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The link between idiopathic intracranial hypertension, fibromyalgia, and chronic fatigue syndrome: exploration of a shared pathophysiology.
J Pain Res. 2018; 11:3129-3140.JP

Abstract

Purpose

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IICH) is a condition characterized by raised intracranial pressure (ICP), and its diagnosis is established when the opening pressure measured during a lumbar puncture is elevated >20 cm H2O in nonobese patients or >25 cm H2O in obese patients. Papilledema is caused by forced filling of the optic nerve sheath with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Other common but underappreciated symptoms of IICH are neck pain, back pain, and radicular pain in the arms and legs resulting from associated increased spinal pressure and forced filling of the spinal nerves with CSF. Widespread pain and also several other characteristics of IICH share notable similarities with characteristics of fibromyalgia (FM) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), two overlapping chronic pain conditions. The aim of this review was to compare literature data regarding the characteristics of IICH, FM, and CFS and to link the shared data to an apparent underlying physiopathology, that is, increased ICP.

Methods

Data in the literature regarding these three conditions were compared and linked to the hypothesis of the shared underlying physiopathology of increased cerebrospinal pressure.

Results

The shared characteristics of IICH, FM, and CFS that can be caused by increased ICP include headaches, fatigue, cognitive impairment, loss of gray matter, involvement of cranial nerves, and overload of the lymphatic olfactory pathway. Increased pressure in the spinal canal and in peripheral nerve root sheaths causes widespread pain, weakness in the arms and legs, walking difficulties (ataxia), and bladder, bowel, and sphincter symptoms. Additionally, IICH, FM, and CFS are frequently associated with sympathetic overactivity symptoms and obesity. These conditions share a strong female predominance and are frequently associated with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

Conclusion

IICH, FM, and CFS share a large variety of symptoms that might all be explained by the same pathophysiology of increased cerebrospinal pressure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Kinesiology and Rehabilitation Sciences, Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Research Unit, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium, miekehulens@skynet.be.Department of Neurosurgery, Sint-Jozefziekenhuis, Bornem, Belgium.Department of Social and Primary Health Care, Public Health Nutrition, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.Department of Neurosciences, Ophthalmology Research Group, University of Leuven KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospitals UZ Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.Clinical Electromyography Laboratory, Department of Academic Consultants, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospitals UZ Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Kinesiology and Rehabilitation Sciences, Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Research Unit, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium, miekehulens@skynet.be.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30573989

Citation

Hulens, Mieke, et al. "The Link Between Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension, Fibromyalgia, and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Exploration of a Shared Pathophysiology." Journal of Pain Research, vol. 11, 2018, pp. 3129-3140.
Hulens M, Rasschaert R, Vansant G, et al. The link between idiopathic intracranial hypertension, fibromyalgia, and chronic fatigue syndrome: exploration of a shared pathophysiology. J Pain Res. 2018;11:3129-3140.
Hulens, M., Rasschaert, R., Vansant, G., Stalmans, I., Bruyninckx, F., & Dankaerts, W. (2018). The link between idiopathic intracranial hypertension, fibromyalgia, and chronic fatigue syndrome: exploration of a shared pathophysiology. Journal of Pain Research, 11, 3129-3140. https://doi.org/10.2147/JPR.S186878
Hulens M, et al. The Link Between Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension, Fibromyalgia, and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Exploration of a Shared Pathophysiology. J Pain Res. 2018;11:3129-3140. PubMed PMID: 30573989.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The link between idiopathic intracranial hypertension, fibromyalgia, and chronic fatigue syndrome: exploration of a shared pathophysiology. AU - Hulens,Mieke, AU - Rasschaert,Ricky, AU - Vansant,Greet, AU - Stalmans,Ingeborg, AU - Bruyninckx,Frans, AU - Dankaerts,Wim, Y1 - 2018/12/10/ PY - 2018/12/22/entrez PY - 2018/12/24/pubmed PY - 2018/12/24/medline KW - Ehlers-Danlos KW - Ménière’s disease KW - Tarlov cysts KW - chronic pain KW - fatigue KW - headache KW - lymphatic olfactory pathway KW - small fiber neuropathy KW - sympathetic activity SP - 3129 EP - 3140 JF - Journal of pain research JO - J Pain Res VL - 11 N2 - Purpose: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IICH) is a condition characterized by raised intracranial pressure (ICP), and its diagnosis is established when the opening pressure measured during a lumbar puncture is elevated >20 cm H2O in nonobese patients or >25 cm H2O in obese patients. Papilledema is caused by forced filling of the optic nerve sheath with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Other common but underappreciated symptoms of IICH are neck pain, back pain, and radicular pain in the arms and legs resulting from associated increased spinal pressure and forced filling of the spinal nerves with CSF. Widespread pain and also several other characteristics of IICH share notable similarities with characteristics of fibromyalgia (FM) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), two overlapping chronic pain conditions. The aim of this review was to compare literature data regarding the characteristics of IICH, FM, and CFS and to link the shared data to an apparent underlying physiopathology, that is, increased ICP. Methods: Data in the literature regarding these three conditions were compared and linked to the hypothesis of the shared underlying physiopathology of increased cerebrospinal pressure. Results: The shared characteristics of IICH, FM, and CFS that can be caused by increased ICP include headaches, fatigue, cognitive impairment, loss of gray matter, involvement of cranial nerves, and overload of the lymphatic olfactory pathway. Increased pressure in the spinal canal and in peripheral nerve root sheaths causes widespread pain, weakness in the arms and legs, walking difficulties (ataxia), and bladder, bowel, and sphincter symptoms. Additionally, IICH, FM, and CFS are frequently associated with sympathetic overactivity symptoms and obesity. These conditions share a strong female predominance and are frequently associated with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Conclusion: IICH, FM, and CFS share a large variety of symptoms that might all be explained by the same pathophysiology of increased cerebrospinal pressure. SN - 1178-7090 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30573989/The_link_between_idiopathic_intracranial_hypertension_fibromyalgia_and_chronic_fatigue_syndrome:_exploration_of_a_shared_pathophysiology_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JPR.S186878 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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