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Injection laryngoplasty in neonates and young children with unilateral vocal fold immobility.
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2019 Feb; 117:127-130.IJ

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Although injection laryngoplasty (IL) is a well-accepted treatment strategy in older children and adults with unilateral vocal fold immobility (UVFI), its efficacy and safety have not been well studied in neonates and young children.

OBJECTIVES

The main objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic effects of IL on aspiration & dysphagia in neonates and young children with UVFI.

METHODS

This was a retrospective chart review of infants and children who underwent IL at a tertiary children's hospital. The primary endpoints were improved aspiration and avoidance of gastrostomy tube placement. Additional endpoints included adverse airway and swallowing effects of IL.

RESULTS

Eight patients were included in this case series. A total of 10 injection laryngoplasties were performed. Average corrected age of patients undergoing IL was 1.22 years(range 0.5-3.6 y). Seven out of 8 patients had preoperative modified barium swallow (MBS). Five out of seven showed improvement in aspiration. Three out of six (50%) patients who did not have gastrostomy tube preoperatively, were able to avoid gastrostomy tube. No adverse effects were noted following IL. One patient with severe tracheomalacia ultimately required tracheostomy 5 months after IL.

CONCLUSION

Injection laryngoplasty appears to be a safe and effective therapeutic option in neonates and young children with unilateral vocal cord immobility and associated aspiration. It may be an effective treatment to improve aspiration and avoid gastrostomy tube placement. Further investigation is warranted.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE

4.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Florida Atlantic University, Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, USA.Florida Atlantic University, Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, USA; Joe DiMaggio Children's Hospital, Hollywood, FL, USA.Joe DiMaggio Children's Hospital, Hollywood, FL, USA.Florida Atlantic University, Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, USA; Joe DiMaggio Children's Hospital, Hollywood, FL, USA. Electronic address: sostrower@mhs.net.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30579066

Citation

Shapiro, Stephen Z., et al. "Injection Laryngoplasty in Neonates and Young Children With Unilateral Vocal Fold Immobility." International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, vol. 117, 2019, pp. 127-130.
Shapiro SZ, Brietzke SE, Shah SV, et al. Injection laryngoplasty in neonates and young children with unilateral vocal fold immobility. Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2019;117:127-130.
Shapiro, S. Z., Brietzke, S. E., Shah, S. V., & Ostrower, S. T. (2019). Injection laryngoplasty in neonates and young children with unilateral vocal fold immobility. International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 117, 127-130. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijporl.2018.11.020
Shapiro SZ, et al. Injection Laryngoplasty in Neonates and Young Children With Unilateral Vocal Fold Immobility. Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2019;117:127-130. PubMed PMID: 30579066.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Injection laryngoplasty in neonates and young children with unilateral vocal fold immobility. AU - Shapiro,Stephen Z, AU - Brietzke,Scott E, AU - Shah,Sweeti V, AU - Ostrower,Samuel T, Y1 - 2018/11/19/ PY - 2018/08/24/received PY - 2018/11/14/revised PY - 2018/11/15/accepted PY - 2018/12/24/pubmed PY - 2019/3/14/medline PY - 2018/12/23/entrez KW - Aspiration KW - Injection laryngoplasty KW - Pediatric KW - Vocal fold immobility SP - 127 EP - 130 JF - International journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology JO - Int. J. Pediatr. Otorhinolaryngol. VL - 117 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Although injection laryngoplasty (IL) is a well-accepted treatment strategy in older children and adults with unilateral vocal fold immobility (UVFI), its efficacy and safety have not been well studied in neonates and young children. OBJECTIVES: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic effects of IL on aspiration & dysphagia in neonates and young children with UVFI. METHODS: This was a retrospective chart review of infants and children who underwent IL at a tertiary children's hospital. The primary endpoints were improved aspiration and avoidance of gastrostomy tube placement. Additional endpoints included adverse airway and swallowing effects of IL. RESULTS: Eight patients were included in this case series. A total of 10 injection laryngoplasties were performed. Average corrected age of patients undergoing IL was 1.22 years(range 0.5-3.6 y). Seven out of 8 patients had preoperative modified barium swallow (MBS). Five out of seven showed improvement in aspiration. Three out of six (50%) patients who did not have gastrostomy tube preoperatively, were able to avoid gastrostomy tube. No adverse effects were noted following IL. One patient with severe tracheomalacia ultimately required tracheostomy 5 months after IL. CONCLUSION: Injection laryngoplasty appears to be a safe and effective therapeutic option in neonates and young children with unilateral vocal cord immobility and associated aspiration. It may be an effective treatment to improve aspiration and avoid gastrostomy tube placement. Further investigation is warranted. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4. SN - 1872-8464 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30579066/Injection_laryngoplasty_in_neonates_and_young_children_with_unilateral_vocal_fold_immobility_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-5876(18)30582-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -