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Theories of truth and teaching clinical reasoning and problem solving.
Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2019 10; 24(4):839-848.AH

Abstract

In this paper, we will first discuss two current meta-theories dealing with different, aspects of "truth". The first metatheory conceives of truth in terms of coherence (rationality, consistency): a body of knowledge is true when it contains no inconsistencies and has at least some credibility. The second metatheory conceives of truth as correspondence, i.e., empirical accuracy. The two metatheories supplement each other, but are also incommensurable, i.e., they cannot be expressed in each other's terms, for they employ completely different criteria to establish truth (Englebretsen in Bare facts and naked truths: a new correspondence theory of truth, Routledge, London, 2005). We will discuss both the role of both metatheories in medicine, in particular in medical education in a clinical context. In line with Hammond's view (Med Decis Mak 16(3):281-287, 1996a; Human judgment and social policy: irreducible uncertainty, inevitable error, unavoidable injustice, Oxford University Press, New York, 1996b), we will extend the two metatheories to two forms of competence: coherence competence and correspondence competence, and demonstrate that distinguishing these two forms of competence increases our insights as to the best way to teach undergraduate students clinical problem solving.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Research and Development of Education, University Medical Centre Utrecht, PO Box # 85500, 3508 GA, Utrecht, The Netherlands. E.J.F.M.Custers@umcutrecht.nl.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30671703

Citation

Custers, Eugène J F M.. "Theories of Truth and Teaching Clinical Reasoning and Problem Solving." Advances in Health Sciences Education : Theory and Practice, vol. 24, no. 4, 2019, pp. 839-848.
Custers EJFM. Theories of truth and teaching clinical reasoning and problem solving. Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2019;24(4):839-848.
Custers, E. J. F. M. (2019). Theories of truth and teaching clinical reasoning and problem solving. Advances in Health Sciences Education : Theory and Practice, 24(4), 839-848. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10459-018-09871-4
Custers EJFM. Theories of Truth and Teaching Clinical Reasoning and Problem Solving. Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2019;24(4):839-848. PubMed PMID: 30671703.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Theories of truth and teaching clinical reasoning and problem solving. A1 - Custers,Eugène J F M, Y1 - 2019/01/22/ PY - 2018/07/26/received PY - 2018/12/21/accepted PY - 2019/1/24/pubmed PY - 2019/1/24/medline PY - 2019/1/24/entrez KW - Clinical reasoning KW - Diagnostic competence KW - Medical problem solving SP - 839 EP - 848 JF - Advances in health sciences education : theory and practice JO - Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract VL - 24 IS - 4 N2 - In this paper, we will first discuss two current meta-theories dealing with different, aspects of "truth". The first metatheory conceives of truth in terms of coherence (rationality, consistency): a body of knowledge is true when it contains no inconsistencies and has at least some credibility. The second metatheory conceives of truth as correspondence, i.e., empirical accuracy. The two metatheories supplement each other, but are also incommensurable, i.e., they cannot be expressed in each other's terms, for they employ completely different criteria to establish truth (Englebretsen in Bare facts and naked truths: a new correspondence theory of truth, Routledge, London, 2005). We will discuss both the role of both metatheories in medicine, in particular in medical education in a clinical context. In line with Hammond's view (Med Decis Mak 16(3):281-287, 1996a; Human judgment and social policy: irreducible uncertainty, inevitable error, unavoidable injustice, Oxford University Press, New York, 1996b), we will extend the two metatheories to two forms of competence: coherence competence and correspondence competence, and demonstrate that distinguishing these two forms of competence increases our insights as to the best way to teach undergraduate students clinical problem solving. SN - 1573-1677 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30671703/Theories_of_truth_and_teaching_clinical_reasoning_and_problem_solving L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10459-018-09871-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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