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Did high sugar-sweetened beverage purchasers respond differently to the excise tax on sugar-sweetened beverages in Mexico?
Public Health Nutr. 2019 Mar; 22(4):750-756.PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To estimate changes in taxed and untaxed beverages by volume of beverage purchased after a sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) tax was introduced in 2014 in Mexico.

DESIGN

We used household purchase data from January 2012 to December 2015. We first classified the sample into four groups based on pre-tax purchases of beverages: (i) higher purchases of taxed beverages and lower purchases of untaxed beverages (HTLU-unhealthier); (ii) higher purchases of both types of beverages (HTHU); (iii) lower purchases of taxed and untaxed beverages (LTLU); and (iv) lower purchases of taxed beverages and higher purchases of untaxed beverages (LTHU-healthier). Next, we estimated differences in purchases after the tax was implemented for each group compared with a counterfactual based on pre-tax trends using a fixed-effects model.

SETTING

Areas with more than 50 000 residents in Mexico.

PARTICIPANTS

Households (n 6089).

RESULTS

The HTLU-unhealthier and HTHU groups had the largest absolute and relative reductions in taxed beverages and increased their purchases of untaxed beverages. Households with lower purchases of untaxed beverages (HTLU-unhealthier and LTLU) had the largest absolute and relative increases in untaxed beverages. We also found that among households with higher purchases of taxed beverages, the group with lowest socio-economic status had the greatest reduction in purchases of taxed beverages.

CONCLUSIONS

Evidence associating the SSB tax with larger reductions among high purchasers of taxed beverages prior to the tax is relevant, as higher SSB purchasers have a greater risk of obesity, diabetes and other cardiometabolic outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition and Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México.Department of Nutrition and Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.Center for Health Systems Research, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Avenida Universidad 655, Colonia Santa María Ahuacatitlán, Cerrada Los Pinos y Caminera, CP62100, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30560754

Citation

Ng, Shu Wen, et al. "Did High Sugar-sweetened Beverage Purchasers Respond Differently to the Excise Tax On Sugar-sweetened Beverages in Mexico?" Public Health Nutrition, vol. 22, no. 4, 2019, pp. 750-756.
Ng SW, Rivera JA, Popkin BM, et al. Did high sugar-sweetened beverage purchasers respond differently to the excise tax on sugar-sweetened beverages in Mexico? Public Health Nutr. 2019;22(4):750-756.
Ng, S. W., Rivera, J. A., Popkin, B. M., & Colchero, M. A. (2019). Did high sugar-sweetened beverage purchasers respond differently to the excise tax on sugar-sweetened beverages in Mexico? Public Health Nutrition, 22(4), 750-756. https://doi.org/10.1017/S136898001800321X
Ng SW, et al. Did High Sugar-sweetened Beverage Purchasers Respond Differently to the Excise Tax On Sugar-sweetened Beverages in Mexico. Public Health Nutr. 2019;22(4):750-756. PubMed PMID: 30560754.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Did high sugar-sweetened beverage purchasers respond differently to the excise tax on sugar-sweetened beverages in Mexico? AU - Ng,Shu Wen, AU - Rivera,Juan A, AU - Popkin,Barry M, AU - Colchero,M Arantxa, Y1 - 2018/12/14/ PY - 2018/12/19/pubmed PY - 2018/12/19/medline PY - 2018/12/19/entrez KW - High consumers KW - Mexico KW - Sugar-sweetened beverages KW - Taxes SP - 750 EP - 756 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 22 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To estimate changes in taxed and untaxed beverages by volume of beverage purchased after a sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) tax was introduced in 2014 in Mexico. DESIGN: We used household purchase data from January 2012 to December 2015. We first classified the sample into four groups based on pre-tax purchases of beverages: (i) higher purchases of taxed beverages and lower purchases of untaxed beverages (HTLU-unhealthier); (ii) higher purchases of both types of beverages (HTHU); (iii) lower purchases of taxed and untaxed beverages (LTLU); and (iv) lower purchases of taxed beverages and higher purchases of untaxed beverages (LTHU-healthier). Next, we estimated differences in purchases after the tax was implemented for each group compared with a counterfactual based on pre-tax trends using a fixed-effects model. SETTING: Areas with more than 50 000 residents in Mexico. PARTICIPANTS: Households (n 6089). RESULTS: The HTLU-unhealthier and HTHU groups had the largest absolute and relative reductions in taxed beverages and increased their purchases of untaxed beverages. Households with lower purchases of untaxed beverages (HTLU-unhealthier and LTLU) had the largest absolute and relative increases in untaxed beverages. We also found that among households with higher purchases of taxed beverages, the group with lowest socio-economic status had the greatest reduction in purchases of taxed beverages. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence associating the SSB tax with larger reductions among high purchasers of taxed beverages prior to the tax is relevant, as higher SSB purchasers have a greater risk of obesity, diabetes and other cardiometabolic outcomes. SN - 1475-2727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30560754/Did_high_sugar_sweetened_beverage_purchasers_respond_differently_to_the_excise_tax_on_sugar_sweetened_beverages_in_Mexico L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S136898001800321X/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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