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Spider-Web-Inspired Stretchable Graphene Woven Fabric for Highly Sensitive, Transparent, Wearable Strain Sensors.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces. 2019 Jan 16; 11(2):2282-2294.AA

Abstract

Advanced wearable strain sensors with high sensitivity and stretchability are an essential component of flexible and soft electronic devices. Conventional metal- and semiconductor-based strain sensors are rigid, fragile, and opaque, restricting their applications in wearable electronics. Graphene-based percolative structures possess high flexibility and transparency but lack high sensitivity and stretchability. Inspired by the highly flexible spider web architecture, we propose semitransparent, ultrasensitive, and wearable strain sensors made from an elastomer-filled graphene woven fabric (E-GWF) for monitoring human physiological signals. The highly flexible elastomer microskeleton and the hierarchical structure of a graphene tube offer the strain sensor with both excellent sensing and switching capabilities. Two different types of E-GWF sensors, including freestanding E-GWF and E-GWF/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composites, are developed. When their structure is controlled and optimized, the E-GWF strain sensors simultaneously exhibit extraordinary characteristics, such as a high gauge factor (70 at 10% strain, which ascends to 282 at 20%) in respect to other semitransparent or transparent strain sensors, a broad sensing range up to 30%, and excellent linearity. The E-GWF/PDMS composite sensor shows a unique reversible switching behavior at a high strain level of 30-50%, making it a suitable material for fast and reversible strain switching required in many early warning systems. With a view to real-world applications of these sensors and switches, we demonstrate human motion detection and switch controls of light-emitting-diode lamps and liquid-crystal-display circuits. Their unique structure and capabilities can find a wide range of practical applications, such as health monitoring, medical diagnosis, early warning systems for structural failure, and wearable displays.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering , The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology , Clear Water Bay , Kowloon , Hong Kong.Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering , The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology , Clear Water Bay , Kowloon , Hong Kong.Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering , The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology , Clear Water Bay , Kowloon , Hong Kong.Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering , The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology , Clear Water Bay , Kowloon , Hong Kong. Institute for Advanced Study , The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology , Clear Water Bay , Hong Kong.Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering , The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology , Clear Water Bay , Kowloon , Hong Kong.Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering , The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology , Clear Water Bay , Kowloon , Hong Kong.Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering , The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology , Clear Water Bay , Kowloon , Hong Kong.Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering , The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology , Clear Water Bay , Kowloon , Hong Kong.Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering , The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology , Clear Water Bay , Kowloon , Hong Kong.Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering , The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology , Clear Water Bay , Kowloon , Hong Kong.Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering , The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology , Clear Water Bay , Kowloon , Hong Kong.Centre for Advanced Materials Technology, School of Aerospace, Mechanical & Mechatronic Engineering , The University of Sydney , Sydney , NSW 2006 , Australia.Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering , The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology , Clear Water Bay , Kowloon , Hong Kong.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30582684

Citation

Liu, Xu, et al. "Spider-Web-Inspired Stretchable Graphene Woven Fabric for Highly Sensitive, Transparent, Wearable Strain Sensors." ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, vol. 11, no. 2, 2019, pp. 2282-2294.
Liu X, Liu D, Lee JH, et al. Spider-Web-Inspired Stretchable Graphene Woven Fabric for Highly Sensitive, Transparent, Wearable Strain Sensors. ACS Appl Mater Interfaces. 2019;11(2):2282-2294.
Liu, X., Liu, D., Lee, J. H., Zheng, Q., Du, X., Zhang, X., Xu, H., Wang, Z., Wu, Y., Shen, X., Cui, J., Mai, Y. W., & Kim, J. K. (2019). Spider-Web-Inspired Stretchable Graphene Woven Fabric for Highly Sensitive, Transparent, Wearable Strain Sensors. ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, 11(2), 2282-2294. https://doi.org/10.1021/acsami.8b18312
Liu X, et al. Spider-Web-Inspired Stretchable Graphene Woven Fabric for Highly Sensitive, Transparent, Wearable Strain Sensors. ACS Appl Mater Interfaces. 2019 Jan 16;11(2):2282-2294. PubMed PMID: 30582684.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Spider-Web-Inspired Stretchable Graphene Woven Fabric for Highly Sensitive, Transparent, Wearable Strain Sensors. AU - Liu,Xu, AU - Liu,Dan, AU - Lee,Jeng-Hun, AU - Zheng,Qingbin, AU - Du,Xiaohan, AU - Zhang,Xinyue, AU - Xu,Hongru, AU - Wang,Zhenyu, AU - Wu,Ying, AU - Shen,Xi, AU - Cui,Jiang, AU - Mai,Yiu-Wing, AU - Kim,Jang-Kyo, Y1 - 2019/01/07/ PY - 2018/12/26/pubmed PY - 2019/7/31/medline PY - 2018/12/25/entrez KW - graphene woven fabric KW - spider web KW - strain sensor KW - stretchable KW - transparent SP - 2282 EP - 2294 JF - ACS applied materials & interfaces JO - ACS Appl Mater Interfaces VL - 11 IS - 2 N2 - Advanced wearable strain sensors with high sensitivity and stretchability are an essential component of flexible and soft electronic devices. Conventional metal- and semiconductor-based strain sensors are rigid, fragile, and opaque, restricting their applications in wearable electronics. Graphene-based percolative structures possess high flexibility and transparency but lack high sensitivity and stretchability. Inspired by the highly flexible spider web architecture, we propose semitransparent, ultrasensitive, and wearable strain sensors made from an elastomer-filled graphene woven fabric (E-GWF) for monitoring human physiological signals. The highly flexible elastomer microskeleton and the hierarchical structure of a graphene tube offer the strain sensor with both excellent sensing and switching capabilities. Two different types of E-GWF sensors, including freestanding E-GWF and E-GWF/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composites, are developed. When their structure is controlled and optimized, the E-GWF strain sensors simultaneously exhibit extraordinary characteristics, such as a high gauge factor (70 at 10% strain, which ascends to 282 at 20%) in respect to other semitransparent or transparent strain sensors, a broad sensing range up to 30%, and excellent linearity. The E-GWF/PDMS composite sensor shows a unique reversible switching behavior at a high strain level of 30-50%, making it a suitable material for fast and reversible strain switching required in many early warning systems. With a view to real-world applications of these sensors and switches, we demonstrate human motion detection and switch controls of light-emitting-diode lamps and liquid-crystal-display circuits. Their unique structure and capabilities can find a wide range of practical applications, such as health monitoring, medical diagnosis, early warning systems for structural failure, and wearable displays. SN - 1944-8252 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30582684/Spider_Web_Inspired_Stretchable_Graphene_Woven_Fabric_for_Highly_Sensitive_Transparent_Wearable_Strain_Sensors_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsami.8b18312 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -