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Drug, Opioid-Involved, and Heroin-Involved Overdose Deaths Among American Indians and Alaska Natives - Washington, 1999-2015.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2018 Dec 21; 67(50):1384-1387.MM

Abstract

The opioid epidemic has resulted in a threefold increase in drug overdose deaths in the United States during 1999-2015 (1). Whereas American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) have experienced larger increases in drug overdose mortality than have other racial/ethnic groups in the United States (2), little is known about the regional impact of opioids in tribal and urban AI/AN communities. To address this data gap, death records from the Washington State Center for Health Statistics, corrected for misclassification of AI/AN race, were examined to identify trends and disparities in drug, opioid-involved, and heroin-involved overdose mortality rates for AI/AN and non-Hispanic whites (whites) in Washington. Although AI/AN and whites had similar overdose mortality rates during 1999-2001, subsequent overdose rates among AI/AN increased at a faster rate than did those among whites. During 2013-2015, mortality rates among AI/AN were 2.7 and 4.1 times higher than rates among whites for total drug and opioid-involved overdoses and heroin-involved overdoses, respectively. Washington death certificates that were not corrected for misclassification of AI/AN race underestimated drug overdose mortality rates among AI/AN by approximately 40%. National statistics on the opioid epidemic, which report that overdose mortality rates are significantly higher among whites than among AI/AN, are not reflective of regional prevalences, disparities, and trends. Comprehensive efforts to address the opioid epidemic in AI/AN communities rely on strong partnerships between tribal governments and local, state, and federal entities. Additional measures are needed for community-based surveillance, treatment, and prevention to effectively respond to the epidemic across diverse tribal and urban AI/AN communities.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30571673

Citation

Joshi, Sujata, et al. "Drug, Opioid-Involved, and Heroin-Involved Overdose Deaths Among American Indians and Alaska Natives - Washington, 1999-2015." MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 67, no. 50, 2018, pp. 1384-1387.
Joshi S, Weiser T, Warren-Mears V. Drug, Opioid-Involved, and Heroin-Involved Overdose Deaths Among American Indians and Alaska Natives - Washington, 1999-2015. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2018;67(50):1384-1387.
Joshi, S., Weiser, T., & Warren-Mears, V. (2018). Drug, Opioid-Involved, and Heroin-Involved Overdose Deaths Among American Indians and Alaska Natives - Washington, 1999-2015. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 67(50), 1384-1387. https://doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6750a2
Joshi S, Weiser T, Warren-Mears V. Drug, Opioid-Involved, and Heroin-Involved Overdose Deaths Among American Indians and Alaska Natives - Washington, 1999-2015. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2018 Dec 21;67(50):1384-1387. PubMed PMID: 30571673.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Drug, Opioid-Involved, and Heroin-Involved Overdose Deaths Among American Indians and Alaska Natives - Washington, 1999-2015. AU - Joshi,Sujata, AU - Weiser,Thomas, AU - Warren-Mears,Victoria, Y1 - 2018/12/21/ PY - 2018/12/21/entrez PY - 2018/12/21/pubmed PY - 2018/12/24/medline SP - 1384 EP - 1387 JF - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report JO - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep VL - 67 IS - 50 N2 - The opioid epidemic has resulted in a threefold increase in drug overdose deaths in the United States during 1999-2015 (1). Whereas American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) have experienced larger increases in drug overdose mortality than have other racial/ethnic groups in the United States (2), little is known about the regional impact of opioids in tribal and urban AI/AN communities. To address this data gap, death records from the Washington State Center for Health Statistics, corrected for misclassification of AI/AN race, were examined to identify trends and disparities in drug, opioid-involved, and heroin-involved overdose mortality rates for AI/AN and non-Hispanic whites (whites) in Washington. Although AI/AN and whites had similar overdose mortality rates during 1999-2001, subsequent overdose rates among AI/AN increased at a faster rate than did those among whites. During 2013-2015, mortality rates among AI/AN were 2.7 and 4.1 times higher than rates among whites for total drug and opioid-involved overdoses and heroin-involved overdoses, respectively. Washington death certificates that were not corrected for misclassification of AI/AN race underestimated drug overdose mortality rates among AI/AN by approximately 40%. National statistics on the opioid epidemic, which report that overdose mortality rates are significantly higher among whites than among AI/AN, are not reflective of regional prevalences, disparities, and trends. Comprehensive efforts to address the opioid epidemic in AI/AN communities rely on strong partnerships between tribal governments and local, state, and federal entities. Additional measures are needed for community-based surveillance, treatment, and prevention to effectively respond to the epidemic across diverse tribal and urban AI/AN communities. SN - 1545-861X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30571673/Drug_Opioid_Involved_and_Heroin_Involved_Overdose_Deaths_Among_American_Indians_and_Alaska_Natives___Washington_1999_2015_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6750a2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -