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Legality of Embryonic Gene Editing in Australia.
J Law Med. 2018 Dec; 26(2):356-373.JL

Abstract

The CRISPR-cas9 genome editing system (CRISPR) has been used to make precise and heritable changes to a diverse range of animals. The use of CRISPR to edit embryonic cells initially raised widespread criticism and calls for an international ban. However, the rapid development of genome editing has prompted governments around the world to review the regulatory frameworks that oversee genetic technologies. In Australia, the Prohibition of Human Cloning for Reproduction Act 2002 (Cth) and the Research Involving Human Embryos Act 2002 (Cth) expressly regulate the use of genome editing in early human embryos. This article analyses how these two Acts regulate research involving CRISPR and the implications of this for research practices in Australia. We argue that, given the current regulatory uncertainty around the legality of genome editing research in Australia, legislative reform is needed and propose reforms to provide greater clarity in this area.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Senior Lecturer, Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.Research Fellow, Murdoch Children's Research Institute; Department of Paediatrics, Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30574724

Citation

Taylor-Sands, Michelle, and Christopher Gyngell. "Legality of Embryonic Gene Editing in Australia." Journal of Law and Medicine, vol. 26, no. 2, 2018, pp. 356-373.
Taylor-Sands M, Gyngell C. Legality of Embryonic Gene Editing in Australia. J Law Med. 2018;26(2):356-373.
Taylor-Sands, M., & Gyngell, C. (2018). Legality of Embryonic Gene Editing in Australia. Journal of Law and Medicine, 26(2), 356-373.
Taylor-Sands M, Gyngell C. Legality of Embryonic Gene Editing in Australia. J Law Med. 2018;26(2):356-373. PubMed PMID: 30574724.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Legality of Embryonic Gene Editing in Australia. AU - Taylor-Sands,Michelle, AU - Gyngell,Christopher, PY - 2018/12/22/entrez PY - 2018/12/24/pubmed PY - 2019/6/27/medline KW - CRISPR-cas9 KW - gene editing KW - genome editing KW - human embryo KW - statutory interpretation SP - 356 EP - 373 JF - Journal of law and medicine JO - J Law Med VL - 26 IS - 2 N2 - The CRISPR-cas9 genome editing system (CRISPR) has been used to make precise and heritable changes to a diverse range of animals. The use of CRISPR to edit embryonic cells initially raised widespread criticism and calls for an international ban. However, the rapid development of genome editing has prompted governments around the world to review the regulatory frameworks that oversee genetic technologies. In Australia, the Prohibition of Human Cloning for Reproduction Act 2002 (Cth) and the Research Involving Human Embryos Act 2002 (Cth) expressly regulate the use of genome editing in early human embryos. This article analyses how these two Acts regulate research involving CRISPR and the implications of this for research practices in Australia. We argue that, given the current regulatory uncertainty around the legality of genome editing research in Australia, legislative reform is needed and propose reforms to provide greater clarity in this area. SN - 1320-159X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30574724/Legality_of_Embryonic_Gene_Editing_in_Australia_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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