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Arbovirus coinfection and co-transmission: A neglected public health concern?
PLoS Biol. 2019 01; 17(1):e3000130.PB

Abstract

Epidemiological synergy between outbreaks of viruses transmitted by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, such as chikungunya, dengue, and Zika viruses, has resulted in coinfection of humans with multiple viruses. Despite the potential impact on public health, we know only little about the occurrence and consequences of such coinfections. Here, we review the impact of coinfection on clinical disease in humans, discuss the possibility for co-transmission from mosquito to human, and describe a role for modeling transmission dynamics at various levels of co-transmission. Solving the mystery of virus coinfections will reveal whether they should be viewed as a serious concern for public health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, United States of America.Department of Biological Sciences and Eck Institute for Global Health, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana, United States of America.Department of Biological Sciences and Eck Institute for Global Health, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana, United States of America.Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, United States of America.Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30668574

Citation

Vogels, Chantal B F., et al. "Arbovirus Coinfection and Co-transmission: a Neglected Public Health Concern?" PLoS Biology, vol. 17, no. 1, 2019, pp. e3000130.
Vogels CBF, Rückert C, Cavany SM, et al. Arbovirus coinfection and co-transmission: A neglected public health concern? PLoS Biol. 2019;17(1):e3000130.
Vogels, C. B. F., Rückert, C., Cavany, S. M., Perkins, T. A., Ebel, G. D., & Grubaugh, N. D. (2019). Arbovirus coinfection and co-transmission: A neglected public health concern? PLoS Biology, 17(1), e3000130. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.3000130
Vogels CBF, et al. Arbovirus Coinfection and Co-transmission: a Neglected Public Health Concern. PLoS Biol. 2019;17(1):e3000130. PubMed PMID: 30668574.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Arbovirus coinfection and co-transmission: A neglected public health concern? AU - Vogels,Chantal B F, AU - Rückert,Claudia, AU - Cavany,Sean M, AU - Perkins,T Alex, AU - Ebel,Gregory D, AU - Grubaugh,Nathan D, Y1 - 2019/01/22/ PY - 2019/02/01/revised PY - 2019/1/23/pubmed PY - 2019/11/5/medline PY - 2019/1/23/entrez SP - e3000130 EP - e3000130 JF - PLoS biology JO - PLoS Biol VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - Epidemiological synergy between outbreaks of viruses transmitted by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, such as chikungunya, dengue, and Zika viruses, has resulted in coinfection of humans with multiple viruses. Despite the potential impact on public health, we know only little about the occurrence and consequences of such coinfections. Here, we review the impact of coinfection on clinical disease in humans, discuss the possibility for co-transmission from mosquito to human, and describe a role for modeling transmission dynamics at various levels of co-transmission. Solving the mystery of virus coinfections will reveal whether they should be viewed as a serious concern for public health. SN - 1545-7885 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30668574/Arbovirus_coinfection_and_co_transmission:_A_neglected_public_health_concern L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.3000130 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -