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Severity of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Drug Use Disorders Among Sexual Minority Individuals and Their "Not Sure" Counterparts.
LGBT Health. 2019 Jan; 6(1):15-22.LH

Abstract

PURPOSE

Sexual minority individuals have heightened risk for substance use; however, previous studies have not assessed severity of alcohol use disorders (AUDs), tobacco use disorders (TUDs), and drug use disorders (DUDs) among lesbian/gay and bisexual individuals and those "not sure" of their sexual identity compared with heterosexual individuals. This study examined how three dimensions of sexual orientation (identity, attraction, and behavior) relate to severity of AUD, TUD, and DUD.

METHODS

This study used cross-sectional national data (N = 36,309) from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III, and well-validated alcohol, tobacco, and drug measures that align with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition criteria. Data were collected through in-person interviews in 2012-2013.

RESULTS

Sexual minority respondents, based on sexual identity, had higher odds of severe AUD or TUD than heterosexual respondents. Opposite- and same-sex behavior was a predictor of severe AUD (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.24-4.79) and TUD (AOR = 2.16; 95% CI = 1.19-3.93), but not DUD. Those "not sure" of their sexual identity had higher odds of severe AUD, TUD, and DUD: AUD (AOR = 5.05; 95% CI = 2.78-9.16), TUD (AOR = 4.18; 95% CI = 2.29-7.64), and DUD (AOR = 4.40; 95% CI = 1.72-11.2), than heterosexual respondents. There were few significant differences between "not sure" and bisexual respondents.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings provide strong evidence that bisexual and "not sure" U.S. adults are more likely to have a severe AUD and TUD. They also demonstrate the importance of treatment strategies that address sexual minority-specific risks, particularly for bisexual individuals and those "not sure" of their sexual identity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Center for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol, Smoking and Health, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 2 Institute for Research on Women and Gender, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 3 Department of Psychiatry, Addiction Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.1 Center for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol, Smoking and Health, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 2 Institute for Research on Women and Gender, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.4 Center for Sexuality and Health Disparities, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.5 School of Nursing and Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, New York.1 Center for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol, Smoking and Health, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 2 Institute for Research on Women and Gender, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30638419

Citation

Boyd, Carol J., et al. "Severity of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Drug Use Disorders Among Sexual Minority Individuals and Their "Not Sure" Counterparts." LGBT Health, vol. 6, no. 1, 2019, pp. 15-22.
Boyd CJ, Veliz PT, Stephenson R, et al. Severity of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Drug Use Disorders Among Sexual Minority Individuals and Their "Not Sure" Counterparts. LGBT Health. 2019;6(1):15-22.
Boyd, C. J., Veliz, P. T., Stephenson, R., Hughes, T. L., & McCabe, S. E. (2019). Severity of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Drug Use Disorders Among Sexual Minority Individuals and Their "Not Sure" Counterparts. LGBT Health, 6(1), 15-22. https://doi.org/10.1089/lgbt.2018.0122
Boyd CJ, et al. Severity of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Drug Use Disorders Among Sexual Minority Individuals and Their "Not Sure" Counterparts. LGBT Health. 2019;6(1):15-22. PubMed PMID: 30638419.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Severity of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Drug Use Disorders Among Sexual Minority Individuals and Their "Not Sure" Counterparts. AU - Boyd,Carol J, AU - Veliz,Philip T, AU - Stephenson,Rob, AU - Hughes,Tonda L, AU - McCabe,Sean Esteban, Y1 - 2019/01/14/ PY - 2019/1/15/pubmed PY - 2019/4/19/medline PY - 2019/1/15/entrez KW - DSM-5 disorders KW - alcohol use KW - dimensions of sexual orientation KW - drug use KW - sexual orientation KW - tobacco use SP - 15 EP - 22 JF - LGBT health JO - LGBT Health VL - 6 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: Sexual minority individuals have heightened risk for substance use; however, previous studies have not assessed severity of alcohol use disorders (AUDs), tobacco use disorders (TUDs), and drug use disorders (DUDs) among lesbian/gay and bisexual individuals and those "not sure" of their sexual identity compared with heterosexual individuals. This study examined how three dimensions of sexual orientation (identity, attraction, and behavior) relate to severity of AUD, TUD, and DUD. METHODS: This study used cross-sectional national data (N = 36,309) from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III, and well-validated alcohol, tobacco, and drug measures that align with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition criteria. Data were collected through in-person interviews in 2012-2013. RESULTS: Sexual minority respondents, based on sexual identity, had higher odds of severe AUD or TUD than heterosexual respondents. Opposite- and same-sex behavior was a predictor of severe AUD (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.24-4.79) and TUD (AOR = 2.16; 95% CI = 1.19-3.93), but not DUD. Those "not sure" of their sexual identity had higher odds of severe AUD, TUD, and DUD: AUD (AOR = 5.05; 95% CI = 2.78-9.16), TUD (AOR = 4.18; 95% CI = 2.29-7.64), and DUD (AOR = 4.40; 95% CI = 1.72-11.2), than heterosexual respondents. There were few significant differences between "not sure" and bisexual respondents. CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide strong evidence that bisexual and "not sure" U.S. adults are more likely to have a severe AUD and TUD. They also demonstrate the importance of treatment strategies that address sexual minority-specific risks, particularly for bisexual individuals and those "not sure" of their sexual identity. SN - 2325-8306 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30638419/Severity_of_Alcohol_Tobacco_and_Drug_Use_Disorders_Among_Sexual_Minority_Individuals_and_Their_"Not_Sure"_Counterparts_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/lgbt.2018.0122?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -