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Regenerative Failure Following Rat Neonatal Chorda Tympani Transection is Associated with Geniculate Ganglion Cell Loss and Terminal Field Plasticity in the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract.
Neuroscience 2019; 402:66-77N

Abstract

Neural insult during development results in recovery outcomes that vary dependent upon the system under investigation. Nerve regeneration does not occur if the rat gustatory chorda tympani nerve is sectioned (CTX) during neonatal (≤P10) development. It is unclear how chorda tympani soma and terminal fields are affected after neonatal CTX. The current study determined the impact of neonatal CTX on chorda tympani neurons and brainstem gustatory terminal fields. To assess terminal field volume in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), rats received CTX at P5 or P10 followed by chorda tympani label, or glossopharyngeal (GL) and greater superficial petrosal (GSP) label as adults. In another group of animals, terminal field volumes and numbers of chorda tympani neurons in the geniculate ganglion (GG) were determined by labeling the chorda tympani with DiI at the time of CTX in neonatal (P5) and adult (P50) rats. There was a greater loss of chorda tympani neurons following P5 CTX compared to adult denervation. Chorda tympani terminal field volume was dramatically reduced 50 days after P5 or P10 CTX. Lack of nerve regeneration after neonatal CTX is not caused by ganglion cell death alone, as approximately 30% of chorda tympani neurons survived into adulthood. Although the total field volume of intact gustatory nerves was not altered, the GSP volume and GSP-GL overlap increased in the dorsal NTS after CTX at P5, but not P10, demonstrating age-dependent plasticity. Our findings indicate that the developing gustatory system is highly plastic and simultaneously vulnerable to injury.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE, USA.Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE, USA.Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE, USA.Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE, USA. Electronic address: ssollars@unomaha.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30684590

Citation

Martin, Louis J., et al. "Regenerative Failure Following Rat Neonatal Chorda Tympani Transection Is Associated With Geniculate Ganglion Cell Loss and Terminal Field Plasticity in the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract." Neuroscience, vol. 402, 2019, pp. 66-77.
Martin LJ, Lane AH, Samson KK, et al. Regenerative Failure Following Rat Neonatal Chorda Tympani Transection is Associated with Geniculate Ganglion Cell Loss and Terminal Field Plasticity in the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract. Neuroscience. 2019;402:66-77.
Martin, L. J., Lane, A. H., Samson, K. K., & Sollars, S. I. (2019). Regenerative Failure Following Rat Neonatal Chorda Tympani Transection is Associated with Geniculate Ganglion Cell Loss and Terminal Field Plasticity in the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract. Neuroscience, 402, pp. 66-77. doi:10.1016/j.neuroscience.2019.01.011.
Martin LJ, et al. Regenerative Failure Following Rat Neonatal Chorda Tympani Transection Is Associated With Geniculate Ganglion Cell Loss and Terminal Field Plasticity in the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract. Neuroscience. 2019 03 15;402:66-77. PubMed PMID: 30684590.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Regenerative Failure Following Rat Neonatal Chorda Tympani Transection is Associated with Geniculate Ganglion Cell Loss and Terminal Field Plasticity in the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract. AU - Martin,Louis J, AU - Lane,Amy H, AU - Samson,Kaeli K, AU - Sollars,Suzanne I, Y1 - 2019/01/24/ PY - 2018/10/17/received PY - 2019/01/08/revised PY - 2019/01/11/accepted PY - 2020/03/15/pmc-release PY - 2019/1/27/pubmed PY - 2019/6/22/medline PY - 2019/1/27/entrez KW - glossopharyngeal nerve KW - greater superficial petrosal nerve KW - gustatory KW - nerve section KW - regeneration KW - taste SP - 66 EP - 77 JF - Neuroscience JO - Neuroscience VL - 402 N2 - Neural insult during development results in recovery outcomes that vary dependent upon the system under investigation. Nerve regeneration does not occur if the rat gustatory chorda tympani nerve is sectioned (CTX) during neonatal (≤P10) development. It is unclear how chorda tympani soma and terminal fields are affected after neonatal CTX. The current study determined the impact of neonatal CTX on chorda tympani neurons and brainstem gustatory terminal fields. To assess terminal field volume in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), rats received CTX at P5 or P10 followed by chorda tympani label, or glossopharyngeal (GL) and greater superficial petrosal (GSP) label as adults. In another group of animals, terminal field volumes and numbers of chorda tympani neurons in the geniculate ganglion (GG) were determined by labeling the chorda tympani with DiI at the time of CTX in neonatal (P5) and adult (P50) rats. There was a greater loss of chorda tympani neurons following P5 CTX compared to adult denervation. Chorda tympani terminal field volume was dramatically reduced 50 days after P5 or P10 CTX. Lack of nerve regeneration after neonatal CTX is not caused by ganglion cell death alone, as approximately 30% of chorda tympani neurons survived into adulthood. Although the total field volume of intact gustatory nerves was not altered, the GSP volume and GSP-GL overlap increased in the dorsal NTS after CTX at P5, but not P10, demonstrating age-dependent plasticity. Our findings indicate that the developing gustatory system is highly plastic and simultaneously vulnerable to injury. SN - 1873-7544 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30684590/Regenerative_Failure_Following_Rat_Neonatal_Chorda_Tympani_Transection_is_Associated_with_Geniculate_Ganglion_Cell_Loss_and_Terminal_Field_Plasticity_in_the_Nucleus_of_the_Solitary_Tract L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306-4522(19)30031-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -