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Health risks to local residents from the exposure of heavy metals around the largest copper smelter in China.
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2019 Apr 30; 171:329-336.EE

Abstract

Non-ferrous smelting releases lots of heavy metals to the environment. Although numerous studies have focused on pollution in the environment, fewer have studied the adverse health effects. In the current study, samples of food, hair and urine were collected and analyzed for zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb) and copper (Cu) from residents of 3 villages near the largest copper smelter in China. The estimated daily intake (EDI), target hazard quotient (THQ), and Hazard Index (HI) were used to estimate and analyze the health risks to local residents (children, adults, and seniors). The Zn, Cr, Ni, Fe, Pb and Cu concentrations in food ranged from 16.02 to 61.48 mg kg-1, 0.23-13.64 mg kg-1, 0.10-5.90 mg kg-1, 19.16-170.05 mg kg-1, 0.15-3.62 mg kg-1, and 0.53-2.74 mg kg-1, respectively. Zn, Cr, Ni and Pb concentrations in all vegetables were above the national tolerance limits. Children had higher EDIs of heavy metals than that of adults and seniors. The THQ of single elements and the HI of combined elements indicated that the EDI of Pb and Cu showed the highest potential health risks, followed by the EDI of Zn and Fe, and Ni, Cr. High EDI of heavy metals resulted in much higher concentrations of heavy metals in hair and urine samples than those of normal Chinese residents, showing that residents around the smelter have potential health risks through daily food intake. The main sources of these heavy metals were from the consumption of rice and vegetables and it is imperative that measures should be taken to control this urgent problem.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China; National Engineering and Technology Research Center for Red Soil Improvement, Red Soil Ecological Experiment Station, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yingtan 335211, China.Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China; College of Resource and Environment, Anhui Science and Technology University, Fengyang, Anhui 233100, China; National Engineering and Technology Research Center for Red Soil Improvement, Red Soil Ecological Experiment Station, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yingtan 335211, China. Electronic address: zhoujun@issas.ac.cn.Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection, No. 8 Jiang-wang-miao Street, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210042, China.Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China; National Engineering and Technology Research Center for Red Soil Improvement, Red Soil Ecological Experiment Station, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yingtan 335211, China.Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China; National Engineering and Technology Research Center for Red Soil Improvement, Red Soil Ecological Experiment Station, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yingtan 335211, China.Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China; National Engineering and Technology Research Center for Red Soil Improvement, Red Soil Ecological Experiment Station, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yingtan 335211, China.Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China; National Engineering and Technology Research Center for Red Soil Improvement, Red Soil Ecological Experiment Station, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yingtan 335211, China.Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China; National Engineering and Technology Research Center for Red Soil Improvement, Red Soil Ecological Experiment Station, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yingtan 335211, China.Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China; National Engineering and Technology Research Center for Red Soil Improvement, Red Soil Ecological Experiment Station, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yingtan 335211, China; Jiangxi Engineering Research Center of Eco-Remediation of Heavy Metal Pollution, Jiangxi Academy of Science, Nanchang 330096, China. Electronic address: zhoujing@issas.ac.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30616149

Citation

Hu, Yuanmei, et al. "Health Risks to Local Residents From the Exposure of Heavy Metals Around the Largest Copper Smelter in China." Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, vol. 171, 2019, pp. 329-336.
Hu Y, Zhou J, Du B, et al. Health risks to local residents from the exposure of heavy metals around the largest copper smelter in China. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2019;171:329-336.
Hu, Y., Zhou, J., Du, B., Liu, H., Zhang, W., Liang, J., Zhang, W., You, L., & Zhou, J. (2019). Health risks to local residents from the exposure of heavy metals around the largest copper smelter in China. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 171, 329-336. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoenv.2018.12.073
Hu Y, et al. Health Risks to Local Residents From the Exposure of Heavy Metals Around the Largest Copper Smelter in China. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2019 Apr 30;171:329-336. PubMed PMID: 30616149.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Health risks to local residents from the exposure of heavy metals around the largest copper smelter in China. AU - Hu,Yuanmei, AU - Zhou,Jun, AU - Du,Buyun, AU - Liu,Hailong, AU - Zhang,Wantong, AU - Liang,Jiani, AU - Zhang,Wenhui, AU - You,Laiyong, AU - Zhou,Jing, Y1 - 2019/01/04/ PY - 2018/09/05/received PY - 2018/12/19/revised PY - 2018/12/23/accepted PY - 2019/1/8/pubmed PY - 2019/3/19/medline PY - 2019/1/8/entrez KW - Foodstuffs KW - Hair KW - Hazard index KW - Target hazard quotient KW - Urine SP - 329 EP - 336 JF - Ecotoxicology and environmental safety JO - Ecotoxicol Environ Saf VL - 171 N2 - Non-ferrous smelting releases lots of heavy metals to the environment. Although numerous studies have focused on pollution in the environment, fewer have studied the adverse health effects. In the current study, samples of food, hair and urine were collected and analyzed for zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb) and copper (Cu) from residents of 3 villages near the largest copper smelter in China. The estimated daily intake (EDI), target hazard quotient (THQ), and Hazard Index (HI) were used to estimate and analyze the health risks to local residents (children, adults, and seniors). The Zn, Cr, Ni, Fe, Pb and Cu concentrations in food ranged from 16.02 to 61.48 mg kg-1, 0.23-13.64 mg kg-1, 0.10-5.90 mg kg-1, 19.16-170.05 mg kg-1, 0.15-3.62 mg kg-1, and 0.53-2.74 mg kg-1, respectively. Zn, Cr, Ni and Pb concentrations in all vegetables were above the national tolerance limits. Children had higher EDIs of heavy metals than that of adults and seniors. The THQ of single elements and the HI of combined elements indicated that the EDI of Pb and Cu showed the highest potential health risks, followed by the EDI of Zn and Fe, and Ni, Cr. High EDI of heavy metals resulted in much higher concentrations of heavy metals in hair and urine samples than those of normal Chinese residents, showing that residents around the smelter have potential health risks through daily food intake. The main sources of these heavy metals were from the consumption of rice and vegetables and it is imperative that measures should be taken to control this urgent problem. SN - 1090-2414 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30616149/Health_risks_to_local_residents_from_the_exposure_of_heavy_metals_around_the_largest_copper_smelter_in_China_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0147-6513(18)31371-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -