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Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) for Intumescence Severity in Eucalyptus globulus and Validation of QTL Detection Based on Phenotyping Using Open-Pollinated Families of a Mapping Population.
Plant Dis. 2018 Aug; 102(8):1566-1573.PD

Abstract

Intumescence is a nonpathogenic physiological disorder characterized by leaf blistering. This disorder can affect growth and development in glasshouses and growth chambers and may be confused with pathogenic diseases. We used quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis to examine the genetic basis of variation in intumescence severity in Eucalyptus globulus, and test for colocation with previously detected QTLs for pathogen susceptibility. QTL analysis used the phenotype means of open-pollinated (OP) families of an outcrossed F2 mapping family (OP F3; n = 300) of E. globulus and the linkage map constructed in the F2. We validate this phenotyping approach for QTL analysis by assessing a trait previously used for QTL discovery in the F2 and showing the same major QTL was detected with the OP F3. For intumescence severity, five putative QTLs were detected across four linkage groups. Four of these did not colocate with previously reported QTLs for fungal pathogen susceptibility in Eucalyptus, suggesting the mechanisms underlying susceptibility to intumescence and to the two fungal pathogens are largely independent. This study demonstrates there is a genetic basis for variation in intumescence severity, reports the first QTL for intumescence severity in plants, and provides a robust framework for investigating the potential mechanisms involved.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Scion, Rotorua, 3046, New Zealand; and School of Natural Science and ARC Training Centre for Forest Value, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia.Scion, Rotorua, 3046, New Zealand; and School of Natural Science and ARC Training Centre for Forest Value, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia.Scion, Rotorua, 3046, New Zealand; and School of Natural Science and ARC Training Centre for Forest Value, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia.Scion, Rotorua, 3046, New Zealand; and School of Natural Science and ARC Training Centre for Forest Value, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia.Scion, Rotorua, 3046, New Zealand; and School of Natural Science and ARC Training Centre for Forest Value, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia.Scion, Rotorua, 3046, New Zealand; and School of Natural Science and ARC Training Centre for Forest Value, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30673414

Citation

Ammitzboll, Hans, et al. "Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) for Intumescence Severity in Eucalyptus Globulus and Validation of QTL Detection Based On Phenotyping Using Open-Pollinated Families of a Mapping Population." Plant Disease, vol. 102, no. 8, 2018, pp. 1566-1573.
Ammitzboll H, Vaillancourt RE, Potts BM, et al. Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) for Intumescence Severity in Eucalyptus globulus and Validation of QTL Detection Based on Phenotyping Using Open-Pollinated Families of a Mapping Population. Plant Dis. 2018;102(8):1566-1573.
Ammitzboll, H., Vaillancourt, R. E., Potts, B. M., Singarasa, S., Mani, R., & Freeman, J. S. (2018). Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) for Intumescence Severity in Eucalyptus globulus and Validation of QTL Detection Based on Phenotyping Using Open-Pollinated Families of a Mapping Population. Plant Disease, 102(8), 1566-1573. https://doi.org/10.1094/PDIS-01-18-0003-RE
Ammitzboll H, et al. Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) for Intumescence Severity in Eucalyptus Globulus and Validation of QTL Detection Based On Phenotyping Using Open-Pollinated Families of a Mapping Population. Plant Dis. 2018;102(8):1566-1573. PubMed PMID: 30673414.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) for Intumescence Severity in Eucalyptus globulus and Validation of QTL Detection Based on Phenotyping Using Open-Pollinated Families of a Mapping Population. AU - Ammitzboll,Hans, AU - Vaillancourt,René E, AU - Potts,Brad M, AU - Singarasa,Sambavi, AU - Mani,Radhika, AU - Freeman,Jules S, Y1 - 2018/06/12/ PY - 2019/1/24/entrez PY - 2019/1/24/pubmed PY - 2019/3/1/medline SP - 1566 EP - 1573 JF - Plant disease JO - Plant Dis. VL - 102 IS - 8 N2 - Intumescence is a nonpathogenic physiological disorder characterized by leaf blistering. This disorder can affect growth and development in glasshouses and growth chambers and may be confused with pathogenic diseases. We used quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis to examine the genetic basis of variation in intumescence severity in Eucalyptus globulus, and test for colocation with previously detected QTLs for pathogen susceptibility. QTL analysis used the phenotype means of open-pollinated (OP) families of an outcrossed F2 mapping family (OP F3; n = 300) of E. globulus and the linkage map constructed in the F2. We validate this phenotyping approach for QTL analysis by assessing a trait previously used for QTL discovery in the F2 and showing the same major QTL was detected with the OP F3. For intumescence severity, five putative QTLs were detected across four linkage groups. Four of these did not colocate with previously reported QTLs for fungal pathogen susceptibility in Eucalyptus, suggesting the mechanisms underlying susceptibility to intumescence and to the two fungal pathogens are largely independent. This study demonstrates there is a genetic basis for variation in intumescence severity, reports the first QTL for intumescence severity in plants, and provides a robust framework for investigating the potential mechanisms involved. SN - 0191-2917 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30673414/Quantitative_Trait_Loci_(QTLs)_for_Intumescence_Severity_in_Eucalyptus_globulus_and_Validation_of_QTL_Detection_Based_on_Phenotyping_Using_Open-Pollinated_Families_of_a_Mapping_Population L2 - http://apsjournals.apsnet.org/doi/full/10.1094/PDIS-01-18-0003-RE?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -