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Degradation of iopamidol by three UV-based oxidation processes: Kinetics, pathways, and formation of iodinated disinfection byproducts.
Chemosphere. 2019 Apr; 221:270-277.C

Abstract

In this study, the degradation kinetics of iopamidol (IPM) by three different UV-based oxidation processes including UV/hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), UV/persulfate (PDS) and UV/chlorine (NaClO) were examined and the potential formation of iodinated disinfection byproducts (I-DBPs) in these processes followed by sequential chlorination was comparatively investigated. Increasing pH led to the decrease of IPM degradation rate in UV/NaClO, while it showed negligible impact in UV/PDS and UV/H2O2. Common background constituents such as chloride ions (Cl-), carbonate (HCO3-) and natural organic matter (NOM) inhibited IPM degradation in UV/H2O2 and UV/PDS, while IPM degradation in UV/NaClO was only suppressed by NOM but not Cl- and HCO3-. The differences in transformation products of IPM treated by hydroxyl radical (HO*), sulfate radical (SO4*-), as well as Cl2*- and ClO* generated in these processes, respectively, were also analyzed. The results suggested that hydroxyl radical (HO*) preferred to form hydroxylated derivatives. Sulfate radical (SO4*-) preferred to oxidize amino group of IPM to nitro group, while Cl2*- and ClO* favored the generation of chlorine-containing products. Moreover, specific I-DBPs (i.e., iodoform (IF) and monoiodacetic acid (MIAA)) were detected in the three processes followed by chlorination. The addition of NOM had little effect on IF formation of three processes, while MIAA formation decreased in all processes except UV/H2O2. Given that the formation of I-DBPs in UV/NaClO was less than those formed in the other two processes, UV/NaClO seems to be a more promising strategy for effectively removing IPM with alleviation of I-DBPs in treated water effluents.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150090, China.State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150090, China; Institute of Environmental and Ecological Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510006, China. Electronic address: jiangjinhit@126.com.Key Laboratory of Songliao Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Jilin Jianzhu University, Changchun, 130118, China.State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150090, China.State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150090, China.State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150090, China.State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150090, China.School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Shandong Jianzhu University, Jinan, 250010, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30640010

Citation

Zhao, Xi, et al. "Degradation of Iopamidol By Three UV-based Oxidation Processes: Kinetics, Pathways, and Formation of Iodinated Disinfection Byproducts." Chemosphere, vol. 221, 2019, pp. 270-277.
Zhao X, Jiang J, Pang S, et al. Degradation of iopamidol by three UV-based oxidation processes: Kinetics, pathways, and formation of iodinated disinfection byproducts. Chemosphere. 2019;221:270-277.
Zhao, X., Jiang, J., Pang, S., Guan, C., Li, J., Wang, Z., Ma, J., & Luo, C. (2019). Degradation of iopamidol by three UV-based oxidation processes: Kinetics, pathways, and formation of iodinated disinfection byproducts. Chemosphere, 221, 270-277. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.12.162
Zhao X, et al. Degradation of Iopamidol By Three UV-based Oxidation Processes: Kinetics, Pathways, and Formation of Iodinated Disinfection Byproducts. Chemosphere. 2019;221:270-277. PubMed PMID: 30640010.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Degradation of iopamidol by three UV-based oxidation processes: Kinetics, pathways, and formation of iodinated disinfection byproducts. AU - Zhao,Xi, AU - Jiang,Jin, AU - Pang,Suyan, AU - Guan,Chaoting, AU - Li,Juan, AU - Wang,Zhen, AU - Ma,Jun, AU - Luo,Congwei, Y1 - 2018/12/23/ PY - 2018/09/08/received PY - 2018/12/14/revised PY - 2018/12/21/accepted PY - 2019/1/15/pubmed PY - 2019/3/21/medline PY - 2019/1/15/entrez KW - Iodinated disinfection by-products KW - Iopamidol KW - Transformation products KW - UV-based oxidation processes SP - 270 EP - 277 JF - Chemosphere JO - Chemosphere VL - 221 N2 - In this study, the degradation kinetics of iopamidol (IPM) by three different UV-based oxidation processes including UV/hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), UV/persulfate (PDS) and UV/chlorine (NaClO) were examined and the potential formation of iodinated disinfection byproducts (I-DBPs) in these processes followed by sequential chlorination was comparatively investigated. Increasing pH led to the decrease of IPM degradation rate in UV/NaClO, while it showed negligible impact in UV/PDS and UV/H2O2. Common background constituents such as chloride ions (Cl-), carbonate (HCO3-) and natural organic matter (NOM) inhibited IPM degradation in UV/H2O2 and UV/PDS, while IPM degradation in UV/NaClO was only suppressed by NOM but not Cl- and HCO3-. The differences in transformation products of IPM treated by hydroxyl radical (HO*), sulfate radical (SO4*-), as well as Cl2*- and ClO* generated in these processes, respectively, were also analyzed. The results suggested that hydroxyl radical (HO*) preferred to form hydroxylated derivatives. Sulfate radical (SO4*-) preferred to oxidize amino group of IPM to nitro group, while Cl2*- and ClO* favored the generation of chlorine-containing products. Moreover, specific I-DBPs (i.e., iodoform (IF) and monoiodacetic acid (MIAA)) were detected in the three processes followed by chlorination. The addition of NOM had little effect on IF formation of three processes, while MIAA formation decreased in all processes except UV/H2O2. Given that the formation of I-DBPs in UV/NaClO was less than those formed in the other two processes, UV/NaClO seems to be a more promising strategy for effectively removing IPM with alleviation of I-DBPs in treated water effluents. SN - 1879-1298 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30640010/Degradation_of_iopamidol_by_three_UV_based_oxidation_processes:_Kinetics_pathways_and_formation_of_iodinated_disinfection_byproducts_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0045-6535(18)32503-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -