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Dispositional Mindfulness and Attentional Control: The Specific Association Between the Mindfulness Facets of Non-judgment and Describing With Flexibility of Early Operating Orienting in Conflict Detection.
Front Psychol 2018; 9:2359FP

Abstract

Background:

A state of mindfulness refers to a present-centered attentional awareness without judging. Being mindful seems to increase the ability to be flexible and adaptive in attention focus according to situational contingencies. The way mindfulness affects such attentional control is often measured with three different but interacting attentional networks of alerting (preparedness), orienting (selection of stimulus), and conflict detection (suppression of irrelevant stimuli). In the current study, the aim was to study the effects of dispositional mindfulness on these attention networks, and specifically the effects on the interactions between these attention networks.

Methods:

Fifty participants between 19 and 29 years old filled out the questionnaire Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) and performed the revised version of the Attention Network Test (ANT-R). The five FFMQ facets of Describing, Non-Judgment, Orienting, Non-Reactivity, and Acting with Awareness were included as predictors in multiple linear regression analyses with the ANT-R scores of alerting, orienting, conflict detection, and the interaction scores of alerting by conflict detection and orienting by conflict detection as outcome variables, respectively.

Results:

Higher dispositional mindfulness as measured with the five FFMQ facets predicted interaction scores (faster reaction times) of orienting by conflict detection, but none of the other ANT-R scores. It was specifically the FFMQ facets of Describing and non-judgment that predicted this lower interaction score of orienting by conflict detection.

Conclusion:

Our findings indicate that being mindful is associated with a more flexible and efficient orienting attention. It is associated with a higher ability to disengage from salient stimuli that is irrelevant to pursue goal-directed behavior (conflict detection).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. KGJebsen Center for Neuropsychiatric Disorders, Bergen, Norway.Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. Bjørgvin District Psychiatric Centre, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. Division of Psychiatry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. Division of Psychiatry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30555383

Citation

Sørensen, Lin, et al. "Dispositional Mindfulness and Attentional Control: the Specific Association Between the Mindfulness Facets of Non-judgment and Describing With Flexibility of Early Operating Orienting in Conflict Detection." Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 9, 2018, p. 2359.
Sørensen L, Osnes B, Visted E, et al. Dispositional Mindfulness and Attentional Control: The Specific Association Between the Mindfulness Facets of Non-judgment and Describing With Flexibility of Early Operating Orienting in Conflict Detection. Front Psychol. 2018;9:2359.
Sørensen, L., Osnes, B., Visted, E., Svendsen, J. L., Adolfsdottir, S., Binder, P. E., & Schanche, E. (2018). Dispositional Mindfulness and Attentional Control: The Specific Association Between the Mindfulness Facets of Non-judgment and Describing With Flexibility of Early Operating Orienting in Conflict Detection. Frontiers in Psychology, 9, p. 2359. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2018.02359.
Sørensen L, et al. Dispositional Mindfulness and Attentional Control: the Specific Association Between the Mindfulness Facets of Non-judgment and Describing With Flexibility of Early Operating Orienting in Conflict Detection. Front Psychol. 2018;9:2359. PubMed PMID: 30555383.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dispositional Mindfulness and Attentional Control: The Specific Association Between the Mindfulness Facets of Non-judgment and Describing With Flexibility of Early Operating Orienting in Conflict Detection. AU - Sørensen,Lin, AU - Osnes,Berge, AU - Visted,Endre, AU - Svendsen,Julie Lillebostad, AU - Adolfsdottir,Steinunn, AU - Binder,Per-Einar, AU - Schanche,Elisabeth, Y1 - 2018/11/29/ PY - 2018/07/25/received PY - 2018/11/10/accepted PY - 2018/12/18/entrez PY - 2018/12/18/pubmed PY - 2018/12/18/medline KW - attention network test (ANT) KW - attention networks KW - five facet mindfulness questionnaire (FFMQ) KW - mindfulness KW - revised attention network test SP - 2359 EP - 2359 JF - Frontiers in psychology JO - Front Psychol VL - 9 N2 - Background: A state of mindfulness refers to a present-centered attentional awareness without judging. Being mindful seems to increase the ability to be flexible and adaptive in attention focus according to situational contingencies. The way mindfulness affects such attentional control is often measured with three different but interacting attentional networks of alerting (preparedness), orienting (selection of stimulus), and conflict detection (suppression of irrelevant stimuli). In the current study, the aim was to study the effects of dispositional mindfulness on these attention networks, and specifically the effects on the interactions between these attention networks. Methods: Fifty participants between 19 and 29 years old filled out the questionnaire Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) and performed the revised version of the Attention Network Test (ANT-R). The five FFMQ facets of Describing, Non-Judgment, Orienting, Non-Reactivity, and Acting with Awareness were included as predictors in multiple linear regression analyses with the ANT-R scores of alerting, orienting, conflict detection, and the interaction scores of alerting by conflict detection and orienting by conflict detection as outcome variables, respectively. Results: Higher dispositional mindfulness as measured with the five FFMQ facets predicted interaction scores (faster reaction times) of orienting by conflict detection, but none of the other ANT-R scores. It was specifically the FFMQ facets of Describing and non-judgment that predicted this lower interaction score of orienting by conflict detection. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that being mindful is associated with a more flexible and efficient orienting attention. It is associated with a higher ability to disengage from salient stimuli that is irrelevant to pursue goal-directed behavior (conflict detection). SN - 1664-1078 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30555383/Dispositional_Mindfulness_and_Attentional_Control:_The_Specific_Association_Between_the_Mindfulness_Facets_of_Non_judgment_and_Describing_With_Flexibility_of_Early_Operating_Orienting_in_Conflict_Detection_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.02359 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -