicine, International St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University, Gangneung, Korea.Department of Internal Medicine, International St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University, Gangneung, Korea.Institute for Occupational and Environmental Health, Catholic Kwandong University, Gangneung, Korea.Department of Internal Medicine, International St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University, Gangneung, Korea.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30552723

Citation

Choi, Ja Sung, et al. "Body Mass Index and the Risk of Acute Pancreatitis By Etiology: a Prospective Analysis of Korean National Screening Cohort." Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 34, no. 3, 2019, pp. 603-611.
Choi JS, Yi SW, Park JW, et al. Body mass index and the risk of acute pancreatitis by etiology: A prospective analysis of Korean National Screening Cohort. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2019;34(3):603-611.
Choi, J. S., Yi, S. W., Park, J. W., Lee, S., Jeong, S. H., Yi, J. J., & Han, K. J. (2019). Body mass index and the risk of acute pancreatitis by etiology: A prospective analysis of Korean National Screening Cohort. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 34(3), 603-611. https://doi.org/10.1111/jgh.14570
Choi JS, et al. Body Mass Index and the Risk of Acute Pancreatitis By Etiology: a Prospective Analysis of Korean National Screening Cohort. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2019;34(3):603-611. PubMed PMID: 30552723.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body mass index and the risk of acute pancreatitis by etiology: A prospective analysis of Korean National Screening Cohort. AU - Choi,Ja Sung, AU - Yi,Sang-Wook, AU - Park,Jin Woo, AU - Lee,Sangheun, AU - Jeong,Seok-Hoo, AU - Yi,Jee-Jeon, AU - Han,Ki Jun, Y1 - 2019/01/08/ PY - 2018/09/18/received PY - 2018/11/13/revised PY - 2018/11/29/accepted PY - 2018/12/16/pubmed PY - 2019/6/18/medline PY - 2018/12/16/entrez KW - body mass index KW - obesity KW - pancreatitis KW - underweight SP - 603 EP - 611 JF - Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology JO - J Gastroenterol Hepatol VL - 34 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether obesity increases the incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) in the general population. Further, no study has prospectively examined the associations of the risk of AP by etiology with measured body mass index (BMI) values. METHODS: A total of 512 928 Korean participants in routine health examinations during 2002-2003 were followed up until 2013 via linkage to national hospital discharge records to assess AP incidence. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios were calculated using BMI measurements. RESULTS: During 10.5 mean years of follow-up, 1656 persons developed AP (337 gallstone related and 1319 non-gallstone related). Nonlinear associations were found: U-curves for total and non-gallstone-related AP and a reverse L-curve for gallstone-related AP. Each 5 kg/m2 increment in BMI increased gallstone-related AP by 123% (95% confidence interval = 48-234%) and non-gallstone-related AP by 42% (9-84%) in the range ≥ 25 kg/m2 (Pheterogeneity = 0.068). Obese persons had a doubled risk of gallstone-related AP compared with normal-weight persons. In the range < 25 kg/m2 , BMI had inverse association with non-gallstone-related AP but no association with gallstone-related AP (Pheterogeneity < 0.001). In subgroup analyses, for non-gallstone-related AP, hazard ratios per each 5 kg/m2 BMI increment were 0.50 (men), 0.73 (women), 0.46 (alcohol drinkers), 0.69 (alcohol non-drinkers), 0.43 (ever smokers), and 0.73 (never smokers). CONCLUSIONS: Gallstone-related AP and non-gallstone-related AP have different nonlinear associations with BMI. Higher BMI increases the risk of both gallstone-related AP and non-gallstone-related AP but more strongly for gallstone-related AP. For non-gallstone-related AP, in the range < 25 kg/m2 , BMI has inverse associations that were stronger in men, current alcohol drinkers, and ever smokers than in their counterparts. SN - 1440-1746 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30552723/Body_mass_index_and_the_risk_of_acute_pancreatitis_by_etiology:_A_prospective_analysis_of_Korean_National_Screening_Cohort_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jgh.14570 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -