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Evaluation of the effect of antenatal betamethasone on neonatal respiratory morbidities in late preterm deliveries (34-37 weeks).
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2020 Aug; 33(15):2533-2540.JM

Abstract

Background:

Since late preterm neonates (34-36 weeks) are more at risk of respiratory morbidities, the present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of antenatal betamethasone on neonatal respiratory morbidities in women with late preterm delivery.

Methods:

This randomized clinical trial was performed on 240 women with single pregnancy that was at high risk of late preterm delivery (34-37 weeks). The patients were randomly assigned to either betamethasone (intramuscular injection of 12 mg of betamethasone in two doses with an interval of 24 hours) or the control group. The two groups were compared with each other in terms of respiratory morbidities, NICU admission and its cause and duration, hospitalization in the neonatal ward for more than 6 hours, and the duration of hospitalization.

Results:

Of all, 79 neonates (33%) had one or more respiratory morbidities. The observed morbidities in the betamethasone group were significantly less prevalent than those in the control group (19 neonates (16%) and 60 neonates (50%), respectively, p < .001). The most frequently observed respiratory morbidity was needed for oxygen for more than an hour (34 infants, 14%). The need for oxygen for more than an hour, the need for continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), and the need for surfactant were significantly less observed in betamethasone group than in the control group. A total of 43 neonates (18%) were admitted to NICU and then hospitalized in the neonatal ward; the number of admitted neonates were significantly lower in the betamethasone group than in the control group (11 neonates (9%) and 32 neonates (27%), respectively, p < .001). Moreover, 15 neonates (6%) were admitted to the neonatal ward and there were no significant differences between the betamethasone and control groups (10 neonates (8%) and 5 neonates (4%), respectively, p = .182). Totally, 58 neonates (24%) were hospitalized; the number of hospitalized neonates was significantly lower in the betamethasone group than in the control group (21 neonates (18%) and 37 neonates (31%), respectively, p = .016).

Conclusion:

The results of this study showed that the antenatal administration of betamethasone in late preterm delivery (34-37 weeks) can improve respiratory morbidities and decrease the frequency of NICU admission.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Perinatology, Mahdieh Hospital, Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.Department of Perinatology, Mahdieh Hospital, Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.Department of Infertility, Mahdieh Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.Department of Community Medicine, School of Medicine, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran. Non-Communicable Diseases Research Center, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30612482

Citation

Mirzamoradi, Masoumeh, et al. "Evaluation of the Effect of Antenatal Betamethasone On Neonatal Respiratory Morbidities in Late Preterm Deliveries (34-37 Weeks)." The Journal of Maternal-fetal & Neonatal Medicine : the Official Journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians, vol. 33, no. 15, 2020, pp. 2533-2540.
Mirzamoradi M, Hasani Nejhad F, Jamali R, et al. Evaluation of the effect of antenatal betamethasone on neonatal respiratory morbidities in late preterm deliveries (34-37 weeks). J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2020;33(15):2533-2540.
Mirzamoradi, M., Hasani Nejhad, F., Jamali, R., Heidar, Z., & Bakhtiyari, M. (2020). Evaluation of the effect of antenatal betamethasone on neonatal respiratory morbidities in late preterm deliveries (34-37 weeks). The Journal of Maternal-fetal & Neonatal Medicine : the Official Journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians, 33(15), 2533-2540. https://doi.org/10.1080/14767058.2018.1554051
Mirzamoradi M, et al. Evaluation of the Effect of Antenatal Betamethasone On Neonatal Respiratory Morbidities in Late Preterm Deliveries (34-37 Weeks). J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2020;33(15):2533-2540. PubMed PMID: 30612482.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluation of the effect of antenatal betamethasone on neonatal respiratory morbidities in late preterm deliveries (34-37 weeks). AU - Mirzamoradi,Masoumeh, AU - Hasani Nejhad,Fatemeh, AU - Jamali,Razyeh, AU - Heidar,Zahra, AU - Bakhtiyari,Mahmood, Y1 - 2019/01/07/ PY - 2019/1/8/pubmed PY - 2019/1/8/medline PY - 2019/1/8/entrez KW - Betamethasone KW - NICU admission KW - late preterm delivery KW - neonatal respiratory morbidities SP - 2533 EP - 2540 JF - The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians JO - J. Matern. Fetal. Neonatal. Med. VL - 33 IS - 15 N2 - Background: Since late preterm neonates (34-36 weeks) are more at risk of respiratory morbidities, the present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of antenatal betamethasone on neonatal respiratory morbidities in women with late preterm delivery.Methods: This randomized clinical trial was performed on 240 women with single pregnancy that was at high risk of late preterm delivery (34-37 weeks). The patients were randomly assigned to either betamethasone (intramuscular injection of 12 mg of betamethasone in two doses with an interval of 24 hours) or the control group. The two groups were compared with each other in terms of respiratory morbidities, NICU admission and its cause and duration, hospitalization in the neonatal ward for more than 6 hours, and the duration of hospitalization.Results: Of all, 79 neonates (33%) had one or more respiratory morbidities. The observed morbidities in the betamethasone group were significantly less prevalent than those in the control group (19 neonates (16%) and 60 neonates (50%), respectively, p < .001). The most frequently observed respiratory morbidity was needed for oxygen for more than an hour (34 infants, 14%). The need for oxygen for more than an hour, the need for continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), and the need for surfactant were significantly less observed in betamethasone group than in the control group. A total of 43 neonates (18%) were admitted to NICU and then hospitalized in the neonatal ward; the number of admitted neonates were significantly lower in the betamethasone group than in the control group (11 neonates (9%) and 32 neonates (27%), respectively, p < .001). Moreover, 15 neonates (6%) were admitted to the neonatal ward and there were no significant differences between the betamethasone and control groups (10 neonates (8%) and 5 neonates (4%), respectively, p = .182). Totally, 58 neonates (24%) were hospitalized; the number of hospitalized neonates was significantly lower in the betamethasone group than in the control group (21 neonates (18%) and 37 neonates (31%), respectively, p = .016).Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the antenatal administration of betamethasone in late preterm delivery (34-37 weeks) can improve respiratory morbidities and decrease the frequency of NICU admission. SN - 1476-4954 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30612482/Evaluation_of_the_effect_of_antenatal_betamethasone_on_neonatal_respiratory_morbidities_in_late_preterm_deliveries__34_37_weeks__ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14767058.2018.1554051 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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