Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Belief in conspiracy theories and intentions to engage in everyday crime.
Br J Soc Psychol 2019; 58(3):534-549BJ

Abstract

Belief in conspiracy theories is associated with negative outcomes such as political disengagement, prejudice, and environmental inaction. The current studies - one cross-sectional (N = 253) and one experimental (N = 120) - tested the hypothesis that belief in conspiracy theories would increase intentions to engage in everyday crime. Study 1 demonstrated that belief in conspiracy theories predicted everyday crime behaviours when controlling for other known predictors of everyday crime (e.g., Honesty-Humility). Study 2 demonstrated that exposure to conspiracy theories (vs. control) increased intentions to engage in everyday crime in the future, through an increased feeling of anomie. The perception that others have conspired may therefore in some contexts lead to negative action rather than inaction.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Staffordshire University, UK.University of Kent, UK.University of Kent, UK.Staffordshire University, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30659628

Citation

Jolley, Daniel, et al. "Belief in Conspiracy Theories and Intentions to Engage in Everyday Crime." The British Journal of Social Psychology, vol. 58, no. 3, 2019, pp. 534-549.
Jolley D, Douglas KM, Leite AC, et al. Belief in conspiracy theories and intentions to engage in everyday crime. Br J Soc Psychol. 2019;58(3):534-549.
Jolley, D., Douglas, K. M., Leite, A. C., & Schrader, T. (2019). Belief in conspiracy theories and intentions to engage in everyday crime. The British Journal of Social Psychology, 58(3), pp. 534-549. doi:10.1111/bjso.12311.
Jolley D, et al. Belief in Conspiracy Theories and Intentions to Engage in Everyday Crime. Br J Soc Psychol. 2019;58(3):534-549. PubMed PMID: 30659628.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Belief in conspiracy theories and intentions to engage in everyday crime. AU - Jolley,Daniel, AU - Douglas,Karen M, AU - Leite,Ana C, AU - Schrader,Tanya, Y1 - 2019/01/19/ PY - 2018/07/25/received PY - 2018/12/06/revised PY - 2019/1/20/pubmed PY - 2019/1/20/medline PY - 2019/1/20/entrez KW - anomie KW - conspiracy beliefs KW - conspiracy theories KW - everyday crime KW - unethical behaviour SP - 534 EP - 549 JF - The British journal of social psychology JO - Br J Soc Psychol VL - 58 IS - 3 N2 - Belief in conspiracy theories is associated with negative outcomes such as political disengagement, prejudice, and environmental inaction. The current studies - one cross-sectional (N = 253) and one experimental (N = 120) - tested the hypothesis that belief in conspiracy theories would increase intentions to engage in everyday crime. Study 1 demonstrated that belief in conspiracy theories predicted everyday crime behaviours when controlling for other known predictors of everyday crime (e.g., Honesty-Humility). Study 2 demonstrated that exposure to conspiracy theories (vs. control) increased intentions to engage in everyday crime in the future, through an increased feeling of anomie. The perception that others have conspired may therefore in some contexts lead to negative action rather than inaction. SN - 2044-8309 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30659628/Belief_in_conspiracy_theories_and_intentions_to_engage_in_everyday_crime L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12311 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -