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Cough and the common cold.

Abstract

To determine whether the cough of the common cold arises from upper respiratory stimuli and whether antihistamine-decongestant therapy is an effective treatment for this cough, we prospectively evaluated volunteers with uncomplicated common colds in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. After completing a standardized questionnaire and undergoing a physical examination, throat-culturing, and pulmonary function testing, subjects took the active drug or identical-appearing placebo for 7 days while they kept a diary in which they ranked the severity of 17 symptoms for 14 days. Pulmonary function testing was repeated, on average, on Days 4, 8, and 14. Forty-six percent of the variation in cough severity could be explained by throat-clearing and 47% of the variation in throat-clearing severity by postnasal drip. FIF50%, the only physiologic parameter that significantly correlated with cough, rose as cough severity fell. Antihistamine-decongestant therapy reduced postnasal drip and significantly decreased the severity of cough, nasal obstruction, nasal discharge, and throat-clearing during the first few days of the common cold. In addition, cough was 20 to 30% less prevalent in the active drug group within 3 days of starting therapy. We conclude that the cough of the common cold arose from upper respiratory tract stimuli and that cough and other cardinal symptoms of the common cold were reduced with antihistamine-decongestant therapy when these symptoms were at their worst.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester 01655.

    , , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Brompheniramine
    Clinical Trials as Topic
    Common Cold
    Cough
    Double-Blind Method
    Drug Therapy, Combination
    Ephedrine
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Prospective Studies
    Random Allocation
    Respiratory Function Tests

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    3057962

    Citation

    Curley, F J., et al. "Cough and the Common Cold." The American Review of Respiratory Disease, vol. 138, no. 2, 1988, pp. 305-11.
    Curley FJ, Irwin RS, Pratter MR, et al. Cough and the common cold. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1988;138(2):305-11.
    Curley, F. J., Irwin, R. S., Pratter, M. R., Stivers, D. H., Doern, G. V., Vernaglia, P. A., ... Baker, S. P. (1988). Cough and the common cold. The American Review of Respiratory Disease, 138(2), pp. 305-11.
    Curley FJ, et al. Cough and the Common Cold. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1988;138(2):305-11. PubMed PMID: 3057962.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Cough and the common cold. AU - Curley,F J, AU - Irwin,R S, AU - Pratter,M R, AU - Stivers,D H, AU - Doern,G V, AU - Vernaglia,P A, AU - Larkin,A B, AU - Baker,S P, PY - 1988/8/1/pubmed PY - 1988/8/1/medline PY - 1988/8/1/entrez SP - 305 EP - 11 JF - The American review of respiratory disease JO - Am. Rev. Respir. Dis. VL - 138 IS - 2 N2 - To determine whether the cough of the common cold arises from upper respiratory stimuli and whether antihistamine-decongestant therapy is an effective treatment for this cough, we prospectively evaluated volunteers with uncomplicated common colds in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. After completing a standardized questionnaire and undergoing a physical examination, throat-culturing, and pulmonary function testing, subjects took the active drug or identical-appearing placebo for 7 days while they kept a diary in which they ranked the severity of 17 symptoms for 14 days. Pulmonary function testing was repeated, on average, on Days 4, 8, and 14. Forty-six percent of the variation in cough severity could be explained by throat-clearing and 47% of the variation in throat-clearing severity by postnasal drip. FIF50%, the only physiologic parameter that significantly correlated with cough, rose as cough severity fell. Antihistamine-decongestant therapy reduced postnasal drip and significantly decreased the severity of cough, nasal obstruction, nasal discharge, and throat-clearing during the first few days of the common cold. In addition, cough was 20 to 30% less prevalent in the active drug group within 3 days of starting therapy. We conclude that the cough of the common cold arose from upper respiratory tract stimuli and that cough and other cardinal symptoms of the common cold were reduced with antihistamine-decongestant therapy when these symptoms were at their worst. SN - 0003-0805 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3057962/Cough_and_the_common_cold_ L2 - http://www.atsjournals.org/doi/full/10.1164/ajrccm/138.2.305?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -