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Lithium: contributor to movement disorder sensitivity after anoxic brain injury?
SAGE Open Med Case Rep. 2019; 7:2050313X18823101.SO

Abstract

Although lithium-induced dystonia has been well documented in the literature, conflicting evidence discusses whether a patient may be susceptible to adverse effects from the drug after an anoxic brain injury. More recent literature discusses that lithium may, in fact, be neuroprotective. This case report presents a 35-year-old male who, after an anoxic brain injury after a suicide attempt, developed lithium-induced dystonia with characteristic symptoms of sustained muscle contractions, repetitive movements, and postures, which was not markedly improved with benztropine or benzodiazepines. It is postulated that because this patient received a depot neuroleptic with a subsequent anoxic brain injury, he may have become more sensitive to lithium and its rare complications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada.Department of Psychiatry, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada.Providence Care Mental Health Services, Kingston, ON, Canada.Department of Psychiatry, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30675359

Citation

Pikard, Jennifer L., et al. "Lithium: Contributor to Movement Disorder Sensitivity After Anoxic Brain Injury?" SAGE Open Medical Case Reports, vol. 7, 2019, p. 2050313X18823101.
Pikard JL, Oliver D, Saraceno J, et al. Lithium: contributor to movement disorder sensitivity after anoxic brain injury? SAGE Open Med Case Rep. 2019;7:2050313X18823101.
Pikard, J. L., Oliver, D., Saraceno, J., & Groll, D. (2019). Lithium: contributor to movement disorder sensitivity after anoxic brain injury? SAGE Open Medical Case Reports, 7, 2050313X18823101. https://doi.org/10.1177/2050313X18823101
Pikard JL, et al. Lithium: Contributor to Movement Disorder Sensitivity After Anoxic Brain Injury. SAGE Open Med Case Rep. 2019;7:2050313X18823101. PubMed PMID: 30675359.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lithium: contributor to movement disorder sensitivity after anoxic brain injury? AU - Pikard,Jennifer L, AU - Oliver,Dijana, AU - Saraceno,Justin, AU - Groll,Dianne, Y1 - 2019/01/10/ PY - 2016/12/19/received PY - 2018/12/13/accepted PY - 2019/1/25/entrez PY - 2019/1/25/pubmed PY - 2019/1/25/medline KW - Lithium KW - anoxia KW - brain injury KW - dystonia SP - 2050313X18823101 EP - 2050313X18823101 JF - SAGE open medical case reports JO - SAGE Open Med Case Rep VL - 7 N2 - Although lithium-induced dystonia has been well documented in the literature, conflicting evidence discusses whether a patient may be susceptible to adverse effects from the drug after an anoxic brain injury. More recent literature discusses that lithium may, in fact, be neuroprotective. This case report presents a 35-year-old male who, after an anoxic brain injury after a suicide attempt, developed lithium-induced dystonia with characteristic symptoms of sustained muscle contractions, repetitive movements, and postures, which was not markedly improved with benztropine or benzodiazepines. It is postulated that because this patient received a depot neuroleptic with a subsequent anoxic brain injury, he may have become more sensitive to lithium and its rare complications. SN - 2050-313X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30675359/Lithium:_contributor_to_movement_disorder_sensitivity_after_anoxic_brain_injury L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/30675359/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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