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BMP-dependent, injury-induced stem cell niche as a mechanism of heterotopic ossification.
Stem Cell Res Ther. 2019 01 11; 10(1):14.SC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Heterotopic ossification (HO), either acquired (aHO) or hereditary, such as fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), is a serious condition without effective treatment. Understanding of the core process of injury-induced HO is still severely limited.

METHODS

Double-pulse thymidine analog labeling was used to explore the distinctive domains evolved in injury-induced lesions in an animal model of HO (Nse-BMP4). Histological studies were performed to see whether a similar zonal pattern is also consistently found in biopsies from patients with aHO and FOP. In vivo clonal analysis with Rainbow mice, genetic loss-of-function studies with diphtheria toxin A (DTA)-mediated depletion and lineage tracing with Zsgreen reporter mice were used to obtain further evidence that Tie2-cre-, Gli1-creERT-, and Glast-creERT-labeled cells contribute to HO as niche-dwelling progenitor/stem cells. Immunohistochemistry was used to test whether vasculature, neurites, macrophages, and mast cells are closely associated with the proposed niche and thus are possible candidate niche supportive cells. Similar methods also were employed to further understand the signaling pathways that regulate the niche and the resultant HO.

RESULTS

We found that distinctive domains evolved in injury-induced lesions, including, from outside-in, a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) niche, a transient domain and an inner differentiated core in an animal model of HO (Nse-BMP4). A similar zonal structure was found in patients with aHO and FOP. In vivo clonal analysis with Rainbow mice and genetic loss-of-function studies with DTA provided evidence that Tie2-cre-, Gli1-creERT-, and Glast-creERT-labeled cells contribute to HO as niche-dwelling progenitor/stem cells; consistently, vasculature, neurites, macrophages, and mast cells are closely associated with the proposed niche and thus are possible candidate niche supportive cells. Further mechanistic study found that BMP and hedgehog (Hh) signaling co-regulate the niche and the resultant HO.

CONCLUSIONS

Available data provide evidence of a potential core mechanism in which multiple disease-specific cellular and extracellular molecular elements form a unique local microenvironment, i.e., an injury-induced stem cell niche, which regulates the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The implication for HO is that therapeutic approaches must consider several different disease specific factors as parts of a functional unit, instead of treating one factor at a time.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Basic Medical Sciences, Anhui Medical University, 81 Meishan road, Hefei, 230032, China.School of Basic Medical Sciences, Anhui Medical University, 81 Meishan road, Hefei, 230032, China.Department of Traumatic Orthopedics, Anhui Provincial Hospital, The first Affiliated Hospital of China University of Science and Technology, Hefei, 233000, China.School of Basic Medical Sciences, Anhui Medical University, 81 Meishan road, Hefei, 230032, China.Department of Neurology, Northwestern University, Ward Building 10-233, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60611-3008, USA.School of Basic Medical Sciences, Anhui Medical University, 81 Meishan road, Hefei, 230032, China.Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.Center for Comparative Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg Medical School, Chicago, IL, 60611-3008, USA.Department of Neurology, Northwestern University, Ward Building 10-233, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60611-3008, USA.School of Basic Medical Sciences, Anhui Medical University, 81 Meishan road, Hefei, 230032, China. l-kan@northwestern.edu. Department of Neurology, Northwestern University, Ward Building 10-233, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60611-3008, USA. l-kan@northwestern.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30635039

Citation

Kan, Chen, et al. "BMP-dependent, Injury-induced Stem Cell Niche as a Mechanism of Heterotopic Ossification." Stem Cell Research & Therapy, vol. 10, no. 1, 2019, p. 14.
Kan C, Ding N, Yang J, et al. BMP-dependent, injury-induced stem cell niche as a mechanism of heterotopic ossification. Stem Cell Res Ther. 2019;10(1):14.
Kan, C., Ding, N., Yang, J., Tan, Z., McGuire, T. L., Lu, H., Zhang, K., Berger, D. M. P., Kessler, J. A., & Kan, L. (2019). BMP-dependent, injury-induced stem cell niche as a mechanism of heterotopic ossification. Stem Cell Research & Therapy, 10(1), 14. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13287-018-1107-7
Kan C, et al. BMP-dependent, Injury-induced Stem Cell Niche as a Mechanism of Heterotopic Ossification. Stem Cell Res Ther. 2019 01 11;10(1):14. PubMed PMID: 30635039.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - BMP-dependent, injury-induced stem cell niche as a mechanism of heterotopic ossification. AU - Kan,Chen, AU - Ding,Na, AU - Yang,Jiazhao, AU - Tan,Zhenya, AU - McGuire,Tammy L, AU - Lu,Haimei, AU - Zhang,Keqin, AU - Berger,Diana M Palila, AU - Kessler,John A, AU - Kan,Lixin, Y1 - 2019/01/11/ PY - 2018/08/22/received PY - 2018/12/12/accepted PY - 2018/11/28/revised PY - 2019/1/13/entrez PY - 2019/1/13/pubmed PY - 2020/3/14/medline KW - Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) KW - Hedgehog (Hh) KW - Heterotopic ossification (HO) KW - Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) KW - Niche KW - Niche supportive cells KW - Niche supportive molecules SP - 14 EP - 14 JF - Stem cell research & therapy JO - Stem Cell Res Ther VL - 10 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Heterotopic ossification (HO), either acquired (aHO) or hereditary, such as fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), is a serious condition without effective treatment. Understanding of the core process of injury-induced HO is still severely limited. METHODS: Double-pulse thymidine analog labeling was used to explore the distinctive domains evolved in injury-induced lesions in an animal model of HO (Nse-BMP4). Histological studies were performed to see whether a similar zonal pattern is also consistently found in biopsies from patients with aHO and FOP. In vivo clonal analysis with Rainbow mice, genetic loss-of-function studies with diphtheria toxin A (DTA)-mediated depletion and lineage tracing with Zsgreen reporter mice were used to obtain further evidence that Tie2-cre-, Gli1-creERT-, and Glast-creERT-labeled cells contribute to HO as niche-dwelling progenitor/stem cells. Immunohistochemistry was used to test whether vasculature, neurites, macrophages, and mast cells are closely associated with the proposed niche and thus are possible candidate niche supportive cells. Similar methods also were employed to further understand the signaling pathways that regulate the niche and the resultant HO. RESULTS: We found that distinctive domains evolved in injury-induced lesions, including, from outside-in, a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) niche, a transient domain and an inner differentiated core in an animal model of HO (Nse-BMP4). A similar zonal structure was found in patients with aHO and FOP. In vivo clonal analysis with Rainbow mice and genetic loss-of-function studies with DTA provided evidence that Tie2-cre-, Gli1-creERT-, and Glast-creERT-labeled cells contribute to HO as niche-dwelling progenitor/stem cells; consistently, vasculature, neurites, macrophages, and mast cells are closely associated with the proposed niche and thus are possible candidate niche supportive cells. Further mechanistic study found that BMP and hedgehog (Hh) signaling co-regulate the niche and the resultant HO. CONCLUSIONS: Available data provide evidence of a potential core mechanism in which multiple disease-specific cellular and extracellular molecular elements form a unique local microenvironment, i.e., an injury-induced stem cell niche, which regulates the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The implication for HO is that therapeutic approaches must consider several different disease specific factors as parts of a functional unit, instead of treating one factor at a time. SN - 1757-6512 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30635039/BMP_dependent_injury_induced_stem_cell_niche_as_a_mechanism_of_heterotopic_ossification_ L2 - https://stemcellres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13287-018-1107-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -