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Employment status and the association of sociocultural stress with sleep in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).
Sleep. 2019 04 01; 42(4)S

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES

We examined the association of sociocultural stress severity (i.e. acculturation stress, ethnic discrimination) and chronic stress burden with multiple dimensions of sleep in a population-based sample of US Hispanics/Latinos. We also explored whether employment status modified stress-sleep associations.

METHODS

We conducted survey linear regressions to test the cross-sectional association of sociocultural stress severity and stress burden with sleep dimensions using data collected between 2010 and 2013 from individuals who participated in both the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sueño and Sociocultural Ancillary studies (N = 1192).

RESULTS

Greater acculturation stress (B = 0.75, standard error [SE] = 0.26, p < .01) and chronic psychosocial stress burden (B = 1.04, SE = 0.18, p < .001) were associated with greater insomnia symptoms but were not associated with actigraphic measures of sleep. Ethnic discrimination was not associated with any of the sleep dimensions. The association of acculturation stress with insomnia severity was greater in unemployed (B = 2.06, SE = 0.34) compared to employed (B = 1.01, SE = 0.31) participants (p-interaction = .08).

CONCLUSIONS

Acculturation stress severity and chronic stress burden are important and consistent correlates of insomnia, but not actigraphically measured sleep dimensions. If replicated, future research should test whether interventions targeting the resolution of sociocultural stress improve sleep quality in Hispanics/Latinos.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Social Work, Columbia University, New York, NY.Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA.Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. Cambridge Health Alliance, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA.Department of Neurology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL.Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY.Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill-Gillins School of Global Public Health, Chapel Hill, NC.Department of Neurology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL.Department of Neurology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL.College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ.Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR.Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA.Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30649533

Citation

Alcántara, Carmela, et al. "Employment Status and the Association of Sociocultural Stress With Sleep in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)." Sleep, vol. 42, no. 4, 2019.
Alcántara C, Gallo LC, Wen J, et al. Employment status and the association of sociocultural stress with sleep in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). Sleep. 2019;42(4).
Alcántara, C., Gallo, L. C., Wen, J., Dudley, K. A., Wallace, D. M., Mossavar-Rahmani, Y., Sotres-Alvarez, D., Zee, P. C., Ramos, A. R., Petrov, M. E., Casement, M. D., Hall, M. H., Redline, S., & Patel, S. R. (2019). Employment status and the association of sociocultural stress with sleep in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). Sleep, 42(4). https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsz002
Alcántara C, et al. Employment Status and the Association of Sociocultural Stress With Sleep in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). Sleep. 2019 04 1;42(4) PubMed PMID: 30649533.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Employment status and the association of sociocultural stress with sleep in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). AU - Alcántara,Carmela, AU - Gallo,Linda C, AU - Wen,Jia, AU - Dudley,Katherine A, AU - Wallace,Douglas M, AU - Mossavar-Rahmani,Yasmin, AU - Sotres-Alvarez,Daniela, AU - Zee,Phyllis C, AU - Ramos,Alberto R, AU - Petrov,Megan E, AU - Casement,Melynda D, AU - Hall,Martica H, AU - Redline,Susan, AU - Patel,Sanjay R, PY - 2018/07/24/received PY - 2018/11/15/revised PY - 2019/1/17/pubmed PY - 2020/4/15/medline PY - 2019/1/17/entrez KW - Hispanic KW - actigraphy KW - employment status KW - insomnia KW - psychosocial factors KW - sleep KW - social determinants KW - sociocultural KW - stress JF - Sleep JO - Sleep VL - 42 IS - 4 N2 - STUDY OBJECTIVES: We examined the association of sociocultural stress severity (i.e. acculturation stress, ethnic discrimination) and chronic stress burden with multiple dimensions of sleep in a population-based sample of US Hispanics/Latinos. We also explored whether employment status modified stress-sleep associations. METHODS: We conducted survey linear regressions to test the cross-sectional association of sociocultural stress severity and stress burden with sleep dimensions using data collected between 2010 and 2013 from individuals who participated in both the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sueño and Sociocultural Ancillary studies (N = 1192). RESULTS: Greater acculturation stress (B = 0.75, standard error [SE] = 0.26, p < .01) and chronic psychosocial stress burden (B = 1.04, SE = 0.18, p < .001) were associated with greater insomnia symptoms but were not associated with actigraphic measures of sleep. Ethnic discrimination was not associated with any of the sleep dimensions. The association of acculturation stress with insomnia severity was greater in unemployed (B = 2.06, SE = 0.34) compared to employed (B = 1.01, SE = 0.31) participants (p-interaction = .08). CONCLUSIONS: Acculturation stress severity and chronic stress burden are important and consistent correlates of insomnia, but not actigraphically measured sleep dimensions. If replicated, future research should test whether interventions targeting the resolution of sociocultural stress improve sleep quality in Hispanics/Latinos. SN - 1550-9109 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30649533/Employment_status_and_the_association_of_sociocultural_stress_with_sleep_in_the_Hispanic_Community_Health_Study/Study_of_Latinos__HCHS/SOL__ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsz002 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -