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Physical fitness in relation to later body composition in pre-school children.
J Sci Med Sport 2019; 22(5):574-579JS

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Although physical fitness is considered a marker of health in youth, little is known whether physical fitness in pre-school age is related to later body composition. Thus, this study investigated (i) associations of physical fitness at 4.5years of age with body composition 12months later and (ii) whether improvements in physical fitness during the 12-month follow-up were associated with changes in body composition.

DESIGN

This study included 142 children, measured at 4.5 and 5.5years, from the control group of the MINISTOP trial.

METHODS

Physical fitness (cardiorespiratory fitness, lower- and upper-body muscular strength and motor fitness) was measured using the PREFIT test battery. Body composition was assessed using air-displacement plethysmography.

RESULTS

In adjusted regression analyses, greater cardiorespiratory fitness, lower-body muscular strength and motor fitness at 4.5years were associated with a lower fat mass index at 5.5years (standardized β=-0.182 to -0.229, p≤0.028). Conversely, greater cardiorespiratory fitness, lower- and upper-body muscular strength as well as motor fitness at 4.5years of age were associated with a higher fat-free mass index (standardized β=0.255-0.447, p≤0.001). Furthermore, improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness, lower-body muscular strength and motor fitness during the 12-month follow-up period were associated with decreases in fat mass index and/or % fat mass.

CONCLUSIONS

In conclusion, the results of this study provide evidence of the importance of physical fitness early in life. Nevertheless, further studies are needed in order to clarify the influence of physical fitness in the pre-school age with later health outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden; PROFITH "PROmoting FITness and Health Through Physical Activity" Research Group, Department of Physical Education and Sports, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Spain. Electronic address: pontus.henriksson@ki.se.Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyvaskyla, Finland.Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden; PROFITH "PROmoting FITness and Health Through Physical Activity" Research Group, Department of Physical Education and Sports, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Spain.Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Healthy Active Living and Obesity (HALO) Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Canada.PROFITH "PROmoting FITness and Health Through Physical Activity" Research Group, Department of Physical Education and Sports, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Spain.Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; PROFITH "PROmoting FITness and Health Through Physical Activity" Research Group, Department of Physical Education and Sports, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Spain.Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; PROFITH "PROmoting FITness and Health Through Physical Activity" Research Group, Department of Physical Education and Sports, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Spain.Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30573178

Citation

Henriksson, Pontus, et al. "Physical Fitness in Relation to Later Body Composition in Pre-school Children." Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, vol. 22, no. 5, 2019, pp. 574-579.
Henriksson P, Leppänen MH, Henriksson H, et al. Physical fitness in relation to later body composition in pre-school children. J Sci Med Sport. 2019;22(5):574-579.
Henriksson, P., Leppänen, M. H., Henriksson, H., Delisle Nyström, C., Cadenas-Sanchez, C., Ek, A., ... Löf, M. (2019). Physical fitness in relation to later body composition in pre-school children. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 22(5), pp. 574-579. doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2018.11.024.
Henriksson P, et al. Physical Fitness in Relation to Later Body Composition in Pre-school Children. J Sci Med Sport. 2019;22(5):574-579. PubMed PMID: 30573178.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physical fitness in relation to later body composition in pre-school children. AU - Henriksson,Pontus, AU - Leppänen,Marja H, AU - Henriksson,Hanna, AU - Delisle Nyström,Christine, AU - Cadenas-Sanchez,Cristina, AU - Ek,Anna, AU - Ruiz,Jonatan R, AU - Ortega,Francisco B, AU - Löf,Marie, Y1 - 2018/12/07/ PY - 2018/04/22/received PY - 2018/11/14/revised PY - 2018/11/27/accepted PY - 2018/12/24/pubmed PY - 2019/5/28/medline PY - 2018/12/22/entrez KW - Cardiorespiratory fitness KW - Fat mass KW - Fat-free mass KW - Motor fitness KW - Muscular strength KW - Pre-school SP - 574 EP - 579 JF - Journal of science and medicine in sport JO - J Sci Med Sport VL - 22 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Although physical fitness is considered a marker of health in youth, little is known whether physical fitness in pre-school age is related to later body composition. Thus, this study investigated (i) associations of physical fitness at 4.5years of age with body composition 12months later and (ii) whether improvements in physical fitness during the 12-month follow-up were associated with changes in body composition. DESIGN: This study included 142 children, measured at 4.5 and 5.5years, from the control group of the MINISTOP trial. METHODS: Physical fitness (cardiorespiratory fitness, lower- and upper-body muscular strength and motor fitness) was measured using the PREFIT test battery. Body composition was assessed using air-displacement plethysmography. RESULTS: In adjusted regression analyses, greater cardiorespiratory fitness, lower-body muscular strength and motor fitness at 4.5years were associated with a lower fat mass index at 5.5years (standardized β=-0.182 to -0.229, p≤0.028). Conversely, greater cardiorespiratory fitness, lower- and upper-body muscular strength as well as motor fitness at 4.5years of age were associated with a higher fat-free mass index (standardized β=0.255-0.447, p≤0.001). Furthermore, improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness, lower-body muscular strength and motor fitness during the 12-month follow-up period were associated with decreases in fat mass index and/or % fat mass. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, the results of this study provide evidence of the importance of physical fitness early in life. Nevertheless, further studies are needed in order to clarify the influence of physical fitness in the pre-school age with later health outcomes. SN - 1878-1861 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30573178/Physical_fitness_in_relation_to_later_body_composition_in_pre_school_children_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1440-2440(18)31221-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -