Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Intimate partner violence and late entry into antenatal care in Ethiopia.
Women Birth. 2019 Dec; 32(6):e530-e537.WB

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Utilization of maternal health care services and timely initiation of antenatal care (ANC) positively influence pregnancy outcomes. The prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy is very high in Ethiopia, but we have limited knowledge on the link between IPV and initiation of ANC.

AIM

To determine the association between IPV and late entry into ANC.

METHODS

A cross sectional study was conducted among pregnant women attending ANC at the governmental health institutions. A total of 720 pregnant women were interviewed by five trained nurses or midwives, using standardized and pretested questionnaire. Descriptive, bivariate and multivariate logistic regression and parity-stratified analyses were employed.

FINDINGS

Over half of the pregnant women (51.8%; 95% CI=48.1, 55.5) entered ANC late (>16 weeks). Controlling for demographic, behavioural and reproductive health related variables, among multiparous women, any lifetime emotional or physical abuse was associated with late ANC [Adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=2.28; 95%CI=1.18, 4.39]. However, reporting recent experience of partner sexual violence was associated with late ANC in the full sample (AOR=1.55; 95%CI=1.09, 2.19).

CONCLUSION

The proportion of pregnant women entering ANC late is high in Ethiopia and associated with prior and recent experience of IPV in the current pregnancy, especially among multiparous women. Efforts for preventing IPV in pregnancy are needed to ensure that all pregnant women initiate ANC early in pregnancy. Aims of improving the health sector responses should include training health care workers on IPV that could facilitate ongoing screening, awareness creation, and women's social support networks.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Health Sciences, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia; Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: bosenatebeje@yahoo.co.uk.Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Department of Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences, Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, U.S.Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St. Olav's Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30595351

Citation

Gashaw, Bosena Tebeje, et al. "Intimate Partner Violence and Late Entry Into Antenatal Care in Ethiopia." Women and Birth : Journal of the Australian College of Midwives, vol. 32, no. 6, 2019, pp. e530-e537.
Gashaw BT, Magnus JH, Schei B. Intimate partner violence and late entry into antenatal care in Ethiopia. Women Birth. 2019;32(6):e530-e537.
Gashaw, B. T., Magnus, J. H., & Schei, B. (2019). Intimate partner violence and late entry into antenatal care in Ethiopia. Women and Birth : Journal of the Australian College of Midwives, 32(6), e530-e537. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wombi.2018.12.008
Gashaw BT, Magnus JH, Schei B. Intimate Partner Violence and Late Entry Into Antenatal Care in Ethiopia. Women Birth. 2019;32(6):e530-e537. PubMed PMID: 30595351.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intimate partner violence and late entry into antenatal care in Ethiopia. AU - Gashaw,Bosena Tebeje, AU - Magnus,Jeanette H, AU - Schei,Berit, Y1 - 2018/12/27/ PY - 2018/07/09/received PY - 2018/12/14/revised PY - 2018/12/14/accepted PY - 2019/1/1/pubmed PY - 2020/2/1/medline PY - 2019/1/1/entrez KW - Antenatal care KW - Ethiopia KW - Intimate partner violence KW - Late antenatal care KW - Parity SP - e530 EP - e537 JF - Women and birth : journal of the Australian College of Midwives JO - Women Birth VL - 32 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Utilization of maternal health care services and timely initiation of antenatal care (ANC) positively influence pregnancy outcomes. The prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy is very high in Ethiopia, but we have limited knowledge on the link between IPV and initiation of ANC. AIM: To determine the association between IPV and late entry into ANC. METHODS: A cross sectional study was conducted among pregnant women attending ANC at the governmental health institutions. A total of 720 pregnant women were interviewed by five trained nurses or midwives, using standardized and pretested questionnaire. Descriptive, bivariate and multivariate logistic regression and parity-stratified analyses were employed. FINDINGS: Over half of the pregnant women (51.8%; 95% CI=48.1, 55.5) entered ANC late (>16 weeks). Controlling for demographic, behavioural and reproductive health related variables, among multiparous women, any lifetime emotional or physical abuse was associated with late ANC [Adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=2.28; 95%CI=1.18, 4.39]. However, reporting recent experience of partner sexual violence was associated with late ANC in the full sample (AOR=1.55; 95%CI=1.09, 2.19). CONCLUSION: The proportion of pregnant women entering ANC late is high in Ethiopia and associated with prior and recent experience of IPV in the current pregnancy, especially among multiparous women. Efforts for preventing IPV in pregnancy are needed to ensure that all pregnant women initiate ANC early in pregnancy. Aims of improving the health sector responses should include training health care workers on IPV that could facilitate ongoing screening, awareness creation, and women's social support networks. SN - 1878-1799 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30595351/Intimate_partner_violence_and_late_entry_into_antenatal_care_in_Ethiopia_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1871-5192(18)30368-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -