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Contaminants removal and bacterial activity enhancement along the flow path of constructed wetland microbial fuel cells.
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Feb 20; 652:1195-1208.ST

Abstract

Microbial fuel cells implemented in constructed wetlands (CW-MFCs), albeit a relatively new technology still under study, have shown to improve treatment efficiency of urban wastewater. So far the vast majority of CW-MFC systems investigated were designed as lab-scale systems working under rather unrealistic hydraulic conditions using synthetic wastewater. The main objective of this work was to quantify CW-MFCs performance operated under different conditions in a more realistic setup using meso-scale systems with horizontal flow fed with real urban wastewater. Operational conditions tested were organic loading rate (4.9 ± 1.6, 6.7 ± 1.4 and 13.6 ± 3.2 g COD/m2·day) and hydraulic regime (continuous vs. intermittent feeding) as well as different electrical connections: CW control (conventional CW without electrodes), open-circuit CW-MFC (external circuit between anode and cathode not connected) and closed-circuit CW-MFC (external circuit connected). Eight horizontal subsurface flow CWs were operated for about four months. Each wetland consisted of a PVC reservoir of 0.193 m2 filled with 4/8 mm granitic riverine gravel (wetted depth 25 cm). All wetlands had intermediate sampling points for gravel and interstitial liquid sampling. The CW-MFCs were designed as three MFCs incorporated one after the other along the flow path of the CWs. Anodes consisted of gravel with an incorporated current collector (stainless steel mesh) and the cathode consisted of a graphite felt layer. Electrodes of closed-circuit CW-MFC systems were connected externally over a 220 Ω resistance. Results showed no significant differences between tested organic loading rates, hydraulic regimes or electrical connections, however, on average, systems operated in closed-circuit CW-MFC mode under continuous flow outperformed the other experimental conditions. Closed-circuit CW-MFC compared to conventional CW control systems showed around 5% and 22% higher COD and ammonium removal, respectively. Correspondingly, overall bacteria activity, as measured by the fluorescein diacetate technique, was higher (4% to 34%) in closed-circuit systems when compared to CW control systems.

Authors+Show Affiliations

GEMMA - Environmental Engineering and Microbiology Research Group, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya·BarcelonaTech, c/ Jordi Girona 1-3, Building D1, E-08034 Barcelona, Spain; Department of Green Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Gent, Belgium.Grupo Ciencia e Ingeniería del Agua y el Ambiente, Facultad de Ingeniería, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Carrera 7 No. 40 - 62, Bogotá D.C., Colombia.GEMMA - Environmental Engineering and Microbiology Research Group, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya·BarcelonaTech, c/ Jordi Girona 1-3, Building D1, E-08034 Barcelona, Spain.Department of Green Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Gent, Belgium.Department of Green Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Gent, Belgium.GEMMA - Environmental Engineering and Microbiology Research Group, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya·BarcelonaTech, c/ Jordi Girona 1-3, Building D1, E-08034 Barcelona, Spain.GEMMA - Environmental Engineering and Microbiology Research Group, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya·BarcelonaTech, c/ Jordi Girona 1-3, Building D1, E-08034 Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: Jaume.Puigagut@upc.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30586806

Citation

Hartl, Marco, et al. "Contaminants Removal and Bacterial Activity Enhancement Along the Flow Path of Constructed Wetland Microbial Fuel Cells." The Science of the Total Environment, vol. 652, 2019, pp. 1195-1208.
Hartl M, Bedoya-Ríos DF, Fernández-Gatell M, et al. Contaminants removal and bacterial activity enhancement along the flow path of constructed wetland microbial fuel cells. Sci Total Environ. 2019;652:1195-1208.
Hartl, M., Bedoya-Ríos, D. F., Fernández-Gatell, M., Rousseau, D. P. L., Du Laing, G., Garfí, M., & Puigagut, J. (2019). Contaminants removal and bacterial activity enhancement along the flow path of constructed wetland microbial fuel cells. The Science of the Total Environment, 652, 1195-1208. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.10.234
Hartl M, et al. Contaminants Removal and Bacterial Activity Enhancement Along the Flow Path of Constructed Wetland Microbial Fuel Cells. Sci Total Environ. 2019 Feb 20;652:1195-1208. PubMed PMID: 30586806.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Contaminants removal and bacterial activity enhancement along the flow path of constructed wetland microbial fuel cells. AU - Hartl,Marco, AU - Bedoya-Ríos,Diego F, AU - Fernández-Gatell,Marta, AU - Rousseau,Diederik P L, AU - Du Laing,Gijs, AU - Garfí,Marianna, AU - Puigagut,Jaume, Y1 - 2018/10/18/ PY - 2018/05/01/received PY - 2018/07/24/revised PY - 2018/10/16/accepted PY - 2018/12/28/entrez PY - 2018/12/28/pubmed PY - 2019/2/12/medline KW - Bacterial activity KW - Constructed wetlands KW - Hydraulic regime KW - Microbial fuel cells KW - Organic loading rate KW - Urban wastewater SP - 1195 EP - 1208 JF - The Science of the total environment JO - Sci Total Environ VL - 652 N2 - Microbial fuel cells implemented in constructed wetlands (CW-MFCs), albeit a relatively new technology still under study, have shown to improve treatment efficiency of urban wastewater. So far the vast majority of CW-MFC systems investigated were designed as lab-scale systems working under rather unrealistic hydraulic conditions using synthetic wastewater. The main objective of this work was to quantify CW-MFCs performance operated under different conditions in a more realistic setup using meso-scale systems with horizontal flow fed with real urban wastewater. Operational conditions tested were organic loading rate (4.9 ± 1.6, 6.7 ± 1.4 and 13.6 ± 3.2 g COD/m2·day) and hydraulic regime (continuous vs. intermittent feeding) as well as different electrical connections: CW control (conventional CW without electrodes), open-circuit CW-MFC (external circuit between anode and cathode not connected) and closed-circuit CW-MFC (external circuit connected). Eight horizontal subsurface flow CWs were operated for about four months. Each wetland consisted of a PVC reservoir of 0.193 m2 filled with 4/8 mm granitic riverine gravel (wetted depth 25 cm). All wetlands had intermediate sampling points for gravel and interstitial liquid sampling. The CW-MFCs were designed as three MFCs incorporated one after the other along the flow path of the CWs. Anodes consisted of gravel with an incorporated current collector (stainless steel mesh) and the cathode consisted of a graphite felt layer. Electrodes of closed-circuit CW-MFC systems were connected externally over a 220 Ω resistance. Results showed no significant differences between tested organic loading rates, hydraulic regimes or electrical connections, however, on average, systems operated in closed-circuit CW-MFC mode under continuous flow outperformed the other experimental conditions. Closed-circuit CW-MFC compared to conventional CW control systems showed around 5% and 22% higher COD and ammonium removal, respectively. Correspondingly, overall bacteria activity, as measured by the fluorescein diacetate technique, was higher (4% to 34%) in closed-circuit systems when compared to CW control systems. SN - 1879-1026 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30586806/Contaminants_removal_and_bacterial_activity_enhancement_along_the_flow_path_of_constructed_wetland_microbial_fuel_cells_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0048-9697(18)34130-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -